2006 Annual Meeting - San Francisco

April 1-5, 2006 - San Francisco, CA

Keynote Speaker

Judah Folkman, M.D. - Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery
and Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital
The Platelet Angiogenesis Proteome for Early Detection of Cancer

Supported by  JEOL USA, Inc. through the AACBNC

We report a novel function of platelets distinct from their hemostatic activity. We show1 that platelets selectively take up angiogenesis regulatory proteins secreted by human tumors in mice, including VEGF, bFGF, PDGF, PF4, endostatin, angiostatin, and others, depending on tumor type. The platelet accumulation of these proteins significantly exceeds their concentration in platelets from animals not bearing a tumor. Nanomolar quantities of VEGF incorporated into a Matrigel pellet implanted subcutaneously in a mouse, or VEGF secreted by a microscopic subcutaneous tumor (0.5 - 1 mm3), elevate VEGF levels in platelets, but not in plasma. After microscopic (< 1 mm3), non-angiogenic tumors switch to the angiogenic phenotype and grow to a sufficient tumor mass (~1 cm3), angiogenesis regulatory proteins which previously increased only in platelets, begin to appear in the plasma. The "platelet angiogenesis proteome" provides a stable, sensitive, and reliable biomarker for very early diagnosis of cancer, and for determining that tumors have switched to the angiogenic phenotype. If this biomarker can be validated in patients, it may be used in conjunction with other biomarkers to diagnose the recurrence of cancer years before such a minute tumor burden would become symptomatic, or could be anatomically located by conventional methods. It could also be used to diagnose a new primary tumor, for example in women with the mutated breast cancer gene who have not yet developed a clinically detectable cancer.
1. Klement G, Kikuchi L, Kieran M, Almog N, Yip T-T, & Folkman J. Blood, 2004,104:239a (abstract #839).

 

R.R. Bensley Award Lecture in Cell Biology

Clare Waterman-Storer - The Scripps Research Institute
Cytomechanical Systems Integration in Directed Cell Migration

The ability of tissue cells to directionally move is critical to development, the immune response and wound healing, and its regulation is compromised in metastatic cancer and vascular disease. Cells move directionally by a repeating cycle of protrusion of the cell edge in the direction of migration, formation of adhesion of the protrusion to the extracellular matrix, pulling against the adhesion for translocation of the cell body, and dissolution of adhesion sites at the trailing edge of the cell to allow advance. This necessitates complex and dynamic mechanical interactions between the cell and its extracellular environment that must be coordinated in space and time by physical and biochemical signals. Mechanical cell outputs are mediated in large part by the cytoskeletal systems, actin and microtubules, but also likely involve contributions from other organelle systems in the cell. Our lab uses quantitative microscopy of protein dynamics in living cells and in vitro biochemistry to understand how cytomechanical systems are integrated to promote the morphogenic activities that drive directed cell movement. We aim to understand how the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons interact to polarize a cell, how the actin cytoskeleton builds specific machines for distinct functions in cell migration, and how the acto-myosin contractile system interfaces with the extracellular matrix via focal adhesions to generate traction force. To aid our studies, we pioneered a method called quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (qFSM), which allows quantitative analysis of the dynamics of and interactions between proteins within macromolecular assemblies such as the cytoskeleton and focal adhesions in living cells.

H.W. Mossman Award Lecture in Developmental Biology

Alexander Schier - Harvard Univ.
The Molecular Genetics of Zebrafish Embryogenesis: From Nodal Signals to Micro RNAs

During early development, the embryo is faced with multiple challenges – the switch from maternally provided gene products to activating its own genome, the specification and patterning of tissue progenitors, and the rearrangement of cells to generate the embryonic axes. We have used genetics, molecular biology, embryology and in vivo imaging to address this problem in zebrafish. Our studies have revealed how the extracellular interplay of Nodal signals, EGF-CFC proteins and Lefty antagonists controls mesoderm and endoderm formation and left-right patterning in zebrafish. Nodal signals can act as morphogens and instruct cells to form mesoderm and endoderm and internalize; EGF-CFC proteins act as essential coreceptors in this process; and Lefty attenuates mesoderm and endoderm induction by blocking Nodal signaling. More recently, we have identified a microRNA that regulates the degradation of a large number of maternal mRNAs and facilitates the maternal to zygotic transition. I will discuss how the interplay of microRNAs and signaling molecules regulates early development.

STUDENT AWARD PLATFORM SESSIONS

LANGMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATION
Saturday, A 122/125pril 1, 3:30 - 5:00 PM
Chair: Rebecca Pratt (Grand Valley State Univ.)

