2005 Annual Meeting

LECTURES

Keynote Speaker
Betty Pace – University of Texas at Dallas
Sunday, April 3, 6:00 - 7:00 PM, Room 22
Sickle Cell Disease: The Promising Path to a Universal Cure

Supported by  JEOL USA, Inc. through the AACBNC
Organized by Steven R. Goodman
President-Elect of the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology Chairpersons (AACBNC)

The discovery of a molecular basis for sickle cell disease by Linus Pauling in 1949 ushered in a new era of molecular medicine. Over half a century later our pursuit of a gene therapy cure continues. The most promising approach has been fetal hemoglobin induction by drug therapy. Research efforts to ascertain the molecular mechanisms for drug-mediated gamma gene activation provided the impetus for an expanded focus in the field of globin gene regulation. Several research laboratories, including ours, have identified key DNA regulatory elements and transcription factors required to produce effective gene-therapy-based strategies to treat sickle cell disease. Being equipped with exciting new research tools in the “human genome era” will speed the process to diversify gene therapy strategies for improved vector delivery systems, alternate approaches such as antisense or RNA interference molecules. Those who choose to travel the road to cure will share in the prize to be attained in the not to distant future.

R.R. Bensley Award Lecture in Cell Biology
Ana Maria Cuervo - Albert Einstain College of Medicine
Sunday, April 3, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, Room 22
Lysosomes and Aging: The Importance of Maintaining Clean Cells
Damaged and abnormal proteins accumulate in most cells and tissues with age, and these protein deposits are deleterious to cellular function. Protein accumulation results in part from the failure of the systems that normally take care of their removal. Our studies have focused primarily in one of these removal systems, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which mediates selective targeting of cytosolic proteins to lysosomes for their degradation. CMA is active in most cell types in mammalians but its activity varies from cell type to cell type and also depending on cellular conditions. Maximal activation of CMA is attained during stresses such as nutritional stress, mild-oxidative stress or toxin exposure. Degradation via this pathway requires the presence of a targeting motif in the substrate protein, a set of cytosolic and lysosomal chaperones and a receptor protein at the lysosomal membrane. CMA activity declines with age and in some age-related pathologies such as familial forms of Parkinson's disease. Blockage of CMA in culture cells diminishes their ability to adapt to most types of stresses and promotes formation of protein aggregates. Using this model, we have also learnt about the cross-talk among different removal systems, since in response to diminished CMA activity, cells activate other forms of autophagy that contribute to compensate temporarily for CMA failure. However, replacement of the highly selective CMA with these less selective mechanisms has detrimental consequences for cell functioning. We have identified the reason for the decline in CMA function with age as a decrease in the levels of the lysosomal receptor that mediates substrate translocation. Our group is currently developing different approaches aimed to restore normal CMA activity in old rodents. These models would help us evaluate the importance of maintaining proper protein removal until advanced ages.

C.J. Herrick Award Lecture in Neuroanatomy
Kenneth Catania - Vanderbilt University
Tuesday, April 5, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, Room 22
General Principles from Specialized Species: What Star-Nosed Moles tell us about Brains, Behavior, and Evolution
In my laboratory we have been investigating specialized mammal species with the goal of determining general principles of brain organization and evolution.  The star-nosed mole has been the focus of a number of our studies as this mammal has an extraordinary sense of touch.  This includes a mechanosensory star with a tactile fovea that parallels features of visual system organization in other species.  The brain of the star-nosed mole is correspondingly specialized with enlarged and modular somatosensory areas in the neocortex where touch information is processed.  I will review our findings in this species and touch on the relationship between behavior and cortical maps, specialized and convergent features of brain organization in moles and other species, and lastly clues from embryology, behavior, and the environment that reveal the likely mode and selective pressure for the evolution of the star.

H.W. Mossman Award Lecture in Developmental Biology
Susan E. Mango - University of Utah
Monday, April 4, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, Room 22
Making and Shaping the Digestive Tract
The goal of our research is to understand how the foregut is formed during development. Our focus is C. elegans, whose digestive tract is a relatively simple, linear tube. We would like to understand i) the transcriptional regulatory hierarchies that dictate how cells are specified to become one of seven cell types within the foregut and ii) how those cells are organized into an epithelial tube. Using a combination of genomics, genetics and molecular biology, we have identified key regulatory molecules for foregut organogenesis, including the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4 for cell fate specification and the kinesin ZEN-4/MKLP1 for morphogenesis.

DEVELOPMENT OF SENSORY SYSTEMS MINI-MEETING

Chairs: Chi-Bin Chien (Univ. of Utah) and Monica Vetter (Univ. of Utah)
Supported by an educational grants from the March of Dimes, Open Biosystems and Olympus Microscopes
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics

 

REGIONAL IDENTITY & INDUCTION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS

Sunday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 23
Linda Barlow (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center)
Development of Taste Buds
Suzanne Mansour (Univ. of Utah)
Development of the Ear
John Rubenstein (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Development of Olfactory Bulb
Ilaria Rebay (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Development of the Fly Eye

 

NEUROGENESIS IN SENSORY SYSTEMS

Sunday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 23
David Raible (Univ. of Washington)
Development of Cranial Ganglia
Qiufu Ma (Harvard Medical School)
Specification of DRGs
Jim Posakony (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Development of Fly Mechanoreceptors
Monica Vetter (Univ. of Utah)
Fate Specification in the Vertebrate Retina

 

