2004 Annual Meeting

Lectures | Imaging Workshops | Cardiac Conduction Mini-Meeting
Student Award Sessions | Education and Teaching Track | Symposia
Platform Sessions | Poster Topics

LECTURES

Keynote Speaker
Ting-Kai Li – NIAAA Director
Sunday, April 18, 6:00 - 7:00 pm
Old Problems, New Approaches in Alcohol Research

Supported by  JEOL USA, Inc. through the AACBNC
Organized by James R. West
President-Elect of the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology Chairpersons (AACBNC)

 

R.R. Bensley Award Lecture in Cell Biology
Carol C. Gregorio (University of Arizona)
Tuesday, April 20, 5:00 - 6:00 pm
How Do Cardiac Myocytes Regulate the Lengths of the Actin-containing Thin Filaments?
Abstract:Actin (thin) filament length regulation and stability are essential for striated muscle function.  To determine the role of the actin filament pointed end capping protein, tropomodulin1 (Tmod1) with tropomyosin, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAb17 and mAb8) against Tmod1 that specifically disrupted its interaction with tropomyosin in vitro.  Microinjection of mAb17 or mAb8 into chick cardiac myocytes caused a dramatic loss of the thin filaments, as revealed by immunofluorescence deconvolution microscopy.  Real-time imaging of live myocytes expressing GFP-a-tropomyosin and microinjected with mAb17 revealed that the thin filaments depolymerized from their pointed ends.  In a thin filament cell permeabilization reconstitution assay, stabilization of the filaments with phalloidin or jasplakinolide, prior to the addition of mAb17 prevented the loss of thin filaments. As a complementary approach, we also microinjected a recombinant N-terminal fragment of Tmod1 containing the tropomyosin binding site.  Again, a loss of actin filaments was observed, likely due to a dominant-negative mechanism.  These studies indicate that the interaction of Tmod1 with tropomyosin is critical for thin filament stability.  These data, together with previous studies, indicate that Tmod1 is a multifunctional protein.  Its actin filament capping activity is responsible for maintaining actin length, by preventing elongation from the pointed ends; the tropomyosin binding activity stabilizes actin-thin filaments by preventing depolymerization of the thin filaments.

 

C.J. Herrick Award Lecture in Neuroanatomy
Linda J. Richards (University of Maryland School of Medicine)
Sunday, April 18, 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Mechanisms of Axon Guidance in the Development of the Corpus Callosum
Abstract: The corpus callosum is the largest commissure in the brain and connects neurons in the left and right cerebral hemispheres. As callosal axons grow toward the cortical midline during development they initially grow in a steep ventral trajectory until they reach the septum. At this corticoseptal boundary the axons make a sharp turn medially to cross the midline and enter the contralateral hemisphere. After crossing the midline the axons then turn away from the septum and project dorsally into first the cingulate cortex and then the neocortex. Midline glial populations play an important role in regulating callosal axon guidance at these decision points. One population, the glial wedge, resides at the corticoseptal boundary on either side of midline and expresses Slit2, a molecule that repels the axons both before and after they cross the midline. An additional guidance mechanism used by axons is to fasciculate with pioneering axons to find their targets. The pioneering axons of the corpus callosum reside in the cingulate cortex and express the guidance receptor Neuropilin 1 (Npn1). In vivo evidence indicates that Npn1 is required for callosal development. The regulation of callosal development by a number of guidance molecules, receptors and transcription factors will be discussed.

H.W. Mossman Award Lecture in Developmental Biology
Olivier Pourquié (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Monday, April 19, 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Vertebrate Somitogenesis: A Paradigm for Animal Segmentation?
Abstract: The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and sekeletal muscles of the body. We have shown that a molecular oscillator, called the segmentation clock underlies the segmentation process in vertebrates. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves FGF signaling. The FGF pathway controls the positioning of the wavefront, which corresponds to the level of the presomitic mesoderm where cells respond to the clock. fgf8 mRNA is only transcribed in tail bud precursors and it progressively decays in newly formed paraxial mesoderm cells, thus forming a dynamic mRNA gradient. This mRNA gradient is then translated into a graded FGF signaling response used to position the wavefront. This mechanism provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Recent studies in invertebrates have opened the exciting possibility that the clock and wavefront patterning system characterized in vertebrates might in fact operate also in invertebrates and thus represent an ancestral segmentation mechanism shared by these two phyla.

CARDIAC CONDUCTION MINI-MEETING

CHOREOGRAPHY OF THE HEART BEAT: THE CARDIAC PACEMAKING AND CONDUCTION SYSTEM
Supported by educational grants from March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
Chairs: Michiko Watanabe (Case Western Reserve University) and Robert Gourdie (Medical University of South Carolina)
The cardiac pacemaking and conduction system (PCS) is vital for generating and synchronizing the heart beat. Dysfunction of this critical system can result in conduction disturbance, arrhythmias, and sudden death. Recent advances in technology, PCS development, cellular organization, and electrophysiology suggest new paradigms and open up exciting avenues for research in PCS biology. This meeting offers a cross-disciplinary forum for basic scientists, clinicians, and biomedical engineers working in disparate aspects of the PCS to share their knowledge and insights.
Topics include the developmental biology, molecular and cell biology, morphology, electrophysiology, and pathology of the developing and mature cardiac pacemaking and conduction system.
 