R. W. Conley (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Concise Signs in Sign Language for Anatomical Terminology
M. J. Lipan (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
New Weapons in the War on Reflux: Creating a model of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux to Test a Novel Surgical Iimplant
W. J. Hucker (Washington Univ.)
A Multi-Imaging Approach to Study the Structure and Function of the Atrioventricular Junction
J. Rawlins (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Egf Rescues Tgf-ƒÒ2 Induced Fetal Rat Coronal Suture Synostosis
A. Ghaly (Dalhousie University)
Ischemia-reperfusion Modulates the Inflammatory and Regenerative Response to Muscle Contusion Injury
C. M. Freisinger (Univ. of Iowa)
Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Function in Zebrafish Development

PRESLEY-ZEISS POSTDOC AWARD PRESENTATION
Saturday, April 1, 5:30 - 6:30 PM
Chair: Brian Avery (Univ. of Western Ontario, Canada)

J. Lincoln (Cincinnati Children's Hospital)
Sox9 is Required for Heart Valve Remodeling
Y. F. Hu (Medical College of Wisconsin)
A Molecular Signature for Embryonic and Adult Neural Crest Stem Cells
C. Cui (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
New Empirical Cell Motion Data from Avian Gastrulae Reveal Striking Exceptions to "Classical" Concepts of Gastrulation
V. V. Fedorov (Washington Univ.)
Functional and Structural Optical Imagining of the Rabbit Sinoatrial Node

IMAGING WORKSHOPS

QUANTIFYING YOUR IMAGES: FROM MRI/CT/PET/CONFOCAL TO PETRI DISH IMAGES
Saturday, April 1, 12:30 - 3:00 PM
Chair: Dallas M. Hyde (Univ. of California, Davis)
Imaging modalities continue to expand and provide investigators with new ways of viewing organs, tissues, cells, and organelles. However, there are still basic sampling and stereological methods that need to be carefully applied to derive correct quantitative data from these new imaging modalities. This symposium will provide the basic sampling and stereological approaches to design-based quantitation using the new imaging modalities of PET/MRI, PET/CT, 1- and 2-photon microscopy and cell culture.

Simon Cherry (Univ. of California, Davis)
Quantitation of PET/CT & PET/MRI Images
Jonathan Gardi (Univ. of Aarhas, Denmark)
Counting Cells & Organelles in Organs & Tissues: An Exercise in Sampling
Jens Nyengaard (Univ. of Aarhus, Denmark)
Quantitating 1-photon & 2-photon Microscopic Images
Dallas Hyde (California National Primate Research Center)
Quantitating Live Cells and Explant Tissues in Culture: From Static to Chemotaxis

IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESSES
Saturday, April 1, 3:30 - 6:00 PM
Chair: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Innovations in in vivo imaging provide biologists with tools to test molecular function and discover new insights. This is primarily due to a clever blending of transgenic technology, new fluorescent constructs, and a careful marriage of imaging technology with embryo growth. The speakers in this session will present both their imaging designs and biological insights. Featured topics will include cardiovascular, skeletal, and brain development in mouse, chick, and zebrafish using hi-resolution light microscopy and MRI.

Cecilia Lo (NIH/NHLBI)
In Vivo Imaging of Mouse Cardiovascular Development and Disease by High Frequency Ultrasound
Kat Hadjantonakis (Sloan-Kettering Institute)
Seeing is Believing: Tools for Imaging Cell Dynamics in Mouse Embryos
Mark Cooper (Univ. of Washington)
Imaging and Visualization of Zebrafish Morphogenesis
Rusty Lansford (California Institute of Technology)
In Vivo Imaging of Avian Development

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE MINI-MEETING

Chair: Vladimir Mironov (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)

This 2-day mini-meeting will review the novel role of stem cells in tissue turnover and regeneration, identify important basic science issues, and demonstrate how understanding basic science principles can be translated into novel therapeutic and diagnostic modalities.

STEM CELLS FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Sunday, April 2, 8:00 - 10:00 AM

Chair: Marc Hedrick (Macropore Biosurgery Inc.)
Regenerative medicine could be defined as applied stem cell, regenerative, and developmental biology. The stem cell is the keystone of the ongoing regenerative medicine revolution. Both embryonic and adult stem cells demonstrate potential for effective applications in regenerative medicine. However, effective clinical translation must be based on systematic studies of stem cell biology, tissue turnover, and regeneration, as well as on understanding the mechanisms of integration of implanted cells into pre-existing tissues and organs. This session focuses on different types of stem cells and their application in regenerative medicine.

Marc Hedrick (Macropore Biosurgery Inc.)
Fat Derived Stem Cells
Henry Young (Mercer Univ.)
Adult Stem Cells
Lola Reid (North Carolina State Univ.)
The Human Liver Stem Cell Compartment
Kohei Johkura (Shinshu Univ. School of Medicine, Japan)
Proliferation and Tissue Organization of Human ES Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes
Mari Dezawa (Kyoto Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Japan)
Specific Iinduction of Schwann Cells, Neurons and Skeletal Muscle Cells from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Application for Degenerative Diseases

BIOMIMETIC MATRICES FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Sunday, April 2, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Chair: Kevin Healy (Univ. of California at Berkeley)
Regenerative medicine is impossible without effective cell delivery. It is obvious that designing an optimal microenvironment is critical for successful cell therapy and cell transplantation. Injectable tissue engineering is based on employing intelligent hydrogels or functional biomimetic matrices. Functional matrices from modified natural polymers closely mimick natural components of extracellular matrix and even have some additional advantages because they are designed as stimuli-sensitive or smart hydrogels. This session focuses on the application of biomemetic matrices in regenerative medicine.