AXON GUIDANCE & SYNAPTOGENESIS IN SENSORY DEVELOPMENT

Monday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 23
Peter Mombaerts (Rockefeller Univ.)
Olfactory Axon Pathfinding
Tom Clandinin (Stanford Univ.)
Target Recognition in the Fly Visual System
Chi-Bin Chien (Univ. of Utah)
Retinal Axon Pathfinding
Stephen Smith (Stanford Univ.)
Synaptogenesis in the Retinotectal System

 

CELL MIGRATION & POLARITY DURING SENSORY DEVELOPMENT

Monday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 23
Tatjana Piotrowski (Univ. of Utah)
Migration in the Lateral Line
Fen-Biao Gao (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Drosophila Dendritic Development
Jarema Malicki (Harvard/MEEI)
Development of Retinal Lamination
Matt Kelley (NIDCD)
Planar Polarity in Ear Development

 

STUDENT AWARD PLATFORM SESSIONS

PRESLEY-ZEISS POSTDOC AWARD PRESENTATION
Saturday, April 2, 3:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24AB
Karen Lunde (Univ. of Freiburg)
Overexpression of dominant activator and repressor variants of maternally and zygotically expressed zebrafish pou5f1/pou2, homolog of mammalian Oct4, affects dorsoventral patterning
Bing Ye (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Genetic analysis of the differential development of dendrite and axon in Drosophila peripheral neurons
Evan Zamir (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Image-based computational analysis of vascular network deformation during early avian vaculogenesis

 

LANGMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATION

Saturday, April 2, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, Room 24AB
Armand Balboni (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Comparative Analysis of the petro-occipital fissure in humans and rats: Implications for understanding the anatomy of age-related hearing loss
Lee Greer (Loma Linda Univ.)
HOX mediated regulation of the FGF pathway in the human melanoma cell line (A375)
Richard Peterson (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Identification and characterization of versican as a downstream target of Prx1 during limb chondrogenesis
Sarah Taylor (Loma Linda Univ.)
Lmx1b upregulates Emx2 during dorsoventral limb patterning
J. Matthew Velkey (Univ. of Michigan)
Neuronal differentiation and subtype specification following inducible expression of Neurogenin-1 in mouse embryonic stem cells
Jamie Wikenheiser (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Differential levels of oxygen tension in the developing chicken heart

 

IMAGING WORKSHOPS

IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENT: (BIO)MOVIE STARS - PUTTING CELLS IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Saturday, April 2, 3:30 - 6:00 PM, Room 22
Chair: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Constant advances in imaging technology are offering unique access to in vivo events in embryogenesis. Many methods now allow much more than a peripheral view of mutant phenotypes, focusing in on cellular and subcellular phenomena with the hope of gaining insight into molecular mechanisms involved in sculpting morphogenesis. The speakers will present a wide range of imaging modalities, ranging from (rapid) confocal and multiphoton, multispectral imaging, to magnetic resonance and ultrasound biomicroscopy. The methods are innovatively adapted to the study of cardiovascular and craniofacial diseases, cell communication and cancer. Featured topics will include: studies of abnormal hemodynamics in mice with cardiac defects, how mechanical forces influence endothelial cells, manganese-enhanced MR imaging of mouse brain development, photoactivatable GFP as a single cell marker in live embryos, and analyzing cellular dynamics in avians and Drosophila.
Dan Kiehart (Duke Univ.)
Imaging Drosophila Development
Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Imaging Chick Neural Development
Dan Turnbull (New York Univ. School of Medicine)
Imaging Mouse Development
Mary Dickinson (California Institute of Technology)
Imaging Mouse Cardiovascular Development

 

MOLECULAR IMAGING IN LIVING ANIMALS

Saturday, April 2, 12:30 - 3:00 PM, Room 22
Chair: Qian Chen (Rhode Island Hospital)
The field of biological imaging is rapidly progressing in recent years. In vivo molecular imaging combines molecular/cell biology and chemistry/imaging technologies, and provides visualization of biological processes in space and time in a non-invasive manner. It reveals in vivo biological information including gene expression patterns, enzyme activities, mutant phenotypes, protein subcellular localization and trafficking, and tissue pathogenesis. This workshop will discuss the usage, prospect, and challenge of this state-of-the-art technology. Featured topics will include: in vivo imaging of enzyme activities including extracellular matrix metalloproteinases, in toto imaging of embryonic development with emphasis on image analysis and informatics, in vivo imaging of gene expression in transgenic animals using reporter genes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and firefly luciferase, and imaging approaches to studying animal models of diseases including cancer and other metabolic diseases.
Sean Megason (California Institute of Technology)
In Toto Imaging of Development
Ching-Hsuan Tung (Harvard Medical School)
In Vivo Imaging of Enzymes
Michael Dustin (New York Univ.)
In Vivo Imaging Approaches in Animal Models of Disease
Jian Q. Feng (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City)
In Vivo Imaging of Gene Expression

 

EDUCATION AND TEACHING TRACK

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Monday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24AB
Supported by an educational grant from Elsevier Science USA

ANATOMICAL SCIENCES DE NOVO WORKSHOP
Saturday, April 2, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24AB
Breakfast is supported by an edcuational grant from A.D.A.M. Inc.
Chair: Andrew Payer (Florida State Univ.)
Workshop leaders will guide small teams of participants in collaborating to build an ideal new medical school anatomical sciences curriculum from scratch, without limitations in funding and resources. The workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to share their knowledge and diverse experiences in a forum that focuses more on building new bridges than on decrying old roadblocks.
Workshop Leaders:
Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Douglas Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Andrew Payer (Florida State Univ.)
William Ovalle (Univ. of British Columbia)