THE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE MATURE PACEMAKING AND CARDIAC CONDUCTION SYSTEM
Sunday, April 18, 10:30 am - 1:00 pm
Chair: Igor Efimov (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Igor Efimov (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
AV Nodal Structure and Function
Mark Boyett (Univ. of Leeds)
SA Nodal Function
Omer Berenfeld (SUNY Upstate Medical Univ.)
Inward Rectifier Channels and Atrial Fibrillation
Tatsuo Shimada (Oita Medical Univ., Oita)
Structural Differences in the Cytoarchitecture and Intercalated Discs Between the Working Myocardium and Conduction System
David Rosenbaum (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
The Nature and Significance of Electrophysiological Heterogenities in the Heart


THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PACEMAKING AND CARDIAC CONDUCTION SYSTEM I
Sunday, April 18, 2:00 - 4:30 pm
Co-chairs: Michiko Watanabe and Florence Rothenberg (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Takashi Mikawa (Weill Medical College of Cornell Univ.)
Induction and Patterning of the Purkinje Fiber Network
Robert Gourdie and Brett Harris (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Regulation of Gap Junctional Coupling in Cardiac Conduction/Nkx-2.5 and Conduction System Development
Glenn Fishman (New York Univ. School of Medicine)
Mapping the Cardiac Conduction System in Mouse—Factors for Induction
Daniel Gros (Univ. de la Mediterranee)
Imaging of the Cardiac Conduction System in the Mouse
Kiyomasa Nishii (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka)
Deletion of the Gap Junction Protein Connexin45 Causes Abnormal Heart Conduction Rhythm in the Embryo

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PACEMAKING AND CARDIAC CONDUCTION SYSTEM II
Monday, April 19, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Robert Gourdie (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
David Sedmera (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Developmental Transitions in Electrical Activation Patterns in Chick Embryonic Heart
John B.E. Burch (Fox Chase Cancer Center)
Transcriptional Regulation in the Developing Cardiac Conduction System
Michiko Watanabe and Florence Rothenberg (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Transitions in the His-Purkinje System Function
Ivan Moskowitz (Harvard Medical School)
The Role of the T-box Transcription Factor TBX5 in Conduction System Development

THE PATHOLOGY AND REPAIR OF THE PACEMAKING AND CARDIAC CONDUCTION SYSTEM
Monday, April 19, 10:30 am - 1:00 pm
Chair: David Lathrop (NHLBI, NIH)
Patrick Jay (Children's Hospital, Boston)
Nkx2-5 Mutation Causes Anatomic Hypoplasia of the Conduction System
Woodrow Benson (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)
Genetics of AV Conduction Disease in Humans
Jill Buyon (New York Univ. School of Medicine)
Autoimmune Associated CHB: Maternal Anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La Antibodies and Apotosis of Fetal Cardiocytes
Robert Clancy (New York Univ. School of Medicine)
Autoantibody Associated CHB: TGFß in the Pathway from Antibody Insult to Scarring
Richard Robinson (Columbia Univ.)
Genes, Stem Cells, and Biological Pacemakers
Vinciane Gaussin (UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School)
ALK3 is Necessary for Atrio-ventricular Conduction System Development

STUDENT AWARD PLATFORM SESSIONS

LANGMAN GRAD STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATIONS

Saturday, April 17, 3:30 - 5:00 pm
Lily Francis (University of Utah)
Role of FGF-4 and FGF-8 in Pharyngeal Arch Vascular Development
John Roberts (Baylor College of Dentistry)
TGF-ß3 Induced EMT of the Chicken Palatal Shelves is PI-3 Kinase Dependent
Jennifer Unger (Northeastern Ohio University College of Med)
Transcriptional Control of Isotocin Cell Development: Patterning the Zebrafish Hypothalamus
Fabien D'autreaux (Columbia University)
Dependence of the Development of Enteric Neurons Upon the Expression of the Basic Helix-loop-helix (bHLH) Transcription Factor, Hand2
Styliani Markoulaki (Tufts University School of Medicine)
CaMKII Activity Oscillates in Fertilized Eggs and Early Oscillations are Responsible for Cell Cycle Resumption and Secretion
Hortense E. Nsoh Tabien (University of Saskatchewan)
Novel Role of Quercetin in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

PRESLEY-ZEISS POSTDOC AWARD PRESENTATIONS

Saturday, April 18, 5:30 - 7:00 pm
Tamara Franz-Odendaal (Dalhousie University)
Understanding the Induction of Scleral Ossicles in Avian Embryos
Chi Zhang (Florida Atlantic University)
Cloning of an Myofibril Inducing RNA (MIR) That Promotes Myofibrillogenesis
Maria Herrero (University of Virginia)
A Unique C Lysozyme-like Protein Has a Role in Fertilization
Bing Xu (Case Western Reserve University)
Cardiac Malformations, Adrenal Agenesis, Exencephaly, Splenic and Hepato-hypoplasia in Cited2-deficient Embryos on a C57BL/6J Genetic Background
Shyam Manisastry (USF- Children's Research Institute)
Effects of Lithium and BMP Inhibition on Cardiac Boundary Formation
Guiyun Zhang (Thomas Jefferson University)
Development of Tendon Structure and Function In The Decorin-Deficient Mouse: Relationship Between Decorin And Biglycan Expression

IMAGING WORKSHOPS

USING IMAGING FOR DATA MINING

Saturday, April 17, 12:30 - 3:00 pm
Chair: Charlie Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
The advent of sensitive high-speed detectors and creative software has brought about a revitalization of light microscopy in biology particularly for motion analysis. In this symposium, the speakers describe creative approaches for investigating the mechanisms underlying early vertebrate morphogenesis in fish, frog, and avian embryos. They will provide concrete examples of how different kinds of microscopic instrumentation, software, and optically-sensitive probes can be employed to investigate dynamic relationships between separate but interacting groups of cells or tissues during neural crest migration, axis formation, gastrulation, and angiogenesis. The capability of the optical microscope to integrate biological motion in cells and tissues with gene and protein expression data allows coherent studies of complex systems, a trend that will profoundly impact the future of experimental biology. Dynamic digital image analysis also lends itself to the sophisticated computational approaches of physics, engineering and applied mathematics.
Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Measuring ECM Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo Using a Time-lapse Imaging Approach
Brant Weinstein (Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, NICHD, NIH)
Imaging Developing Blood Vessels in the Zebrafish
Lance Davidson (Univ. of Virginia)
Dynamics of Fibrallar Fibronectin During Morphogenesis
Martin Garcia-Castro (California Institute of Technology)
Induction of Neural Crest