Andreas Zisch (Univ. of Zurich, Switzerland)
Biomimetic Materials for Injectable Tissue Engineering: Studies of Acute, Lasting and Unexpected Angiogenesis Response
Hyun-Joon Kong (Harvard Univ.)
Functionalizing Hydrogels to Regulate Cellular Phenotype
Glenn Prestwich (Univ. of Utah)
In SITU Crosslinkable Synthetic Extracellular Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Repair
Kevin Healy (Univ. of California at Berkeley)
Temperature-sensitive Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering

ENDOTHELIAL-MESENCHYMAL TRANSFORMATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Sunday, April 2, 2:30 - 4:30 PM. Room 121
Chair: Joyce Bischoff (Harvard Univ.)
Endothelial cell and tissue biology is a fundamental basic research field that is critically important for progress in cardiovascular

regenerative medicine. Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis are the current focus of research on endothelial cell and tissue biology. However, endothelial cells produce new blood vessel and proliferate in response to signals or injury. Endothelial-mesenchymal transformation and associated fibrosis are becoming recognized as potential pathogenetic mechanisms for many fibro-proliferative diseases. This session
focuses on the application of endothelial mesenchymal transformation to the emerging field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

Kurt Stenmark (Univ. of Colorado)
Perspectives on Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition
Michael Jonas (Harvard Univ.)
Cell Source in Stent Induced Restenosis
Joyce Bischoff (Harvard Univ.)
Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transformation in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering
Richard Visconti (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Recruitment & Fate of Circulated Stem Cells into Heart Valves

TISSUE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Monday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM
Chair: Vladimir Mironov (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Self-assembly is a fundamental biological process at all scales. Exploring principles of directed and even self-directed tissue self-assembly opens a unique opportunity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Many soft tissues and especially cell aggregates are not solid but rather visco-elastic fluid-like structures and they can flow and fuse. This session focuses on new emerging tissue engineering technologies for regenerative medicine based on principles tissue self-assembly.

Chris Drake (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Engineering Blood Vessels from Lumenized Vascular Tissue Spheroids
Michael Sefton (Univ. of Toronto , Canada)
Vascularized Organoid Engineered by Modular Assembly Enables Blood Perfusion
Gabor Forgacs (Univ. of Missouri)
Cell Aggregates as Self-assembling Bioink
Vladimir Mironov (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Fabrication of Tubular Tissue Constructs by Centrifugal Casting of Cells Suspended in an In Situ Crosslinkable Hyaluronan-gelatin Hydrogel

EDUCATION AND TEACHING TRACK

EDUCATION WORKSHOP: USE OF TABLET COMPUTERS IN TEACHING THE ANATOMICAL SCIENCES
Saturday, April 1, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Chairs: Suzanne Stensaas (Univ. of Utah) and Douglas Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Supported by Hewlett Packard
The "journaling" capabilities of Tablet PCs make chalk, whiteboards, and even overhead projectors obsolete. Workshop leaders will demonstrate the various ways a Tablet PC can make your teaching more interactive and dynamic, no matter what the subject. Course masters in histology, gross anatomy, and neuroanatomy, who are experienced teachers and tablet users, will share innovative new ways to interact with students during class or discussion groups. Even virtual microscopy slides can be shared and annotated. Speakers will
demonstrate specific examples of the utility of this evolving technology and discuss its value to both educators and students. Using onsite demo models from Hewlett Packard, participants will receive hands-on training. A PC user with two hours of practice can easily manage the basic skills.

Suzanne S. Stensaas (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Teaching Neuroscience with a Tablet PC
Douglas F. Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Teaching Histology with a Tablet PC
K. Bo Foreman (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Teaching Gross Anatomy with a Tablet PC

EDUCATION MASTER CLASS IN ANATOMY: THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM
Saturday, April 1, 12:30 - 3:00 PM
Chair: Britt Sanford (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine)
The human nervous system is customarily divided into four major divisions – the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the somatic nervous system, and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS, as well as the somatic nervous system, has both peripheral and central components and is related largely, although not exclusively, to unconscious, automatic functions. This Master Class will address the central and peripheral components, pathways, and major functions of the human autonomic nervous system.

Britt Sanford (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine)
Craniosacral Outflow: The Four Cranial Parasympathetic Ganglia & Attendant Pathways
Bob Fisk (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine)
Craniosacral Outflow: Cranial Nerve X and the Pelvic Splanchnic Nerves of the Parasympathetic Division of the ANS
James Nemitz (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine)
Thoracolumbar Outflow: Sympathetic Ganglia & Attendant Pathways
John Nolte (Univ. of Arizona)
Hypothalamus: Central Regulator of the Autonomic Nervous System

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING AS A TEACHING TOOL
Sunday, April 2, 8:00 - 10:00 AM

Chairs: Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah) and Richard Wiggins (Univ. of Utah)
This symposium will review the important aspects of incorporating diagnostic imaging into modern education. Topics include: the history of education in radiology and the integration of digital imaging into the academic environment; the incorporation of post-processing techniques into education; the addition of imaging into mobile platform teaching uses; and the integration of diagnostic imaging in gross anatomy education.

Richard H. Wiggins (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Digital Radiology Teaching & Education
Adam E. Flanders (Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital)
Mobile Education in Medical Imaging
C. Douglas Philips (Univ. of Virginia Health System)
CNS Anatomy & Radiology via 3D Methodology
David Morton (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Radiographic Interactive Teaching Tool for First-Year Medical Students Taking Gross Anatomy

WORKSHOP: PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE - TRAINING & CERTIFICATION OF ANATOMICAL SCIENCE EDUCATORS
Sunday, April 2, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Chairs: Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ.) and Richard Drake (The Cleveland Clinic)
Training programs for anatomical educators are an endangered species. Workshop leaders will address questions such as: Does this create an opportunity for the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), given its tradition of fostering educational research? Should AAA develop guidelines and certify programs that train individuals who want to teach the anatomical sciences? Would certification make such programs attractive to prospective students and parent institutions alike? What should a certification program look like to best achieve these goals? Participants in this workshop will discuss and develop recommendations for AAA's Educational Affairs Committee to pursue.