 

BASIC & CLINICAL CONCEPT INTEGRATION IN HISTOLOGY

Tuesday, April 5, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Histology comprises a highly integrative corpus of biomedical information traditionally taught in a small, but separate, course. Because its topical boundaries are somewhat blurry, covering physiologic and pathologic concepts to reinforce microscopic structure, histology has lent itself well to integration. Many integrative approaches have been used, but discussions of their strengths and weaknesses have taken place mainly within the institutions where they occur. This symposium provides a broader forum for discussing integrative principles and lessons learned. Topics covered include: integration with other anatomical sciences and physiology within the first year medical curriculum; histology's role in problem-based learning; pathology concepts appropriate for introduction and concept reinforcement in histology; and the role of clinicians in histology teaching. The presentations will be followed by an open forum in which the audience can further explore the issues raised and share their own experiences.
Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Human Morphology: Integrating Histology, Gross Anatomy and Embryology in a Single Course
C. Darrell Jennings (Univ. of Kentucky)
Pathologic Structure Function Relationships in Histology Education
John Hansen (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine)
Student-centered Learning: Integrated Approach to Human Structure-function Relationships
Wojciech Pawlina (Mayo Clinic and Medical School)
Approaches to Integrating Clinical Faculty in the Teaching of Histology

 

ENDANGERED SPECIES: WHO WILL TEACH ANATOMY IN 2010?

Monday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chairs: Kurt Albertine and Christine Eckel (Univ. of Utah)
Co-sponsored by the American Association of Clinical Anatomists
Teachers of histology, embryology, gross anatomy, and neuroanatomy (“the anatomies”) at U.S. medical schools are, for the most part, from the baby boomer generation who are approaching retirement age. How many will be retiring? Who will replace them? Are the replacements being trained to teach? Will the replacements receive credit for teaching as part of their faculty evaluation for promotion and tenure? These specific questions will be addressed by a group of invited speakers. Context will be provided by reporting the latest manpower survey conducted by the AAA. A dean's perspective will be given about the importance of teaching to the mission of medical schools and approaches to recruit and retain teachers. Other speakers will address issues about graduate training (medical anatomy, anthropology), teaching expertise (histology, embryology, gross anatomy, neuroanatomy), and teaching location ( U.S., non-U.S. [Africa]).
Robert McCuskey (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine)
Availability of Trained Anatomists Now and in the Future?
Darrell Kirch (Penn State College of Medicine)
A Dean's Perspective on the Faculty: Where are the Teachers of the Future?
Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah)
Training Programs for Preparing Teacher-Scholars of Anatomy
Valerie O'Loughlin (Indiana Univ.)
Biological Anthropologists: Tomorrow's Anatomy Educators?
Nirusha Lachman (Durban Institute of Technology, South Africa)
Perspectives on the Evolution of the Anatomist

 

CSI SAN DIEGO: APPLIED ANATOMY IN PHYSICAL & FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Sunday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24AB
Chair: Gregory Buck (Texas A&M Univ., Corpus Christi)
This timely session promises to yield much information on how anatomy can be applied to forensic work and how the reality of anatomy applications differs from the popular images seen on network programs. David Glassman will discuss how skeletal anatomy can be used in identification of humans. Mark Teaford will talk about possible job opportunities in physical anthropology and forensics. Harrell Gill-King will describe how visual human anatomy can be used in forensic anthropology.
Harrell Gill-King (Univ. of North Texas)
Applications of Human Anatomy in Forensic Anthropology: A Visual Survey
David Glassman (Univ. of Southern Indiana)
Skeletal Anatomy in Human Identification
Mark Teaford (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine)
Is the Grass Always Greener? Job Opportunities in Physical Anthropology & Forensics

 

ANATOMY EDUCATION: TEACH NOW OR PAY LATER

Tuesday, April 5, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Co-sponsored by the American Association of Clinical Anatomists
Anatomy education must continue its evolution! With reduced hours, it's futile to try and “cover it all” in the first year. The future resides in ‘Integrating anatomy throughout the curriculum' and beyond. Not moving in this direction will lead to the use of residency anatomy courses as remediation or, worse, the final two words in the title of this symposium. Speakers will discuss: 1) a new first year case-directed approach to anatomy education that is the initial step in a comprehensive longitudinal anatomy curriculum, 2) the combined efforts of anatomists and clinicians to plan and implement an anatomy curriculum that is integrated into the four years of the medical school curriculum, and 3) the continuation of anatomy education into residency programs that stress relevant information focused on the needs of the audience. Each of these programs prepares the student for and fosters life-long learning of anatomy.
Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Case-Directed Anatomy: A New Beginning
Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Preparing Students for a Career of Learning: Use of Highly Interactive Computer Design to Integrate Clinical Cases with Anatomical Dissection
Anne Gilroy (Univ. of Massachusetts)
A Longitudinal Program in Clinical Anatomy

 

INTEGRATIVE MASTER CLASS: CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

Saturday, April 2, 12:30 - 3:00 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Restructuring of anatomy departments, the shortage of “classically-trained” anatomists, a reduction in the number of hours dedicated to anatomical instruction, and an ever-increasing demand for integration of clinical information are part of the changing environment in which anatomy faculty find themselves. This symposium is the second in a new series designed to provide opportunities for experienced anatomists, non-classically trained anatomists, and clinicians to refresh and improve their integrative knowledge of specific anatomical regions or systems. Featured topics include focused reviews of the anatomy and histology of the heart and blood vessels emphasizing surface landmarks and imaging; a synopsis of the critical phases in the formation of the heart, focusing on the clinical implications of common cardiac malformations; and key concepts in vascular biology. The symposium will conclude with a presentation of case-based cardiovascular problems that integrate the anatomical sciences into their solutions.
Gary Kolesari (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Anatomy & Histology of the Cardiovascular System
Dave Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Development of the Heart
Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
Vascular Biology in the Curriculum
Anne Gilroy (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center)
Clinical Anatomy of the Cardiovascular System