WHOLE BODY IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION

Saturday, April 17, 3:30 - 6:00 pm
Chair: Jonathan Nissanov (Drexel Univ.)
Imaging gene expression is of significant value in a wide range of settings. Mapping the spatio-temporal pattern of expression is an important step in establishing the functional role of a gene. It can also be exploited as a reporter of many other events such as success of gene therapy delivery or the migration of injected stem cells. Most of these applications benefit from imaging methods that are rapid and support wide fields of view. Featured topics cover four imaging modalities that promise these capabilities: PET, MRI, bioluminescent imaging, and cryoplane microscopy.
Mikhail Doubrovin (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
Multi-modality, In Vivo Imaging of Signal Transduction Pathway Activity
Christopher H. Contag (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine)
In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging for Cellular and Molecular Analyses
Russell E. Jacobs (Beckman Institute at Caltech)
MRI Based 3D Digital Developmental Atlases of the Mouse and Quail
Jonathan Nissanov (Drexel Univ.)
Wide Field Gene Expression Surveys Using 3D Cryoplane Microscopy

EDUCATION AND TEACHING TRACK

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES

Monday, April 19, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Supported by an educational grant from Elsevier Science USA
The Role of Anatomical Science Teaching in Faculty Appointment and Promotion Decisions
Co-sponsored by the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA)
Wade Grow (Midwestern Univ.)
Geoffrey Guttmann (Northern Ontario Medical School-West Lakehead Univ.)
Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT: FUNDING RESOURCES FOR EDUCATION PROJECTS

Tuesday, April 20, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Luncheon is supported by an educational grant from Icon Learning Systems
Co-sponsored by AACA
Chair: Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine) and Wojciech Pawlina (Mayo Clinic/Mayo Medical School)
Medical school faculty interest in obtaining extramural funding to develop teaching programs and materials is on the rise. The increased interest principally reflects decreasing allocations of institutional dollars to teaching and educational programs and increasing costs of educational technology. This workshop will help interested teaching faculty deal effectively and creatively with this situation. The leadoff speaker will discuss experiences in obtaining funding to develop a multi-institutional anatomy education project. This talk will be followed by brief presentations from representatives of federal educational funding agencies about their programs. After hearing from the agency representatives, we will break out into small discussion groups with the speakers and audience members—an Education Funding Fair enabling faculty to find out more about available resources from funding agencies, and allowing the agencies to learn about projects underway from faculty.
Noelle Granger Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Finding Support for Educational Projects in Anatomy: Tips, Tools, and Lessons Learned

Panel Presentation & Discussion on Funding Resources for Education Projects
Milton Corn(NIH, National Library of Medicine)
Karen Levitan (Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Dept. of Education)
Judith Miller (National Board of Medical Examiners)
Bianca Bernstein (NSF, Division of Graduate Education)

HISTOPATHOLOGY OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

Monday, April 19, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Suzzette Chopin (Texas A & M Univ. - Corpus Christi)
This session looks at clinical and histological presentations of Alzheimer’s Disease, stroke, spongiform encephalopathies, and Parkinson’s Disease. Plaques, tangles, neuron, and myelin loss and Lewy/cerebrovascular pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease will be correlated with clinical findings. The use of functional brain imaging to follow ischemic lesion evolution in stroke will be explained. Pathogenesis and molecular classification of prion diseases will be discussed, as will public health concerns involving the spongiform encephalopathies. Pathological features of Parkinson’s Disease will be delineated, including the cellular pathology involving genes and proteins.
Alison Baird (NINDS/NIH)
Neuroimaging of Stroke
Diane Murphy (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)
Histopathology of Parkinson's Disease
Daniel McKeel (Washington Univ., St. Louis)
The Neuropathologic Distinction Between Nondemented Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease in a Longitudinal Study
Man-sun Sy (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Histopathology of Spongiform Encephalopathies

INTEGRATIVE MASTER CLASS IN ANATOMY: THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

Saturday, April 17, 12:30 - 3:00 pm
Chair: Linda Walters (Midwestern Univ., Glendale Campus)
Restructuring of anatomy departments, the shortage of “classically-trained” anatomists, a reduction in the number of hours dedicated to anatomical instruction, and an ever-increasing demand for integration of clinical information are part of the changing environment in which anatomy faculty find themselves. This symposium is the first in a new series designed to provide opportunities for experienced anatomists, non-classically trained anatomists, and clinicians to refresh and improve their integrative knowledge of specific anatomical regions or systems. This first symposium will highlight the Gastrointestinal Tract. Featured topics include selected reviews of: the anatomy and histology of the GI system emphasizing surface landmarks and imaging, the milestones in GI development focusing on the clinical implications of common GI malformations, and the enteric nervous system and its role in GI function and disease. The symposium will conclude with a presentation of case-based GI problems that integrate the anatomical sciences in their solutions.
Thomas Gest (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
Anatomy and Histology of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Maureen Condic (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Embryology of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Michael Gershon (Columbia Univ.)
The Second Brain
Anne Gilroy (Univ. of Massachusetts Memorial Healthcare)
Clinical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract

REFRESHER COURSE: REDEFINING LIGAMENTS, JOINTS AND SUTURES IN THE MOLECULAR AGE

Sunday, April 18, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Qian Chen (Rhode Island Hospital)
Biological structure that bridges neighboring skeletal elements, including ligament, joints, and sutures, defines skeletal pattern formation during development and serves as a mechanical linkage in adults. Great progress has been made in understanding the molecular nature of these biological structures in recent years. Speakers will discuss recent progress, including important genes regulating onset of joint formation, signaling pathways determining osteochondral progenitor cell lineage in the skull, mechanobiological comparisons between cranial sutures, joint, and growth plates, and three-dimensional visualization of in vivo kinematics of joints.
Qian Chen (Rhode Island Hospital)
Molecular Regulation of Osteochondro Progenitor Cell Lineage in the Skull
Jeremy Mao (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)
Cranial Sutures as a Joint and Growth Plate? Mechanobiological Evidence
David Burr (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
The Role of the Subchondral Mineralized Tissues in the Initiation and Progression of Osteoarthrosis
Joseph Crisco (Rhode Island Hospital)
The Bony Carpus: Complex In Vivo Kinematics Visualized