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Monday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 122/125
Supported by Elsevier

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES: WHO OWNS WHAT?
Monday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Chair: Douglas Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
This symposium will provide an introduction to publishing educational materials online. Topics covered include a basic explanation of online copyright issues; the HEAL website, a national online medical teaching resource, as a publishing platform; an open-access publication of scholarly work; and experiences in establishing and running an electronic journal, Medical Education Online.

Simon J. Frankel (Howard Rice Nemerovski Canady Falk & Rabkin)
Basic Copyright Issues for Online Publishing
Sebastian Uijtdehaage (Univ. of California , Los Angeles)
Opportunities for Publishing Health Educational Materials Online
John Willinsky (Univ. of British Columbia)
The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research
David J. Solomon (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )
Publishing an Open Access Online Journal: Medical Education Online

REFRESHER COURSE: THE MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM
Tuesday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM
Co-sponsored by The American College of Sports Medicine
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) and Linda Walters (Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Pathology affecting the musculoskeletal system due to injury or disease is seen at all ages, and those affected by these conditions can comprise over a quarter of the patients in a general medical practice. Nonetheless, studies suggest that graduates of health professional schools may be insufficiently prepared to handle the musculoskeletal conditions that they will face in practice. Focusing primarily on the skeletal muscles and skeletal components of the limbs and the trunk, speakers will cover the following topics: an overview on how muscles work; the elements of and the anatomical basis for clinical physical examination to assess health of the musculoskeletal system; selected case studies that may be useful in teaching the musculoskeletal system; and survey results used to discover practical and innovative ways of teaching the musculoskeletal system will be discussed in the final presentation. Examples of several interesting teaching methods will be highlighted.

Kimberly Topp (Univ. of California , San Francisco)
How Do Muscles Function
Mark Niedfeldt (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Refresher Course: The Musculoskeletal System Musculoskeletal Assessment
Christina Allen (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Practical Application of Anatomy to Case Studies of the Musculoskeletal System
David Bolender ( Medical College of Wisconsin )
Adaptations in Teaching the Musculoskeletal System

ROLE OF ANATOMY IN TEACHING PROFESSIONALISM
Tuesday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM
Chairs: Wojciech Pawlina (Mayo Clinic) & Lawrence Rizzolo ( Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Patient advocates, medical educators, and physicians are voicing concerns about the erosion of professionalism in the medical community. Today's medicine is a field of collaboration. In anatomy, medical students experience teamwork, develop communication and leadership skills, work in an emotionally charged setting, and recognize their own limitations. This session will explore the historical relationship of Gross Anatomy courses to changing concepts of professionalism and discuss several approaches to integrate the vital concepts of professionalism with anatomy instruction.

John Harley Warner (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Anatomical Dissection & the Professional Formation of American Doctors: Historical Perspectives
Louis N. Pangaro (Uniformed Services Univ. )
The Role of Anatomy in Teaching Professionalism: Frameworks for Students' Progress
Wojciech Pawlina (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)
Can Professionalism be Introduced in the Gross Anatomy Course?
Lawrence J. Rizzolo ( Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Learning Societies that Integrate the Goals of Professionalism & Anatomy

SYMPOSIA

PERICYTE-ENDOTHELIAL INTERACTION IN ANGIOGENESIS
Sunday, April 2, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Chair: Mark Majesky (Univ. of North Carolina)
Signals exchanged between endothelial cells and mural cells control the formation, remodeling, and function of blood vessels. Pericytes are microvascular mural cells with stem cell-like properties that play dynamic roles in vascular development and angiogenesis. This symposium will discuss phylogenetic origins of blood vessels in primitive vertebrates, sphingolipid signaling, and pericyte recruitment in higher vertebrates, abnormalities of endothelial-pericyte interactions in tumor vascular beds, and molecular pathways for differentiation of pericytes and mural cells in vivo

Bill Aird (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center , Harvard Medical School)
Phylogenetic Origins of Endothelium
Timothy Hla (Univ. of Connecticut)
Sphingosine-1-phosphate & S1P Receptors in Angiogenesis
Donald McDonald (Univ. of California , San Francisco)
Abnormalities of Pericytes on Tumor Blood Vessels
Mark Majesky (Univ. of North Carolina)
Molecular Pathways for Pericyte and Mural Cell Ddifferentiation

ALCOHOL, STRESS & ANXIETY: REGULATION BY NEUROPEPTIDESZ
Sunday, April 2, 2:30 - 4:30 PM
Chairs: Bang Hwang (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine) & Markus Heilig (NIH/NIAAA)
Central administration of NPY suppresses alcohol intake. This effect is probably via the NPY system at the extended amygdaline. However, CRF and NPY in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala appear to be more associated with anxiety. Speakers will focus on the results of studies that support the hypothesis that dysregulation of central NPY and CRF systems contributes to anxiety and alcohol drinking.