 

REFRESHER COURSE: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS & BIRTH DEFECTS

Sunday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: Suzzette Chopin (Texas A&M Univ., Corpus Christi)
Although birth defects result from genetic, environmental and unknown causes, it is frequently difficult to characterize the precise etiology. Genetic factors have been identified in 11% of birth defects, and environmental causes have been implicated in 7-10%. The remaining proportion is ascribed to unknown causes, which may include an environmental agent acting on a susceptible genome or a susceptible genome being acted upon by toxicant under certain nutritional conditions. Ascribing teratogenecity to an environmental toxicant is difficult because exposure must be correlated with dose, route of exposure and time of exposure. These correlations help determine the mechanism of action of a teratogen, which may act on cells directly or indirectly through cell signaling. In addition to the etiology and mechanisms of birth defects, the speakers will discuss folic acid responsive neural tube defects and life style factors such as alcohol, smoking and illicit drugs.
Robert Brent (Jefferson Medical College)
The Five Principles of Teratology
Lynda Fawcett (Jefferson Medical College)
Mechanisms of Teratology
Richard Finnell (Texas A&M Univ.)
Genetic Basis of Susceptibility to Environmentally Induced Birth Defects
T.V.N. Persaud (Univ. of Manitoba)
Drugs, Alcohol and Cigarette Smoking

 

SYMPOSIA

ANATOMICAL SCIENCES DE NOVO WORKSHOP
See Education & Teaching Track

ANATOMY EDUCATION: TEACH NOW OR PAY LATER
See Education & Teaching Track

 

ANATOMY OF THE NUCLEUS

Monday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 1:00 PM, Room 24C
Chair: John Lough (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
The orderly replication and expression of the genome's up to three billion base pairs of DNA are crucial processes for maintaining normal states of cellular growth and differentiation. How this mass of DNA and its attendant protein are non-randomly packaged within eukaryotic nuclei in a fashion permitting such finely tuned regulation constitutes perhaps the most intriguing question in cell biology today. Six investigators utilizing a variety of state-of-the-art molecular and imaging strategies will address current issues in this field, ranging from how the nuclear envelope/pore complex delimits nuclear contents while permitting selective entry/egress of proteins and RNAs, to how chromatin architecture has evolved to accommodate dynamic and structural changes of gene domains that accompany modulating states of gene expression and repression.
Douglass Forbes (Univ. of California at San Diego)
The Cell Nucleus: Building the Walls & Gates
Jim Holaska (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine)
Filament Networks & Membrane Proteins: Functional Architectures of the Nuclear Envelope
Robert Goldman (Northwestern Univ.)
Nuclear Lamins: Major Concepts of Nuclear Anatomy & Function
Jeanne Lawrence (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
Mapping the Interphase Nucleus: Genome Organization in Euchromatic & Heterochromatic Neighborhoods
Stefan Mueller (Ludwig Maximilians Universität, Germany)
The Third Dimension of Primate Genome Evolution: From Chromosomes to Nuclear Architecture
David Spector (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory)
The Dynamics of Gene Expression

 

CSI SAN DIEGO: APPLIED ANATOMY IN PHYSICAL & FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

See Education & Teaching Track

 

BASIC & CLINICAL CONCEPT INTEGRATION IN HISTOLOGY

See Education & Teaching Track

 

CELL MATRIX INTERACTION IN WOUND HEALING: THE ROLE OF MYOFIBROBLASTS

Tuesday, April 5, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 23
Co-chairs: Kathy Svoboda and Yiyu Fang (Baylor College of Dentistry)
This symposium will bring together specialists in the area of tissue repair with regard to myofibroblast cell biology. The purpose of the symposium is to discuss new information about cell-extracellular matrix interactions, cell migration, myofibroblast differentiation and role in wound healing and scar formation. In addition, the role of signaling proteins will be explored in cell migration, wound healing, actin reorganization and myofibroblast differentiation. Finally, a paper will be presented that demonstrates myofibroblast differentiation may be inhibited in the presence of nicotine.
Keith Burridge (Univ. of North Carolina)
Signal Transduction Events During Fibroblast Cell Migration
James Tomasek (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Science Center)
Actin Isoform Expression & Function in Myofibroblast-mediated Tissue Remodeling
Sandra Masur (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
Phenotype Switching Between Fibroblasts & Myofibroblasts During Cornea Wound Healing
Yiyu Fang (Texas A&M Univ.)
Myofibroflast Role in Gingival Wound Healing

 

CELLULAR PATHWAYS IN NEURODEGENERATION

Monday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 23
Chair: Joseph Besharse (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Co-sponsored by The Association for Research in Vision Ophthalmology
Analysis of genetic factors in neurodegenerative diseases has identified fundamental cellular pathways underlying pathology.  This symposium focuses on well-defined cellular pathways and how their disruption is informative in understanding degenerative disease in photoreceptors and CNS neurons.
Joseph Besharse (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Ciliary Trafficking of Phototransduction Components and Photoreceptor Degeneration
Richard Vallee (Columbia Univ.)
Role of Cytoplasmic Dynein in Smooth Brain and Other Neuronal Diseases
Lawrence Goldstein (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Molecular Motor Pathways and Neurodegeneration
Dean Bok (UCLA School of Medicine)
Rescue of Photoreceptors by Virus-vectored Genes in Animal Models of Inherited Human Retinal Disease

