2007 Annual Meeting - Washington

April 28-May 2, 2007 - Washington, DC

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Darwin Prockop, M.D., Ph.D. (Tulane Univ.)
Director of Gene Therapy Center, Professor of Biochemistry
Sunday, April 29

The Reparative Power of Multipotent Stromal Cells from Bone Marrow
Recent publications have demonstrated that most tissues contain stem-like progenitor cells that play a key role in the repair of tissue injury. When the endogenous stem/progenitor cells in a tissue are exhausted, they are supplemented by similar stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow. A major focus has been on the stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow referred to as mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs and similar cells from other tissues have been shown to repair tissues by differentiating so as to replace injured cells, by producing chemokines, and in part by cell fusion. However, there has been no obvious explanation for repeated observations that MSCs enhance repair of tissues in experimental models in which their level of engraftment is extremely low. We have recently found that MSCs can repair injured cells and tissues by two additional mechanisms: Stimulation of the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells that are endogenous to a tissue and by transfer of mitochondria or mitochondrial DNA to cells with nonfunctional mitochondria. Human MSCs infused into the hippocampus of immunodeficient mice stimulated proliferation of and neurogenesis by endogenous neural stem cells (Munoz et al.PNAS, 2005). Co-culture of human MSCs with a line of pulmonary epithelial cells with non-functional mitochondria generated clones of the epithelial cells with functional mitochondria as a result of active transfer of either mitochondria or mitochondrial DNA from the MSCs (Spees, Olson, et al., PNAS, 2006). More recently we observed (Lee et al., PNAS in press) that intravenously infused human MSCs lowered the blood sugar, increased mouse insulin and decreased morphological changes in the renal glomeruli of streptozocin-treated diabetic mice (NOD/SCID). The human MSCs engrafted into the pancreas and increased both the number of islets and the immunoreactive mouse insulin per islet. The human MSCs also engrafted into the kidney, but it was not apparent whether the decrease in renal pathology was explained by direct action of the cells or by the decrease in blood sugar. Therefore, there are now multiple strategies for developing new therapies for a broad range of diseases by enhancing one or more of the multiple mechanisms whereby MSCs normally repair tissues. Supported in part by grants from NIH grants AR48323, HL 073755, HL075161, and HL073252; HCA the Healthcare Company, and the Louisiana Gene Therapy Research Consortium.

Supported by  JEOL USA, Inc. through the AACBNC

PLENARY SESSION: CELL MICROENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT & CANCER
Henry Gray Award Symposium
Chair: Mary Hendrix (Northwestern Univ.)

Plenary Lecture
Mary Hendrix (Northwestern Univ.)
The Convergence of Embryonic & Cancer Signaling Pathways: Role in Tumor Cell Plasticity
Sunday, April 29

Aggressive tumor cells share many characteristics in common with embryonic progenitors. During vertebrate development, multipotent precursor cells are specified to particular fates through the autocrine or paracrine delivery of signaling molecules. Similarly, during cancer progression, malignant cells release and receive cues that promote tumor growth and metastasis. During development and cancer progression, the microenvironment is critical in cell fate determination. This symposium will focus on the convergence of embryonic and cancer signaling pathways; the molecular cross-talk between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment; the computational analysis of cell motility during early vertebrate morphogenesis; environmentally-induced changes in adult stem cell function; and the spatial-mechanical regulation of cell fate by extracellular matrix.

Plenary Symposium
Sunday, April 29


Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
Environmentally-induced Changes in Adult Stem Cell Function
Valerie Weaver (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Force, Dimensionality and Tissue Morphogenesis and Malignancy
Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas)
Local Microenvironments vs. Tissue Compartments in Embryos - Which Cells Are "Really" Moving and Where Are They Going?
Theresa Guise (Univ. of Virginia)
Solid Tumor Metastases to Bone: Role of the Bone Microenvironment

SPECIAL HYBRID SYMPOSIA: ENDOTHELIAL CELL BEHAVIOR
Chair: Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Sunday, April 29

Kelley Argraves
(Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Sphingolipid Signaling in the Regulation of Vascular Network Assembly
Andras Czirok (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
VE-cadherin and avb3 Integrin-mediated Collective Cell Migration and Patterning during Vasculogenesis
Chris Hughes (Univ. of California, Irvine)
Endothelial Cell-stromal Interactions During Angiogenesis
Melody Swartz (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)
Lymphatic Endothelial Cell Behavior: Emerging Roles in Transport, Metabolism, and Lymphocyte Trafficking
Ming-Wei Chao (Rutgers University)
Treatment of Endothelial Cells In Vitro with Varying Concentrations of Diesel Particles and Carbon Black


R.R. BENSLEY AWARD LECTURE IN CELL BIOLOGY
Matthew D. Welch (University of California, Berkeley)
Sunday, April 29, 5:00-6:00 PM
Lessons from the Enemy: What Pathogens Have Taught Us about the Control of Cytoskeletal Dynamics

C.J. HERRICK AWARD LECTURE IN NEUROANATOMY
Catherine S. Woolley (Northwestern University)
Monday, April 30, 5:00-6:00 PM
Estrogen and Synapses in the Hippocampus

H.W. MOSSMAN AWARD LECTURE IN DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
Liqun Luo (Stanford University)
Tuesday, May 1, 5:00-6:00 PM
Exploring Neural Circuit Organization and Assembly Using Genetic Mosaics