Cindy Ehlers (The Scripps Research Institute)
Effects of NPY and CRF on Ethanol Intake & Anxiety
Robert B. Stewart (Purdue Univ. , Indianapolis)
Neuropeptide Y Behavioral Effects in Alcohol-preferring Rats
Markus Heilig (NIH/NIAAA)
Neuropeptide in Anxiety and Alcoholism
Donald R. Gehlert (Lilly Research Laboratories)
Regulation of Anxiety-like Behavior by Neuropeptide Y and Corticotropin Releasing Factor

PRIMARY CILIA
Monday, April 3, 8:00 - 10:00 AM
Chair: Peter Satir (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
Primary cilia are cellular antennae found on kidney tubule and bile duct epithelia, chondrocytes, fibroblasts, neurons and glia. Primary cilia are generally non-motile, built around a 9+0 axoneme, surrounded by a ciliary membrane containing specialized receptors and channels that provide a signaling mechanism controlling cell growth and differentiation. Defective signaling leads to a reversal of left-right body symmetry, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and polycystic liver disease. This symposium will provide an overview of current developments.

Peter Satir (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
Introduction to Primary Cilia
Gregory Pazour (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
Proteomics of Motile & Primary Cilia: Clues to Human Disease
Nicholas F. La Russo (Mayo Medical School)
Pathophysiology of Cholangiocyte Cilia
Martina Brueckner (Yale Univ. Medical School)
Cilia and Gap Junctions in Left-Right Development
Soren T. Christensen (August Krogh Institute, Copenhagen)
The Primary Cilium is a Sensory Organelle that Regulates Growth Control and Tissue Homeostasis

CELL MIGRATION DURING ZEBRAFISH DEVELOPMENT
Monday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record & Olympus America Inc.
Chairs: Richard Dorsky (Univ. of Utah) & Tatjana Piotrowski (Univ. of Utah)
Organs such as the heart, skeletal muscle, and the peripheral nervous system perform vital functions that are highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom. As these complex organs develop, the differentiation of multiple cell types must be coordinated for the proper morphology and function to be realized in the mature animal. This symposium will discuss the role of cell migration in organ development, using the zebrafish embryo as a model system.

Sharon Amacher (Univ. of California , Berkeley)
Cell Morphogenesis & Migration During Zebrafish Somitogenesis
Deborah Yelon (Skirball Institute)
Endocardium Directs Cardiomyocyte Movement During Heart Tube Assembly
Tatjana Piotrowski (Univ. of Utah)
Cell Migration and Neurogenesis in the Zebrafish Lateral Line
Iain Shepherd (Emory Univ.)
Mesendodermal Neural Crest Interactions During Enteric Nervous System Precursor Migration

$6 BILLION MAN
Monday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM
Chairs: Daniel Neufeld (Univ. of South Dakota School of Medicine) and Nicole Grosland (Univ. of Iowa)
The $6 Million Man premiered in 1974. The premise ... a man suffers a debilitating accident thereby prompting scientists to "rebuild" him by equipping him via "bionics." He was given superhuman upper body strength thanks to his bionic arm, incredible speed with his bionic legs, and eagle-like vision with a bionic eye. This symposium is an effort to fast-forward 30 years to determine how much fiction in 1974 is at least partial reality in 2005.

Tim Marler (Univ. of Iowa)
Santos: A New Kind of Virtual Human
Daniel Palanker (Stanford Univ.)
Development of a High Resolution Optoelectronic Retinal Prosthesis
William Craelius (Rutgers Univ.)
Reaching Toward a Bionic Arm
H. Kazerooni (Univ. of California , Berkeley)
Berkeley Human Exoskeleton Technology
Scott L. Delp (Stanford Univ.)
Digital Humans: From Biomechanical Models to Simulated Surgery

CARDIAC/MESENCHYME/FIBROBLASTS - DYNAMIC INTERACTION WITH MYOCARDIAL CELLS
Monday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM
Henry Gray Award Symposium
Chair: Roger Markwald (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
While the cardiac myocytes make up the bulk of the myocardial volume, the cardiac fibroblasts are the most numerous cell type. This symposium will focus on the crosstalk or interaction between these two cell types. Recent investigations have shown that fibroblasts are "sentinel cells" that express cadherins, connexins, and cytokines that allow these cells to function as mechanosensors of the environment, including mechanical, electrical, and chemical signals. Their response to such signaling will be discussed in this session, including changes in their interactions between themselves, myocytes, and the surrounding ECM during injury induced, ventricular remodeling, as well as during embryonic remodeling of the heart.The controversy of where cardiac fibroblasts originate in the embryonic and adult heart, particularly after injury, will also be addressed. Data will be presented based on a single cell engraftment model indicating that fibroblasts in the adult heart arise from a circulating progenitor cell and that their numbers can be affected by environmental cues.