 

COMPARATIVE ANIMAL MODELS FOR STUDYING BONE & CARTILAGE MORPHOGENESIS & GROWTH

Tuesday, April 5, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 24C
Co-chairs: Lynne Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry) and Richard Peterson (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Co-sponsored by the AAA Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Different animal models provide specific advantages for studying early development and growth. Some animal models allow access to embryos because they develop outside of the mother as in chick embryos, and because the embryos are translucent, allowing visualization of developing internal organs, as in zebrafish embryos. Mammalian models have the advantage of sharing closer homology with human embryonic development. Topics in this symposium demonstrate how different animal models have led to fundamental paradigm shifts in our understanding of development of embryonic branchial arch structures and the maxilla, and how genes across species or across strains within species differentially regulate bone and cartilage morphogenesis.
Joy Richman (Univ. of British Columbia)
New Paradigm for the Cellular Origin of the Chick Maxilla
Stefan Judex (SUNY at Stony Brook)
Genetic and Epigenetic Influences on Bone Quantity and Quality
Olena Jacenko (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Differential Regulation of the Chick Type X Collagen Sequence in Mouse Cartilage
Pamela Yelick (Harvard School of Dental Medicine)
Formation of Zebrafish Branchial Arch Structures

 

CONTRACTILE MACHINERY: STRUCTURE, FUNCTION, & REMODELING

Sunday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 22
Co-chairs: Carol Gregorio (Univ. of Arizona) and Patrick Nahirney (NIH, NIAMS) and Donald Fischman (Cornell Univ.)
Just over 50 years ago, the sliding filament model was proposed to explain the mechanisms responsible for striated muscle contraction. Since that time, the field has made tremendous strides in our knowledge of how actomyosin interactions lead to efficient contractile activity; however, a plethora of unanswered questions remain concerning muscle function. Discoveries in striated muscle continue to have broad implications for general cell function in most, if not all cell types. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are pioneer model systems to explore a host of cellular processes including cell motility and intracellular trafficking processes. This is in part, due to the nearly crystalline organization of contractile proteins within a myofiber that allows for extraordinary resolution at the level of each sarcomere.
The focus of this session will be on current investigations that are providing novel insights into the mechanisms governing striated muscle function: 1) establishment of the giant muscle proteins (e.g., nebulin) as critical components of the contractile apparatus; 2) identification of molecules (e.g., Muscle-LIM proteins) responsible for directly linking myofibrillar biomechanical signals to the regulation of muscle gene expression; 3) establishment of the structural dynamics of actomyosin during filament sliding by single-molecule mechanics; and 4) current approaches to genetically engineer the sarcomere by gene transfer.
Joseph Metzger (Univ. of Michigan)
Acute Genetic Engineering of the Sarcomere by Gene Transfer
Mary Beckerle (Univ. of Utah)
Roles of LIM Proteins in Muscle
Abigail McElhinny (Univ. of Arizona)
Deciphering the Function of the Nebulous Giant in Striated Muscle
Yale Goldman (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Dynamics of Actomyosin by Single-molecule Mechanics & Fluorescence

 

DISSECTING THE BIOLOGICAL CLOCK

Sunday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 24C
Chair: James West (Texas A&M Univ.)
Chairpersons' Symposium
In animals, a variety of biological processes, such as gene transcription or translation, hormone production and sleep-wake behavior, undergo circadian or 24-hour fluctuations. The generation of these circadian rhythms and their synchronization to light-dark cycles are mediated by an internal biological clock located in the brain. Compromise of circadian clock function in maintaining temporal coordination of internal processes with each other and with the daily light-dark cycle is thought to impact on human health and performance. Speakers will discuss recent advances that have unveiled elements of the molecular clockworks in animals. Specific topics will include: links between the avian clock mechanism and neuroendocrine outputs, vulnerability of the clock machinery and its timekeeping function to alcohol during brain development, circadian function in mice with targeted disruptions of genes within the feedback loop and identification of genes that cause normal variations and disorders in the regulation of human circadian rhythms.
David Weaver (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Rhythms
Vincent Cassone (Texas A&M Univ.)
Functional Genomics of the Avian Circadian Clock
David Earnest (Texas A&M Univ.)
Developmental Alcohol and the Regulation of Circadian Rhythms
Louis Ptacek (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
A Human Genetic Approach to Circadian Behavior

 

DYNAMIC IMAGING OF ECM: CLUES AS TO ITS STRUCTURE & FUNCTION

Tuesday, April 5, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24C
Chair: Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
The purpose of the symposium is to convey the dynamic nature of ECM assembly and reorganization that occurs both in vitro and in vivo. Data presented will help elucidate specific roles for key ECM components in the assembly process in cultured cells and in the embryo. New approaches in cell and embryo culture techniques and hardware and software advances in time-lapse imaging that allow simultaneous observation of cell and ECM motion will be discussed. Use of computational methods relating ECM network assembly to cell motion in vitro and ongoing developmental events (segmentation, neurulation) will be presented.
Andras Czirok (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
The Dynamics of ECM Assembly in Early Avian Embryos
Bette Dzamba (Univ. of Virginia)
Assembly of ECM in Xenopus Embryos
Jessica Wagenseil (Washington Univ. School of Medicine)
Real-time Imaging of Elastic Fiber Assembly
Sarah Dallas (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City)
Dynamic Imaging of Matrix Assembly in Osteoblasts