TEACHING HUMAN EMBRYOLOGY: APPROACHES TO PRESENTING CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Tuesday, April 20, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Co-sponsored by AACA
Co-chairs: Dave Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) and Thomas Sadler (Birth Defects and Embryology Consultant)
Like many basic science courses, Human Embryology has been scrutinized closely as to its relevance to medical student education, how many hours should be taught, and what aspects of the discipline should be emphasized. The question of relevance has been answered by two recent developments: (1) Birth defects are the leading cause of infant mortality, yet prevention strategies have been developed that can reduce the incidence of defects and improve maternal and infant health. The fact that women of childbearing age are seen in the practice of nearly every physician makes the requirement for having knowledge of basic embryology universal in the medical community; and (2) Molecular genetics has demonstrated that many of the genes important for embryonic development contribute to childhood and adult disorders. Therefore, understanding the genetic basis for developmental events can elucidate mechanisms of gene interactions, provide information about risks for disease postnatally, serve as a basis for counseling parents, and lead to prevention strategies. Assuming that Human Embryology should be taught, how can a successful approach be designed that would address its clinical relevance and its contribution to molecular genetics? Our speakers will address a number of critical questions: (1) How many hours are required to teach a basic course? (2) Where should Embryology be taught: Gross Anatomy, Molecular Genetics? (3) What topics are important and where do faculty obtain teaching materials? (4) What is important from a future physician’s perspective?
Tom Sadler (Birth Defects and Embryology Consultant)
Teaching Clinically-oriented Embryology: Why and How?
Tom Kwasigroch (Quillen Medical College)
New Approaches to Teaching Clinically-oriented Embryology
Tom Knudsen (Thomas Jefferson Univ.)
Web-based Tools for Teaching Embryology and Teratology
Bill Allen (Fullerton Genetics Center)
The Clinical Relevance of Embryology: A Physician's Perspective

THE VISIBLE HUMAN GOES TO MEDICAL SCHOOL

Sunday, April 18, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Co-sponsored by AACA
Chair: Donald Jenkins (NIH, National Library of Medicine)
In the past several years, several teaching applications using the Visible Human Project data have matured. These applications have focused on Internet 2 high bandwidth communications, quantitative anatomy concepts, and the ability to segment structures in the human body to create and emulate computer dissection. At the Univ. of Michigan, the Univ. of Colorado, Stanford Univ., and Harvard Univ., landmark experiments to test the hypothesis that advanced digital imaging advanced technology can synergistically blend and enhance the learning process is proceeding. This symposium will illustrate these efforts and discuss future development into the creation of virtual simulation representations of the human body.
Parvati Dev (Stanford Univ.)
High Bandwith Internet 2 Applications for Access to Rich Interactive Media
Brian Athey (Univ. of Michigan)
Lessons Learned: Ten Years of the Visible Human at the University of Michigan
Peter Ratiu (Harvard Univ. and Brigham & Women's Hospital)
Toward a Quantitative Anatomy
Victor Spitzer (Univ. of Colorado)
The Visible Human Dissector: Your Personal Gross Anatomy Laboratory

SYMPOSIA

A RE-EXAMINATION OF CELLULAR SECRETION - Henry Gray Award Symposium

Tuesday, April 20, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Chair: George Pappas (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)
Secretion is a process common to all cells. Recent studies of vesicular secretion have provided important new insights on the packaging, transport, and release mechanisms. Yeast genetics has revealed a stepwise process spanning synthesis through transport and release of secretory proteins. Capacitance measurements of secretion by chromaffin cells show increasingly fine detail of the membrane-membrane events. Fine structures and electrophysiology of the neuromuscular junction focus on coordinate release of neurotransmitter from many vesicles. Theoretical and physical chemical studies of calcium-lipid-lipid interactions have led to the Porocytosis hypothesis, in which secretion occurs through transient membrane pores resulting from characteristic interactions of calcium and lipids. This symposium offers a unique perspective on our current understanding of secretion.
Randy W. Schekman (Univ. of California, Berkley)
Dynamics of Secretion in Yeast
Cristina Artalejo (Wayne State Univ.)
Secretion in Chromaffin Cells
Mahlon B. Kriebel (SUNY Upstate Medical Center)
Porocytosis: Quantal Synaptic Secretion by an Array of Pores
Robert B. Silver (Wayne State Univ.)
Vesicular and Constitutive Secretion Without Membrane Fusion

CHICK AS A MODEL ORGANISM: THE GENOME AND BEYOND

Monday, April 19, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Parker Antin (Univ. of Arizona)
With sequencing of the chicken genome scheduled for completion in early 2004, exciting changes are on the horizon for avian embryo researchers. The availability of assembled genomic sequence, combined with recent advances in gene delivery and whole embryo imaging, promise to significantly enhance research capabilities in the chicken embryo. Speakers will discuss the status of the chicken genome project and ways to use genomic information and genomics related resources to enhance research. The latest methods for manipulating gene expression in the chicken embryo will also be presented, along with new approaches to whole embryo imaging.
Wesley Warren (Washington Univ. Medical School)
Sequencing the Chicken Genome
Parker Antin (Univ. of Arizona)
Chicken Genomic and Gene Expression Resources
Russell Lansford (California Institute of Technology)
Multimodal Imaging in Avian Embryos
Catherine Krull (Univ. of Missouri)
Manipulation of Gene Expression in Chick

CONTROVERSIES IN NON-CLASSICAL MECHANISMS OF CARDIAC REPAIR

Sunday, April 18, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
Much recent attention has focused on the therapeutic potential of exogenous bone marrow stem cells for heart repair. In fact, stem cells are currently in use in clinical trials. Yet data from animal models, while encouraging, is not consistent. Further, not much is known about the role of endogenous stem cells in heart repair, and what little is known remains controversial. Speakers will discuss their own work in the stem cell field with an emphasis on how it relates to heart maintenance and repair. They will also address controversies in the field, particularly with regard to endogenous stem cell functions in repair. A discussion will follow the presentations to determine if, and if so how, apparently dichotomous results in the stem cell literature can be reconciled. The appropriateness of clinical trials at this time will also be considered.
Nicanor Moldovan (Ohio State Univ.)
Mechanisms of Tissue Engraftment of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Noel Caplice (Mayo Clinic)
Cellular Targets in Cardiac Repair
Pierro Anversa (New York Medical College)
Myocardial Regeneration
Diane Krause (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Stem Cell Plasticity: Fact of Fusion?