Roger Markwald (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Myocardial Remodeling in Embryonic Heart: An Inductive Interaction Mediated by Periostin
Thomas Borg (Univ. of South Carolina)
Interaction of Fibroblasts and Myocytes in Postnatal Remodeling
Rick Visconti (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Postnatal Origins of Cardiac Interstitial & Valvular Fibroblasts
Wayne Giles (Univ. of California-San Diego)
K+ Currents Regulate Function in Ventricular Fibroblasts and Myofibroblasts
Peter Kohl (Univ. of Oxford)
Fibroblast-Myocyte Interrelation in the Mammalian Heart: Experiments and Models

MAMMALS IN MOTION: STUDIES IN FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY
Monday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM
Co-sponsored by the Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chair: Rebecca Fisher (Midwestern Univ.)
Physical anthropologists, mammalogists, and paleontologists are trained in the anatomical sciences, and many are employed in medical school departments. This session is targeted toward future educators in the anatomical sciences, who may come from a variety of disciplines. Investigators will highlight their research using a variety of methods to examine the relationship between form and function in marine mammals and primates and review the affects of body size, ontogeny, mode of locomotion, and diet, and the evolution of mammalian forms.

Carl Terranova (CUNY Medical School)
Evolutionary, Developmental, and Functional Aspects of Grasping Hands
Jason Organ (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine)
Hanging Around: The Functional Anatomy of Primate Tails
Joy Reidenberg (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
Motor Mouth Moby: Is the Hyoid Also a Locomotor Bone in Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises?
Jonathan Perry (Duke Univ. Medical Center)
Anatomy & Scaling of Prosimian Chewing Muscles

CONTRROVERSIES IN DEFINING VASCULAR STEM & REGENITOR CELLS
Tuesday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM
Chair: Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
As interest in adult stem/progenitor cells has increased, so has the problem of identifying them. With respect to the endothelium, at least 10 different cell populations from bone marrow and other tissues have been identified as endothelial cell progenitors. This session will outline current disparate criteria used to define endothelial cell progenitors and their progeny, and attempt to develop consensus definitions that might be applied to bring more uniformity and clarity to the field.

Darwin Prockop (Tulane Univ. Health Sciences Center)
Reparative Power of Multipotent Stromal Cells from Bone Marrow
Noel Caplice (Univ. of College Cork)
Vascular Progenitor Cells – Lineage Controversies
Mervin C. Yoder , Jr. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Defining Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Karen K. Hirschi (Baylor College of Medicine)
Origin and Fate of Vascular Progenitors

NEW FUNCTIONS OF SPECTRIN & THE MEMBRANE SKELETON
Tuesday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Co-sponsored by the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology Chairpersons
Chair: Steven Goodman (Univ. of Texas, Dallas)
Spectrin was first isolated from RBCs in the 1960s and its role as a major structural component of the RBC membrane skeleton was well defined by 1980. In 1981, Goodman and colleagues (PNAS 78:7570-7574, 2001) demonstrated that spectrin was a ubiquitious protein in nonerythroid cells. Twenty-five years later, the speakers will discuss spectrin's role in neurotransmission, DNA repair, the role of a spectrin binding partner in Ca release from internal stores, and recent studies demonstrating that spectrin has a previously unknown function as a chimeric E2/E3 ubiquitin conjugating/ligating enzyme.

Warren Zimmer (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
Spectrin's Key Role in Synaptic Transmission
Muriel Lambert (UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School)
Spectrin: Its Role in DNA Repair
Troy Stevens (Univ. of South Alabama College of Medicine)
Control of Store Operated Calcium Entry by the Spectrin Membrane Skeleton
Steven Goodman (Univ. of Texas , Dallas)
Spectrin is a Chimeric E2/E3 Ubiquitin Ligase

TISSUE INTERACTION & SIGNALIN IN LIMB FORMATION & DEVELOPMENT
Tuesday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 120
Chair: Qian Chen (Rhode Island Hospital)

The field of limb morphogenesis and development has progressed rapidly in recent years. Interactions and signaling among different tissues in the limb have been shown to be instrumental in the developmental process. Molecular basis of the interaction and signaling has been established. A series of morphogens and growth factors have been identified to play important roles in limb formation and bone development. They include Hedgehog, BMP, FGF, and Wnt. These signaling pathways crosstalk to form an intricate and exquisite regulatory network. Furthermore, intracellular kinases have been implicated in transducing the signals from the environment to affect gene expression. This symposium will discuss molecular regulation of different aspects of the limb development process, from the early events of limb morphogenesis— including the control of digit number and identity— to the effect of perichondrium and periosteum on bone formation and recent breakthroughs on TGF-ß and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in cartilage and bone development. They will serve as paradigms for studying diseases that recapitulate these signaling events during development.

John F. Fallon (Univ. of Wisconsin , Madison)
How to Make a Digit: Patterning the Autopod
Thomas Linsenmayer (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine)
Tissue Interactions in the Growth Regulation of Developing Long Bones
Qian Chen (Brown Medical School)
The MAP Kinase Signaling Pathway Regulating Bone Formation
Xu Cao (Univ. of Alabama School of Medicine)
Novel Mechanisms of TGFbeta/BMP Signaling in Bone Development

ANATOMICAL APPROACHES IN THE STUDY OF COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS
Tuesday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 121
Chair: Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Understanding complex biomedical problems requires integrative studies that span length scales from the molecular level to the anatomical level of resolution. This symposium will describe exciting state-of-the-art studies that combine physical and computational data with functional analysis of biological mechanisms. The speakers in this session are leaders who have reached beyond their conventional disciplines to form creative research teams combining biologists, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists.