 

EMBRYOGENESIS & THE EVOLUTION OF CRANIOFACIAL PATTERNING

Monday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 22
Chair: Pip Francis-West (King's College, London)
The head is probably one of the most complex and intricate structures of the vertebrate body. This is highlighted by the many distinct, and sometimes subtle, evolutionary adaptations between species and the high frequency in which craniofacial development is perturbed. In the higher vertebrate, craniofacial development also shows a number of unique features when compared with the rest of the body such as the ability of neural crest cells to give rise to hard tissue structures and the presence of placodes which contribute to the sensory organs. The speakers will discuss tissue and molecular interactions that control patterning and tissue differentiation of the face highlighting the novelty of craniofacial development and evolutionary differences between marsupial and placental mammals. In addition, new insight into the understanding of human craniofacial syndromes and how they may be treated with stem cell technology will be discussed.
Paul Trainor (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Neural Crest Cell Plasticity
Drew Noden (Cornell Univ.)
Head Mesoderm: Victims or Supporters of the Neural Crest
Pip Francis-West (King's College, London)
Regulation of Cranial Skeletogenesis
Kathleen Smith (Duke Univ.)
Craniofacial Patterning and the Evolution of Mammals

 

ENDANGERED SPECIES: WHO WILL TEACH ANATOMY IN 2010?

See Education & Teaching Track

 

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS & BIRTH DEFECTS

See Education & Teaching Track

 

EVOLUTION OF NEUROBIOLOGICAL SPECIALIZATIONS IN MAMMALS

Tuesday, April 5, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 23
Co-chairs: Lori Marino (Emory Univ.) and Patrick Hof (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
A comparative-evolutionary approach to neuroscience reveals that different mammal groups have their own distinctive neurobiological specializations which represent responses to specific evolutionary challenges.  By examining these neurobiological capacities we develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between brain structure, function, and evolution.  In this symposium the speakers will discuss an array of neurobiological specializations in mammals at multiple levels of analysis.  These topics include neurochemical specializations in various mammals, motor specializations in primates, sensory specializations in insectivores, and the architecture of large mammalian brains.
Patrick Hof (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
Cellular Specialization in the Mammalian Cerebral Cortex: Morphologies & Neurochemical Phenotypes
Chet Sherwood (Kent State Univ.)
Motor Specializations in Primate Brain Evolution
Jon Kaas (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Specializations of Sensory and Motor Systems in Primate Brains
Leah Krubitzer (Univ. of California, Davis)
How to Build Complex Brains

 

INTEGRATIVE MASTER CLASS: CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

See Education & Teaching Track

 

IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENT

See Imaging Workshops

 

INDUCTION & PATTERNING OF THE NEURAL CREST: LESSONS FROM FISH, FROGS & MICE

Tuesday, April 5, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 22
Co-chairs: Robert Cornell (Univ. of Iowa) and Eliska Krejci (Charles Univ., Prague)
The neural crest was dubbed the “fourth germ layer” by Brian Hall because of the broad developmental potential of neural crest cells (NCC). Early work in the field focused on evaluating the destination organ of NCC derived from different axial levels of the embryo. In recent years, spurred by the interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells, for which NCC serve as a model, workers have turned to identifying the genes that direct specification, proliferation, survival, and differentiation of NCC. Speakers in this symposium represent the many genetic techniques and model systems that have been applied to this question, including targeted gene disruption in mouse, forward mutagenesis screens in zebrafish, and molecular methodology in frogs. Today's presentations will focus on growth factor stimulated pathways, and the transcription factors that mediate their effects, in control of neural crest cell fate. In addition, the way that normal developmental pathways are co-opted in cancerous cellular transformation will be explored.
Carole LaBonne (Northwestern Univ.)
The Crossroads of Development & Cancer: A View from the Crest
David Raible (Univ. of Washington)
Neural Crest Cell Fate Specification in Zebrafish
Trevor Williams (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences)
Analysis of the Mouse AP-2 Genes: From Ectoderm to Neural Crest
Robert Cornell (Univ. of Iowa)
Multiple Roles for AP-2 Family Members in Zebrafish Neural Crest Development

 

NEW APPROACHES TO REGENERATION IN MAMMALS - Henry Gray Award Symposium

Tuesday, April 5, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 22
Chair: Bruce Carlson (Univ. of Michigan)
Supported by an educational grant from The University of Michigan, Department of Gerontology
The regeneration of many tissues and organs in mammals has long been viewed as an almost intractable problem, but recent years have seen major advances in this field. New technology and means of analysis have allowed the transference of lessons learned from the study of regeneration in lower vertebrates to mammals. Speakers will discuss the present status of limb, lens and muscle in this light. A fourth report will concentrate on the preparation and application of natural biomatrices as scaffolds supporting the regeneration of a variety of mammalian and human tissues.
Ken Muneoka (Tulane Univ.)
Regeneration of Higher Vertebrate Limbs: Developing a Roadmap
Shannon Odelberg (Univ. of Utah)
Regenerative Cellular Plasticity and its Potential Application in Mammals
Panagiotis Tsonis (Univ. of Dayton)
Induction of Lens Regeneration in Vertebrates
Stephen Badylak (McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine)
Xenogeneic Extracellular Matrix as a Bioscaffold for Tissue Reconstruction: Experiences in Humans

 

MOLECULAR IMAGING IN LIVING ANIMALS

See Imaging Workshops

 