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT: FUNDING RESOURCES FOR EDUCATION PROJECTS

See Education and Teaching Track

GENES UNDERLYING PATTERN
Sunday, April 18, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Supported by an educational grant from Aquatic Habitats
Chair: Marnie Halpern (Carnegie Institution of Washington)
How cells acquire their correct identity within the developing embryo is a question that has long fascinated developmental biologists. The speakers in this symposium will describe state-of-the-art genetic, cellular, and molecular approaches being used to elucidate the mechanistic basis of pattern formation in different vertebrate models. From the organization of the spinal cord and the determination of segmental hindbrain neurons to the acquisition of diverse cell types in the limb and the remarkable regularity of pigmentation patterns, each presentation will reveal new insights into the ways cells interpret their position and local environment to generate pattern in differentiating tissues.
Jonathan Eggenschwiler (Princeton Univ.)
Regulation of Hedgehog Signaling in Dorso-ventral Patterning of the Mouse Neural Tube
Victoria E. Prince (Univ. of Chicago)
Regulating Neural Identity and Zebrafish Behavior
Gabrielle Kardon (Harvard Medical School)
Muscle Patterning in the Vertebrate Limb
David M. Parichy (Univ. of Texas)
Cell Lineage and Morphogenesis During Zebrafish Pigment Stripe Development

HISTOPATHOLOGY OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

See Education and Teaching Track

HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS – BASIC BIOLOGY
Wednesday, April 21, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Mahendra Rao (NIH-National Institute of Aging)
Human ES cells have only recently been isolated and numerous studies have been initiated to characterize this unique population. In this symposium, we have invited leading investigators in the field to present their results characterizing the proliferation and differentiation of human ES cells and comparing and contrasting the properties of different human ES cell lines and differentiating them from rodent ES cell populations.
Melissa Carpenter (Robarts Research Institute)
Long Term Stability and Differentiation of Human ES Cells
Brian Condie (Medical College of Georgia)
Differentiation of ES Cell Lines
Raj Puri (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA)
Microarray Analysis of Human ES Cells
Mahendra Rao (NIH-National Institute of Aging)
Comparison of Mouse and Human ES Cell Lines

INTEGRATIVE MASTER CLASS IN ANATOMY: THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

See Education and Teaching Track

IS GENE EXPRESSION AFFECTED BY GRAVITY?

Wednesday, April 21, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Supported by an educational grant from CASSLS at the Marine Biological Laboratory
Chair: Stephen Moorman (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Throughout evolutionary history, gravity has remained essentially constant in both its direction and magnitude. Because of this, it has been postulated that, although gravitational force might not play a direct role in regulating gene expression, changes in gravitational force could influence gene expression. This becomes increasingly important as we contemplate a greater exploration of space and other planets. There have been numerous attempts to study the effects of changes in gravitational force on cells in culture. We don’t know how those studies will relate to or predict the effects of changes in gravitational force in vivo. In this symposium, recent data on effects of changes in gravitational force on gene expression in cells in culture, in animals, and in live transgenic animals will be presented and discussed.
Millie Hughes-Fulford (VAMC/UCSF)
Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Cells in Culture
Timothy G. Hammond (Tulane Univ.Medical Center)
Microgravity vs. Simulated Microgravity Effects on Cells in Culture
Stephen J. Moorman (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Effects of a Range of Gravitational Forces on Zebrafish Embryos
Peter McCaffery (Univ.of Massachusetts Medical School)
Effects of Hypergravity on Mouse Embryos

NEUROINFLAMMATION AND THE REGULATION OF PAIN STATES

Sunday, April 18, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Supported by an educational grant from Loyola University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology
Chair: Fletcher White (Loyola Univ., Chicago)
The interaction between components of the nervous system and multiple target cells of the cutaneous immune system has received increased attention. This interaction occurs through the release of peripheral soluble factors (particularly cytokines) by cells of the immune system. Cytokines released during the course of inflammation can directly influence a variety of aspects of nervous system functioning. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1b, TNFa) can activate a myriad of changes in both neuronal and glial gene transcription as well as activity-dependent neuronal plasticity. Likewise, chemokines (chemotactic cytokines that attract lymphocytes) can have direct effects on various aspects of neural development, as well as modulation of neuronal signaling through their G-protein-coupled receptors present on both neuron subpopulations and glial cells.
Claudia Sommer (Baverische Julius-Maximilians-Universitat)
Peripheral Actions of Cytokines in Neuropathic Pain
Joyce DeLeo (Dartmouth Medical School)
Immunologic Responses to Nerve Injury: Potential for Novel Therapy for Chronic Pain
Richard J. Miller (Northwestern Univ.)
The Role of Chemokines in the Development and Function of Nociceptive Neurons
Cecilia Canessa (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
On Proton Sensitivity of the ASICs: Functional Implications