Cecilia Lo (NIH/NHLBI)
High Throughput Anatomic Screening for Structural Heart Defects in Chemically Mutagenized Mice
Igor R. Efimov (Washington Univ., St. Louis)
Structure/Function of the Supraventricuilar Pacemaking & Conduction System of the Rabbit Heart
Robert Mecham (Washington Univ.)
Material Properties of Vessel Wall in Mutant Mice
Robert T. Tranquillo (Univ. of Minnesota)
In Vitro Tissue Growth & Development in Fibrin Gel Remodeled by Neonatal Smooth Muscle Cells

DEVELOPMENTAL MECHANISMS IN THE MOUSE
Tuesday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 120
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Philippe Soriano (Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center)
Basic signaling processes that play pivotal roles in embryonic development are often also implicated in human disease. Investigations in the mouse, which has become the premier system for specific genetic alterations due to the availability of embryonic stem cells, can thus provide valuable insight. This session will be devoted to recent advances in mouse molecular genetics. Topics to be discussed include: the development of the nervous system; the neural crest; and the reproductive system.

Richard Behringer (M.D. Anderson Cancer Center)
Genetic Regulation of Mammalian Sexual Development
Marianne Bronner-Fraser (California Institute of Technology)
Regulatory Events in Neural Crest Formation and Migration
Susan McConnell (Stanford Univ.)
Assembling a Neural Circuit: Cell Fate Determination During Brain Development
Philippe Soriano (Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center)
Growth Factor Signaling Specificity in Mouse Development

SORTING OUT SIGNALS THAT INFLUENCE SKELETAL MUSCLE DETERMINATION & DIFFERENTIATION
Wednesday, April 5, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 120
Chair: Judith Venuti (LSU Health Science Center)
Myogenesis, the formation of skeletal muscle, is among the best understood developmental processes. Regulation of myogenic precursor cell proliferation and differentiation is through the interplay of a variety of external factors. This symposium will explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which these factors influence myogenic progenitor specification during development and myogenic stem cells activation during injury and repair. The identification of these factors and the knowledge we have gained about their modes of action during muscle development is leading to new avenues in the design of therapies for the treatment of muscular diseases.

Ian Brauner (LSU Health Sciences Center)
Mapping Wnt Signaling in the Developing Somite
Charles Ordahl (Univ. of California , San Francisco)
Asymmetry in Myogenesis
Phillipa Francis-West (King's College London)
Wnt Regulation of Embryonic Limb and Craniofacial Muscle Differentiation
Michael Rudnicki (Ottawa Health Research Institute)
Molecular Regulation of Regenerative Myogenisis

FETAL ORIGINS OF ADULT DISEASE
Wednesday, April 5, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 123
Chair: Dale Abrahamson (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
This symposium takes a different approach to the usual theme associated with this title: Inadequate maternal nutrition leads to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in offspring. Speakers will cover topics that include: kidney development mechanisms of nephron endowment; the mutations exerted during organogenesis manifest later in disease; the development and maintenance of pancreatic beta cells, and errors in neurogenesis that contribute to sensory deficits.

Julie R. Ingelfinger (Harvard Medical School ; Mass. General Hospital)
Mechanisms of Renal 'Programming' and Cardiorenal Endowment
Clifford E. Kashtan (Univ. of Minnesota Medical School)
Adult Kidney Disease Due to Genetic Errors in Renal Morphogenesis
Maureen Gannon (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
Factors Regulating the Genesis and Maintenance of Pancreatic Beta Cell Mass
Douglas Wright (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Shaping of Neural Sensory Systems During Development

PLATFORMS SESSIONS
AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.

VASCULOGENESIS/ANGIOGENESIS/ARTERIOGENESIS (7010-AAA)
Sunday, April 2, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 120
Chair: Mary Walker (Univ. of New Mexico)
Supported by March of Dimes

M. Ushio-Fukai (Emory Univ.)
N. Sheibani (Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School)
K. M. Hodivala-Dilke (Cancer Reserach, United Kingdom)
V. L. Bautch (The Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
W. Zheng (Univ. of Iowa)
L. A. Compton (Vanderbilt Univ.)
T. L. Nesbitt (Univ. of South Carolina)
A. B. Hoffman (Univ. of California, San Francisco)

BONE & CARTILAGE
Sunday, April 2, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 123
Supported by The Alliance for Better Bone Health
Chair: David Burr (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine) and Alex Robling (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)

T. Bellido (Univ. of Arkansas)
R. K. Long (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
A. G. Robling (Indiana Univ.)
J. Li (Indiana Univ.)
V. L. Scheinfeld (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
W. C. Peterson (Wright State Univ.)
L. Wang (Univ. of Delaware)
C. Farnum (Cornell Univ.)