ROLE OF MECHANICAL FACTORS IN VASCULAR GROWTH & REMODELING

Sunday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 22
Co-chairs: Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa) and Lily Francis (Univ. of Utah)
Mechanical factors (e.g., shear stress, stretch and pressure) constitute primary stimuli for angiogenesis and remodeling. New insights reveal important interactions between various vascular cells and the extracellular matrix. This symposium will address the events that evoke cellular and extracellular responses and lead to the activation of signaling molecules that facilitate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. The speakers will address growth factors and signaling events, integrins, arteriolar and artery remodeling, and the vascular responses in heart and skeletal muscle.
Gerald Meininger (Texas A&M Univ.)
Integrins-Extracellular Matrix & Mechanical Factors Related to Arterior Remodeling
B. Lowell Langille (Toronto General Hospital)
Arterial Remodeling in Three Dimensions: The Integration of Responses to Multiple Physical Forces
Wei Zheng (Univ. of Iowa)
Stretch-induced Growth Factor Activation in the Coronary & Vasculature
Margaret D. Brown (Univ. of Birmingham Medical School)
Capillary Growth in Skeletal Muscle Induced by Physical Forces

 

STEM CELLS IN THE ADULT EPIDERMIS

Sunday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24C
Co-chairs: Maya Sieber-Blum (Medical College of Wisconsin) and Milos Grim (Charles Univ., Prague)
Recent advances in stem cell biology show that diverse organs harbor stem cells, termed adult stem cells. The skin is the largest organ of the body, it turns over at a rapid rate and is thus dependent on the continued presence of stem cells. The speakers will discuss characteristics of various types of multipotent stem cells in the epidermis. This includes the plasticity of epidermal stem cells and how progressive age affects their characteristics, the ability of single stem cells to give rise to a new hair plus epidermis, the migration of epidermal stem cells in the hair follicle during the hair cycle, gene profiling of stem cells in the hair follicle, and the novel observation of neural crest stem cells in the epidermis of the adult hair follicle.
Jackie R. Bickenbach (Univ. of Iowa)
Aging Effects on Epidermal Stem Cells
Grigori Enikolopov (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory)
Neural Potential of Stem Cells in the Hair Follicle
Ariane Rochat (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
Hair Follicle Morphogenesis from Single Multipotent Stem Cells
Maya Sieber-Blum (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Neural Crest Stem Cells in the Adult Hair Follicle

 

SYSTEMS MORPHOGENETICS: PUTTING GENE FUNCTION INTO CONTEXT

Monday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24C
Chair: Keith Cheng (Penn State College of Medicine)
One of the most exciting challenges in biology in the post-genomic era is the possibility of providing comprehensive biological context for gene function. Genes are being characterized by function through the generation of mutants across multiple model organisms. Normal and abnormal patterns of gene expression and function are also being probed using, immunological, reverse genetic, large-scale genomic, and bioinformatic methodologies. Additional contextual data that require integration include the anatomic, developmental, life-span, physiological, and behavioral. The speakers will utilize examples from the zebrafish, mouse, plant, and neurobiological arenas to address the issue of providing biological context for these types of data with respect to space, time, and function. Solutions and goals for dynamic, web-based solutions to these issues will be discussed.
Keith Cheng (Penn State College of Medicine)
Systems Morphogenetics: Providing Biological Context for Gene Function
Jonathan Bard (University of Edinburgh)
Anatomics: Integrating Anatomy with Molecular and Other Bioinformatics Resources
Hong Ma (Penn State College of Medicine)
Potential Contributions of Systems Morphogenetics to Plant Biology
Mark Ellisman (University of California, San Diego)
Integrative Roles for Grid Computing in the Life Sciences

 

PLATFORMS SESSIONS

AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.
Abstract submissions opens September 2004.

 

CARTILAGE & BONE

Tuesday, April 5, 8:00- 10:00 AM, Room 24C
Chair: Fanxin Long (Washington Univ. Medical School)
R.E. Peterson (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
H. Asahara (Scripps Research Institute)
M.S. Domowicz (Univ. of Chicago)
E.K. Harrington (Baylor College of Dentistry)
X.E. Yang (Baylor College of Medicine)
L.A. Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry)
H. Akiyama (Univ. of Texas)
F. Long (Washington Univ. Medical School )

 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY

Tuesday, April 5, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 23
Chair: Joy Reidenberg (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
G.M. Constantinescu (Univ. of Missouri)
Z.U. Rahman (Univ. of Agri)
A. Visioni (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
A. Balboni (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
L. Marino (Emory Univ.)
V.L. Naples (Northern Illinois Univ.)
R.E. Fisher (Midwestern Univ.)
J.D. Wolf (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)

 

CONNECTIVE TISSUE REGULATION OF PATHOGENESIS
CANCELLED

Chair: Mircea Ifrim (Univ. of Oradea, Romania)

 

DEVELOPMENT OF SENSORY SYSTEMS

Sunday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 23
Chair: Kathryn Moore (Univ. of Utah)
K.B. Moore (Univ. of Utah)
J.M. Fadool (Florida State Univ.)
B. Perkins (Texas A&M Univ.)
C-F. Chuang (The Rockefeller Univ.)
B. Ye (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
J. Holzschuh (Univ. of Freiburg)
G. Duester (Burnham Institute)
D.A. Feldheim (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz)

 

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

Monday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 22
Chair: Kerby Oberg (Loma Linda Univ.)
C.M. Krane (Univ. of Dayton)
T.J. Mauch (Univ. of Utah)
K.M. McHugh (Columbus Children's Research Institute)
S. Vadivelu (Des Moines Univ.)
D.E. Clouthier (Univ. of Louisville)
S.E. Taylor (Loma Linda Univ.)
P.R. Brauer (Creighton Univ.)
L.F. Greer (Loma Linda Univ.)