NEURONAL-GLIAL INTERACTIONS IN THE NEUROENDOCRINE BRAIN: EVIDENCE OF SYNAPTIC MODULATION FROM DEVELOPMENT TO ADULTHOOD

Sunday, April 18, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Chair: Jessica Mong (Univ. of Maryland)
There is a growing appreciation for the importance of glial cells to overall brain function. For decades, glial cells were considered passive supporters of nerve cells. With the advent of new molecular and cellular imaging techniques, emerging evidence demonstrates that glial cells are active participants in the processes of synaptic patterning, synaptic transmission and information processing. Glial cells residing in steroid-concentrating brain regions have demonstrated responsiveness to steroid hormones, best characterized by changes in their morphology. Ultimately, changes in morphology must translate into changes in both glial and neuronal functioning if they are to be of relevance to neuroendocrine functions. This symposium will present anatomical and functional evidence for neuronal-glial interactions in various neuroendocrine systems throughout various stages of CNS development. Featured topics will include: steroid modulation of messengers involved in neuronal/glial crosstalk and the effects on the developing brain, glial control of GnRH secretion via bidirectional communication between neurons and glial cells in the hypothalamus, activity-dependent structural neuronal/ glial plasticity mediating oxytocin secretion, and effects of steroid mediated neuronal-glial interactions on behavioral outcomes.
Margaret McCarthy (Univ. of Maryland)
Steroid-mediated Cross Talk Between Astrocytes and Neurons Establishes Sex Differences in the Brain
Sergio Ojeda (Oregon Regional Primate Research Center)
Glial-neuronal Reciprocal Communication and the Neuroendocrine Control of Female Puberty
Dionysia Theodosis (INSERM U.378 Institut Francois Magendia)
Activity-dependent Structural Neuronal and Glial Plasticity in the Neuroendocrine Brain
Jessica Mong (Univ. of Maryland)
Evidence for the Participation of Neuronal-glial Interactions in Estradiol Mediated Behaviors

REFRESHER COURSE: REDEFINING LIGAMENTS, JOINTS AND SUTURES IN THE MOLECULAR AGE

See Education and Teaching Track

REMARKABLE ROLE OF THE MICROENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE PATHOGENESIS

Sunday, April 18, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chairpersons' Symposium
Chair: Mary J.C. Hendrix (Univ. of Iowa Cancer Center)
President of the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology Chairpersons (AACBNC)
A dynamic relationship exists between cells and their microenvironment, which plays a pivotal role in development and disease progression. However, the molecular regulation of the complex interactions that occur between cellular and extracellular components remains poorly understood. The speakers will discuss specific aspects of the microenvironment’s influence on developmental events and tumor cell pathogenesis. Featured topics include: the role of tissue architecture in the function and dysfunction of normal and malignant breast; the regulation of tissue homeostasis and disease pathogenesis by the extracellular matrix; the influence of the extracellular milieu on early vessel formation; and the epigenetic effects of the tumor microenvironment.
Mary J.C. Hendrix (Univ. of Iowa Cancer Center)
The Epigenetic Effects of the Tumor Microenvironment
Lisa Coussens (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
ECM Architecture Regulates Tissue Homeostasis and Disease Pathogenesis
Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Formation of the First Blood Vessels: The Influence of the Extracellular Milieu
Mina Bissell (Berkeley National Laboratory)
Tissue Architecture: The Ultimate Language of Function and Dysfunction in Normal and Malignant Breast

SIGNALING IN BONE DEVELOPMENT

Monday, April 19, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Lynne Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Great advances have been made in recent years in understanding the regulation of bone growth, structure, and function. These advances significantly enhance our ability to treat bone diseases, to replace bones lost due to disease or trauma, and to repair bones malformed during development. In this symposium, speakers will describe a variety of factors influencing bone development, differentiation, and growth. Topics will include environmental influences such as mechanosensory influences on bone cell gene expression, extracellular matrix regulation of skeletal structure and function, and growth and steroid factor regulation of skeletal development and differentiation.
Rik Derynck (Univ. of California at San Francisco)
The Role of BMP and RA Signaling in Regulating Osteoblast Differentiation
Marian Young (National Institutes of Health/NIDCR)
Small Leucine-rich Proteoglycans: Multifaceted Regulators of Skeletal Structure and Function
Lynda Bonewald (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City)
Mechanosensory Gene Expression in Osteocytes
David Ornitz (Washington Univ. Medical School)
Regulation of Skeletal Development by Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling

SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN EPITHELIAL-MESENCHYMAL TRANSFORMATION

Monday, April 19, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Chair: Elizabeth Hay (Harvard Medical School)
Recent advances in our understanding of the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) in development and cancer have created new interest in the causes of the phenomenon. The early vertebrate embryo forms mesoderm from the epiblast by EMT and some of these migrating mesenchymal cells transform back to epithelium (MET) when they reach their destination. Neural crest transforms from neural epithelium and fusion of embryonic anlage in the head (e.g., palate) takes place by EMT. One master signaling pathway for EMT has recently been shown to be ?-catenin/LEF-1. Sometimes called the “Wnt” pathway, this mechanism has recently been implicated in TGF? signaling in embryonic heart cushion EMT. EMT signaling by ILK or Fos also uses the LEF-1 pathway. Remarkable observations have been made recently by Attisano and Cho laboratories, revealing that in TGF? signaling to LEF-1, Smad/LEF-1 may be used instead of ?-catenin/LEF-1. In fact, only Smads are used in palatal EMT to activate LEF-1. MET is usually activated by the E-cadherin gene. Some transcription factors (e.g., Snail) turn on EMT by inhibiting the E-cadherin promoter. As cancer metastases are a form of EMT, there are practical reasons for learning more about MET as well as EMT signaling mechanisms.
Raymond Runyan (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine)
TGFb and Wnt Signaling in Embryonic Cardiac Cushion EMT
Calvin Roskelley (Univ. of British Columbia)
ILK Signals EMT Via LEF-1 Pathway
Liliana Attisano (Univ. of Toronto)
Wnt and TGFb Interact to Stimulate Gene Transcriptional Activity
Elizabeth Hay (Harvard Medical School)
TGFB Signals Embryonic Palatal EMT Via LEF-1 Using Smads