TEACHING ANATOMY TO NON-MEDICAL STUDENTS
Sunday, April 2, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 122/125
Chair: Robert Spears (Baylor College of Dentistry)

J. K. Brueckner (Univ. of Kentucky)
W.D. Davenport (Univ. of Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine)
K. B. Foreman (Univ. of Utah)
R.E. Druzinsky (Governors State Univ.)
L. R. Sherman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
V.D. O'Loughlin (Indiana Univ.)
S. K. Sommers Smith (Boston Univ.)
A. C. Potterfield (Westminister College)

ANALYSIS OF ENDOTHELIAL CELL DYNAMICS
Monday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 120
Chair: Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)

J.M. James (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
B. P. Hierck (Leiden Univ.)
E. D. Perryn (Univ. of Kansas)
C. Hughes (Univ. California)
Z. Weihau (Univ. of Texas)
V. D. Djonov (Institute of Anatomy, Bern)
E. I. Dedkov (Univ. of Iowa)

REPLACEMENT TISSUES & REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Monday, April 3, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 121
Chair: Jay Potts (Univ. of South Carolina)

G. Christ (Wake Forest Univ.)
S. C. Tseng (TissueTech, Inc.)
M. Sieber-Blum (Medical College of Wisconsin)
L. Terracio (New York Univ.)
R. L. Goodwin (Univ. of South Carolina)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS: USING TECHNOLOGY
Monday, April 3, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 122/125
Chairs: Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina) and William Ovalle (Univ. of British Columbia)

L.E. Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)
R.B. Trelease (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)
S. R. Takekawa (Univ. of Hawaii)
D. Saddawi-Konefka (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
R.S. Crissman (Medical Univ. of Ohio)
T.R. Barco (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
G. L. Todd (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center)
J. E. Johnson (Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine)

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
Tuesday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 120
Chair: Ann Ramsdell (University of South Carolina School of Medicine)

A. Ramsdell (University of South Carolina School of Medicine)
C. Cui (Univ. of Kansas)
M. H. Connolly (Dalhousie Univ.)
Q. Wang (Baylor College of Dentistry)
T. Frank-Cannon (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)
C. M. Freisinger (Univ. of Iowa)
K. Ahlbrecht (University of Giessen, Germany)
J. Rawlins (Baylor College of Dentistry)

WOUND HEALING AND REGENERATION
Tuesday, April 4, 8:00 - 10:00 AM, Room 123
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)

L. A. DiPietro (Loyola Univ.)
E. Badiavas (Boston Univ.)
F. Berthod (Univ. Laval, Québec)
Y. Cheng (Rutgers Univ.)
A. M. Ferreira (Loyola Univ.)
K. K. Svoboda (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
M. X. Zhang (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
A. Ghaly (Dalhousie Univ.)

DIVERSE STEL CELL NICHES
Tuesday. April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 121
Chairs: Joseph LaManna and Nicole Ward (Case Western Reserve Univ.)

Y. F. Hu (Medical College of Wisconsin)
W. M. Schopperle (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
S. L. Snabes (Aastrom Biosciences)
N.N. Gangopadhyay (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
J. G. Sharp (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center)
K. A. Menkhi (univ. of Sains Malaysia)
P. Dore-Duffy (Wayne State Univ.)
W. Mackiln (Cleveland Clinic Foundation)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS: IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM
Tuesday, April 4, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Room 122/125
Chairs: Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina) and William Ovalle (Univ. of British Columbia)

W. Hartwig (Touro Univ.)
S. Farber (SUNY Downstate College of Medicine)
T.R. Olson (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
C. S. Kuehn (Western Univ. of Health Sciences)
S. Metten (UCLA David Geffen Medical School)
S. Pieczenik (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
T. R. Milanese (Mayo Clinic)
N. A. Granger (Univ. of North Carolina)

REGULATORY MECHANISMS FOR CARDIAC CELL DIFFERENTIATION
Tuesday, April 4, 2:30 - 4:30 PM, Room 123
Chair: Larry Lemanski (Florida Atlantic Univ.)

K. A. Webster (Univ. of Miami)
C. Zhang (Florida Atlantic Univ.)
M. Kim (Medical College of Wisconsin)
P. Anversa (New York Medical College)
H. Deng (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
J. Lincoln (Cincinnati Children's Hospital)
V. V. Fedorov (Washington Univ.)
W. J. Hucker (Washington Univ.)

BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF AGING
Wednesday, April 5, 8:00 - 10:00 AM
Chair: Suzzette Chopin (Texas A&M Univ. - Corpus Christi)

L. Hayflick (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
P. S. Timiras (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
V. P. Fazan (School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil)
W. Zhao (Wake Forest Univ.)
M. Taylor (Wake Forest Univ.)
Y. Aydar (Eskisehir Osmangazi Univ., Turkey)
N. Kaul (Hill Top Research Inc.)


ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AS A 21st CENTURY TOOL
Wednesday, April 5, 10:30 - 12:30
Chair: Vincent Gattone (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Supported by the Microscopy Society of America and the Indiana Microscopy Society

K. McDonald (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
K. Moore (Univ. of Iowa)
E. M. Myers (Univ. of Nebraska)
N. M. Afifi (Qatar Univ.)
L. Joubert (BioPAD)

POSTER TOPICS
AAA Poster Sessions are organized based on submitted abstracts. Authors are required to be at their posters from 12:30 – 2:00 PM on the day they are scheduled.

SUNDAY, APRIL 2
BONE, CARTILAGE, & CONNECTIVE TISSUE
CARDIAC BIOLOGY
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
MUSCLE CELL BIOLOGY
VASCULAR BIOLOGY

MONDAY, APRIL 3
ANATOMICAL FORM & FUNCTION
ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS
ANIMAL MODELS OF DISEASE
IMAGING & MICROSCOPY
TEACHING INNOVATIONS

TUESDAY, APRIL 4
CELL DYNAMICS
MORPHOGENESIS

NEUROBIOLOGY
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
STEM CELL BIOLOGY
TEACHING INNOVATIONS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5
LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACTS

American Association of Anatomists

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