 

NEUROHORMONES AND THE DEVELOPING HEART

Monday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 22
Chair: Florence Rothenberg (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Supported by educational grants from VisualSonics, Inc. and the March of Dimes
S.N. Ebert (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center)
D. Chikaraishi (Duke Univ. Mediccal Center)
J.J-B. Mallet (CNRS)
V.A. Cameron (Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences)
J.C. Wikenheiser (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
M. Mercado-Pimentel (Univ. of Arizona)
B.P. Hierck (Leiden Univ. Medical Center)
G.F. Sferrazza (Florida Atlantic Univ.)

 

MATERNAL FACTORS IN VERTEBRATE DEVELOPMENT

Monday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24C
Co-chairs: Diane Slusarski (Univ. of Iowa) and Francisco Pelegri (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Supported by an educational grant from Aquatic Habitats
H. Nishida (Osaka Univ.)
J. Heasman (Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation)
R.S. Hartley (Univ. of New Mexico Health Science Center)
F.J. Pelegri ( Univ. of Wisconsin , Madison )
K. Lunde (Univ. of Freiburg)
C.M. Freisinger (Univ. of Iowa)
M.M. Matzuk (Baylor College of Medicine)
T. Kachi (Hirosaki Univ. School of Medicine)

 

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

Tuesday, April 5, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 22
Chair: Vladimir Mironov (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
P. Anversa (New York Medical College)
H. Masuda (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine)
J. Frank (NIH)
R. Doyonnas (Stanford Univ. Medical Center)
N. L'Heureux (Cytograft Tissue Engineering, Inc)
F. Oberpenning (Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine)
K. Jakab (Univ. of Missouri)
J.D. Potts (Univ. of South Carolina)

 

STEM CELLS

Sunday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24C
Chair: Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
M.B. Grant (Univ. of Florida)
G.C. Gurtner (New York Univ. School of Medicine)
M. Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
J. Lough (Medical College of Wisconsin)
E. Careaga (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of Medicine)
J.R. Sladek (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center)
J.M. Velkey (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)

 

STEREOLOGY AS A CRITICAL TOOL IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE

Saturday, April 2, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 22
Chair: Dallas Hyde (Univ. of California at Davis)
Co-sponsored by the International Society for Stereology
J.N. Maina (Univ. of the Witwatersrand)
C. Plopper (Univ. of California)
M. Ochs (Univ. of Goettingen)
D.M. Hyde (Univ. of California)
K.H. Albertine (Univ. of Utah)
H.J. Gundersen (Univ. of Aarhus, Denmark)

 

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY I

Monday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: Robert Trelease (UCLA School of Medicine)
F. Anderson (Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
V.P.S. Fazan (Univ. of Sao Paulo)
N.A. Granger (Univ. of North Carolina , Chapel Hill)
B. Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
C.M. Eckel (Univ. of Utah)
M. Terrell (Indiana Univ.)
T.R. Gest (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
S.S. Stensaas (Univ. of Utah)

 

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY II

Tuesday, April 5, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 24AB
Chair: Lawrence Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)
B.R. MacPherson (Univ. of Kentucky)
H. Amerongen (Univ. of Arizona)
S. Metten (Univ. of California , Los Angeles)
H.W. Lambert (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
K.B. Foreman (Univ. of Utah)
J.M. Burgoon (Univ. of North Carolina , Chapel Hill)
G.L. Todd (Univ. of Nebraska Medical School)
A. Sher (Case Western Reserve Univ.)

 

VASCULOGENESIS/ANGIOGENESIS

Sunday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 22
Chair: Charlie Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
J. A. Varner (Univ. of California, San Diego)
S Weis (The Scripps Research Institute)
F.A. le Noble (College de France)
B.L. Bohnsack (Baylor College of Medicine)
E.A. Zamir (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
J.D. Lewis (The Scripps Research Institute)
R. Forough (Texas A&M Univ. Health Science Center)
E.I. Dedkov (Univ. of Iowa)

 

VIRTUAL MICROSCOPY IN TEACHING HISTOLOGY

Sunday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 24AB
Chair: Robert Ogilvie (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Supported by educational grants from Microbrightfield, Aperio Technologies, Inc., and Nikon Instruments, Inc.
Lunch is supported by an educational grant from Bacus Laboratories, Inc.
R.W. Ogilvie (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
R.A. Bloodgood (Univ. of Virginia School of Medicine)
S.A. Scoville (Eastern Virginia Medical School)

 

POSTER TOPICS

AAA Poster Sessions are organized based on submitted abstracts. Authors are required to be at their posters from 12:30 – 2 p.m. on the day they are scheduled.

SUNDAY - April 3
ANATOMICAL FORM & FUNCTION
ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS
ANIMAL MODELS OF DISEASE
CARDIOVASCULAR
VASCULAR BIOLOGY

MONDAY - April 4
CELL BIOLOGY & SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
IMAGING & MICROSCOPY
MUSCLE
NEUROBIOLOGY
REPRODUCTION

TUESDAY - April 5
*DEVELOPMENT OF SENSORY SYSTEMS
STEM CELLS
BONE & CONNECTIVE TISSUE
LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACTS

American Association of Anatomists

9650 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20814-3998
Tel: 301-634-7910 | Fax: 301-634-7965

 

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