SWEET TALK: HEPARAN SULFATE PROTEOGLYCANS IN DEVELOPMENTAL CELL SIGNALING

Sunday, April 18, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Co-sponsored by the Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chair: Kenneth Kramer (Univ. of Utah)
Five signaling pathways control most cell-cell signaling in early development: Hedgehog, TGFB, Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, Wnt, and Notch. All five pathways have been shown to be regulated by glycosylation during development, the first four by heparan sulfate, and the last by fucosylation. Heparan sulfate is covalently attached to core proteins, which together functions as a co-receptor in several organisms. Analyses of Drosophilia, zebrafish, Xenopus, and mouse embryos that lack heparan sulfate, heparan sulfate modification, or a heparan sulfate core protein have recently demonstrated that heparan sulfate proteoglycans have additional roles as regulators of morphogen gradient formation and transducers of patterning information. The speakers will discuss these emerging roles, focusing on the contributions made by both heparan sulfate and heparin sulfate core proteins to regulate developmental cell-cell signaling.
Alan Rapraeger (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison)
Global Changes in Heparan Sulfate Expression as a Regulator of Morphogen Signaling
Arthur Lander (Univ. of California, Irvine)
Roles of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Morphogen Gradient Systems
Scott Selleck (Univ. of Minnesota)
Sculpting Morphogen Gradients and Signaling Responses with Proteoglycans
Kenneth Kramer (Univ. of Utah)
Proteoglycans as Inside-out Regulators of Cell-cell Signaling

TEACHING HUMAN EMBRYOLOGY: APPROACHES TO PRESENTING CLINICAL RELEVANCE

See Education and Teaching Track

THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME: SYSTEMS BIOLOGY AND MORPHOGENESIS

Tuesday, April 20, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Chair: Stuart Newman (New York Medical College) and Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
The recent celebrations of the 50th anniversary of Watson & Crick’s description of DNA structure and the virtual completion of the initial data-gathering phase of the Human Genome Project have prompted many to begin thinking “beyond the genome.” The rise of bioinformatics and computational biology that accompanied and fostered these important steps have also advanced the nascent field of “systems biology.” Because of its acknowledged complexity, morphogenesis is perennially among the biological processes that test the mettle of new approaches to scientific discovery. It is increasingly acknowledged as well that this set of phenomena cannot be satisfactorily understood without taking into account the changing relationships between genes and form across embryonic and evolutionary time scales. Thus, while answers to questions concerning the origin and generation of organismal form have clearly changed in the past 50 years, many of the most basic questions remain unanswered. The speakers in this symposium will address the use of bioinformatics and computational biology in identifying and exploring such issues. They will explain fundamental conceptual issues of morphogenesis and pattern formation, and describe how systems biologic approaches are now taking us to a new level of understanding.
Eric Davidson (California Institute of Technology)
The Sea Urchin Embryo Gene Regulatory Network: A Logic Map for Early Development
George von Dassow (Univ. of Washington)
Evolutionary Design of Developmental Patterning Mechanisms
Paulien Hogeweg (Utrecht Univ.)
Morphogenesis: The Interface Between Generic Processes, Gene Regulation and Evolution
Stuart Newman (New York Medical College)
Interplay Between Generic and Genetic Mechanisms in the Developing Vertebrate Limb

THE VISIBLE HUMAN GOES TO MEDICAL SCHOOL

See Education and Teaching Track

TISSUE BIOLOGY AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

Monday, April 19, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
Chair: Roger Markwald (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Recent advances and breakthrough in stem cell and tissue biology offer unique opportunity for development of new approaches for replacement, repair, and regeneration of injured tissues and organs. Regenerative medicine is one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical science, promising novel and exciting cost effective, minimally invasive and biology-inspired approaches for treatment of many human diseases and injuries. Successful development and clinical translation of this field must be based on our progress in understanding fundamental principles of biological self-assembly. It is essential to understand the new roles of circulated adult stem cells in histogenesis, organogenesis, and transplantation/engraftment, including integration, differentiation, and self-assembly. Regenerative medicine is an evolving discipline that can be defined as “applied developmental biology.” Thus, understanding normal developmental processes is a prerequisite for inventing new and more sophisticated methods of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In turn, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are providing new tools, approaches, and experimental models for studying tissue dynamics and fundamental mechanisms of developmental biology. The speakers will discuss approaches to enhance tissue and organ regeneration and to create functional bioengineered tissues and organ substitutes. Featured topics will include cell transplantation, stem cell recruitment, injectable tissue engineering, cell sheet technology, and organ printing and conceptual basis of regenerative medicine.
Augustinus Bader (Univ. Leipzig)
Regenerative Medicine
Jennifer Elisseeff (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Injectable Tissue Engineering
Teruo Okano (Tokyo Women's Medical Univ.)
Cell Sheet Technology
Gabor Forgacs (Univ. of Missouri)
Organ Printing
Doris A. Taylor (Univ. of Minnesota)
Cellular Cardiomyoplasty
Richard P. Visconti (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Recruitment of Circulated Stem Cells

USING IMAGING FOR DATA MINING

See Imaging Workshops

WHOLE BODY IMAGING OF GENE EXPRESSION

See Imaging Workshops

PLATFORMS SESSIONS

ADVANCES IN MAMMALIAN FERTILIZATION

Wednesday, April 21, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Barry Shur (Emory Univ. School of Medicine)
T. Hoodboy (NIDDK, NIH)
M. Ensslin (Emory Univ. School of Medicine)
K. Sutton (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
M.B. Herrero (Univ. of Virginia)
D.A. Ellerman (Univ. of California, Davis)
S. Markoulaki (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine)

CONTROL MECHANISMS IN MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS

Wednesday, April 21, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Paul Heidger (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine)
M. Dym (Georgetown Univ. Medical School)
M-C. Hofmann (Univ. of Dayton)
J.C. Herr (Univ. of Virginia)
P. Reddi (Univ. of Virginia)
J.A. Guttman (Univ. of British Columbia)

DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR OF CARTILAGE AND BONE

Monday, April 19, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Linda Sandell (Washington Univ. School of Medicine)
F. Long (Washington Univ. Medical School)
T.A. Franz-Odendaal (Dalhousie Univ.)
F.F. Safadi (Temple Univ. School of Medicine)
Z. Huang (Washington Univ.)
R.M. Williams (Cornell Univ.)
L.J. Sandell (Washington Univ.)
D. Dean (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
P.K. Kirui (Jackson State Univ.)

GLIAL CELL BIOLOGY

Sunday, April 18, 11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: George DeVries (Hines VA Hospital)
T.M. Markus (Hines VA Hospital)
P.R. Lee (NICHD, NIH)
D.E. Weinstein (GliaMed., Inc)
M.E. Dailey (Univ. of Iowa)

HEART DEVELOPMENT

Tuesday, April 20, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Joey Barnett (Vanderbilt University)
S.M. Manisastry (Univ. of S. Florida-Children 's Research Institute)
J. Desgrosellier (Vanderbilt Univ.)
M.J.B. van den Hoff (Univ. of Amsterdam , Academic Medical Center)
S. Somi (Univ. of Amsterdam , Academic Medical Center)
A.T. Soufan (Univ. of Amsterdam , Academic Medical Center)
R.L. Goodwin (Univ. of South Carolina)
B. Xu (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
S.M. Thaiparambil (SUNY Downstate)

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

Tuesday, April 20, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Samuel Marquez (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
L.A. Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry)
G. Huang (Univ. of Pennsylvania )
J.D. Roberts (Baylor College of Dentistry)
S. Marquez (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
D.P. Erstejn (SUNY Downstate Medical Center )
G. Mann (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
S. Iseki (Kanazawa Univ. , Japan)

NEURODEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION

Monday, April 19, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Chi-Bin Chien (Univ. of Utah Medical Center)
M.S. Rao (NIA, NIH)
D.R. Hyde (Univ. of Notre Dame)
M. Granato (Univ. of Pennsylvania )
B.L. Patton (Oregon Health and Science Univ.)
F. d'Autreaux (Columbia Univ.)
J.L. Unger (Northeastern Ohio Univ. College of Medicine)
M.D. Kawaja (Queen's Univ.)

NEUROIMMUNE INTERACTIONS AND DISEASE

Sunday, April 18, 10:30 - 11:30 am
Co-chairs: Craig Serpe (Hines VA Hospital) and Susanna Byram (Univ. of Chicago)
C.A. DeBoy (Loyola Univ. Medical Center)
M.J. Carson (Scripps Research Institute)
L. Ulloa (North Shore-LIJ Research Institute)
S.W. Levison (Penn State College of Medicine)

POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE (PKD): FROM CILIA TO CYST

Tuesday, April 20, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Vince Gattone (Indiana University School of Medicine)
Supported by an educational grant from the PKD Foundation
B.K. Yoder (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham )
N.S. Murcia (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
W. Liu (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
A. Wandinger-Ness (Univ. of New Mexico)
C.L. Phillips (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
V.H. Gattone (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
V.E. Torres (Mayo Clinic)

REGULATORY RNAS

Wednesday, April 21, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Kerby Oberg (Loma Linda Univ.)
Supported by educational grants from New England Biolabs, Inc. and Invitrogen Life Technologies
A.G. Dillin (Salk Institute for Biological Studies)
H.A. Cook (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
H. Lickert (Samuel Luenfeld Research Institute)
V. Mangal (NIH, NHLBI)
R.S. Hartley (Univ. of New Mexico)
C. Zhang (Florida Atlantic Univ.)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS: COMPUTER ASSISTED TEACHING & LEARNING

Monday, April 19, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Chair: Rochelle Cohen (University of Illinois at Chicago) and Robert Klein (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
D.A. Morton (Univ. of Utah)
A. Hagge-Greenberg (SUNY Downstate Medical Center )
R.E.E. Omaña (Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo León)
T. Bacro (Medical Univ. of South Carolina )
R.E. Fisher (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine)
R.W. Ogilvie (Medical Univ. of South Carolina )
K.B. Foreman (Univ. of Utah)
M. Hendrix (Southwest Missouri State Univ.)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS: TEACHERS & COURSE DELIVERY

Tuesday, April 20, 8:00 - 10:00 am
Chair: Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ. School of Medicine) and Anna Lysakowski (Univ. of Illinois At Chicago)
L.J. Rizzolo (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
R.H. Whitworth (Louisiana State Univ.)
C.M. Eckel (Univ. of Utah )
N.S. Vasan (UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School )
M. Nielsen (Univ. of Utah )
M.A. Terrell (Indiana Univ-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis )

TEACHING MEDICAL IMAGING

Sunday, April 18, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah Health Science Center)
J.S. Reidenberg (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
S.J. Phillips (Temple Univ. School of Medicine)
F. Lau (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
J.A. McNulty (Loyola Univ., Chicago )
K.B. Foreman (Univ. of Utah)
D.A. Morton (Univ. of Utah)

VASCULOGENESIS/ANGIOGENESIS

Tuesday, April 20, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Chair: Ronald J. Torry (Drake Univ.)
G.C. Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
J.B. Hoying (Univ. of Arizona)
K.R. Kidd (NICHD, NIH)
L. Francis (Univ. of Utah)
P.A. Rupp (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
J. Torres-Vazquez (NICHD, NIH)
E.I. Dedkov (Univ. of Iowa)

POSTER TOPICS

  • ANATOMICAL FORM AND FUNCTION
  • ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS
  • ANIMAL MODELS OF DISEASE
  • BONE AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE
  • CARDIAC PACEMAKING AND CONDUCTION SYSTEM*
  • CARDIOCASCULAR
  • CELL MIGRATION/MOTILITY
  • EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX
  • GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
  • HISTOCHEMISTRY
  • IMAGING & MICROSCOPY
  • NEUROBIOLOGY
  • REPRODUCTION
  • SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION
  • STEM CELLS
  • VASCULAR BIOLOGY
American Association of Anatomists

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