STUDENT/POSTDOC AWARD PLATFORM SESSIONS

LANGMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATION
Saturday, April 28, 3:30-5:00 PM
Chair: Rebecca Pratt (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine)

Rui Duan (Indiana Univ.)
Non-muscle Myosin IIA is Required for Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Fusion
Michelle Sukup (Univ. of Iowa)
Using CD34+ Cells to Stimulate Vascularization and Inhibit Encapsulation of Implantable Bioartificial Devices
Wei-Wen Hu (Univ. of Michigan)
In situ Transduction by Virus Localization on Bioengineering Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration
Ming-Wei Chao (Rutgers University)
Treatmemt of Endothelial Cells In Vitro with Varying Concentrations of Diesel Particles and Carbon Black
Eric Gee (York Univ.)
VEGFR2 Regulates p38 but not ERK1/2 in Response to Shear Stress
Zongyang Sun (University of Washington)
Masticatory Micromovement in Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis and its Effect on Bone Growth


PRESLEY-ZEISS POSTDOC AWARD PRESENTATION
Saturday, April 28, 5:30-7:00 PM
Chair:
Baljit Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)

Ondrej Nanka (Charles Univ. in Prague)
Abnormal Coronary Tree Development in Embryonic Hypoxia Leads to Heart Failure and Embryonic Lethality
Cheng Cui (Univ. of Kansas)
Positional Fate Map Reveals a Unified Heart Forming Region
Ben Fogelgren (Univ. of Hawaii)
Deficient Embryonic Expression of SIX2 is Associated with Decreased Glomerular Number and Chronic Renal Failure in the Adult 3H1 Br/+ Mouse
Ke Yang (Case Western Reserve University)
Expression Analysis of CITED2 mRNA During Chicken Heart Development
Anita Austin (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Immortalized Mouse Epicardial Cells Undergo Differention in Response to Transforming Growth Factor-&[beta]
Julian Guttman (Univ. of British Columbia)
Functional Gap Junction Hemichannels are Generated In Vivo During Infectious Enteric Disease

IMAGING WORKSHOPS

Saturday, April 28

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMAGING EMBRYONIC CARDIOVASCULAR STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
Chairs: Florence Rothenberg (Univ. of Cincinnati) & Jennifer Lucitti (Baylor College of Medicine)
12:30-3:00 PM

Investigations of the embryonic cardiovascular system are inherently challenging because it is constantly moving and microscopic in scope. The pursuit of structural and functional questions in such dynamic systems requires imaging technologies with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. Novel technologic advances make it possible to non-invasively measure hemodynamic parameters, perform three- and four-dimensional imaging, and localize molecular activity in real-time. This symposium highlights new developments in the use of various imaging modalities and molecular detection.

Colin Phoon (New York Univ.)
Ultrasound Phenotyping of Embryonic Cardiovascular Development
Mary Dickinson (Baylor College of Medicine)
4D, High-speed Confocal Imaging Reveals Functional Changes During Cardiac Development in Vertebrate Embryos
Guy Salama (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Calcium Waves in Embryonic Hearts
Andrew Rollins (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Optical Coherence Tomography: A Tool for Embryonic Cardiography

IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENT: FOCUSING ON CELL MIGRATION & SHAPE CHANGE
Sponsored by Carl Zeiss Microimaging
Chair: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
3:30-6:00 PM

Advances in imaging technology are offering unique subcellular insights that now permit us to address how local events translate into formation of pattern in intact embryos. The speakers will present clever light microscopy techniques adapted to events in zebrafish, xenopus, mouse and chick. Featured topics will include: studies of neuronal migration during development, assembly of the lateral line by coordination of collective groups of cells, how individual cell shape changes are regulated to produce neural tube closure, and how interactions between the local microenvironment and other cells sculpt neural crest migration.

Mary Beth Hatten (Rockefeller Univ.)
In Vivo Imaging of Neuronal Migration
Darren Gilmour (European Molecular Biology Laboratory)
Pushing and Pulling Migrating Tissues In Vivo with GPCRs
John Wallingford (Univ. of Texas, Austin)
Novel Modification to the Mechanism of Cell Division in Neural Epithelial Cells During Vertebrate Neural Tube Closure
Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Using Advanced Imaging Techniques to Study In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Events of Neural Crest Cell Migration

VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT, GROWTH & ADAPTATIONS MINI-MEETING
Co-sponsored by The North American Vascular Biology Organization
Chair: Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
This two-day meeting will focus on recent discoveries related to the numerous events that comprise the formation of a blood vessel, its growth and the adaptations necessary for remodeling.  Topics will include stem and progenitor cells, molecules that regulate vascular assembly and growth, cell signaling and the extracellular matrix.

Monday, April 30

VASCULAR ADAPTATIONS
Chair: Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
8:00-10:00 AM

Blood vessel growth is required to provide adequate tissue perfusion in a number of physiological and pathological conditions. This symposium addresses four key topics of vascular adaptations that facilitate improved perfusion: formation of collateral vessels; flow-mediated remolding; and angiogenesis and arteriogenesis that occur under physiological (exercise training) and pathological (post myocardial infarction) conditions.

Ronald Terjung (Univ. of Missouri)
Exercise Induced Angiogenesis & Arteriogenesis
William Sessa (Yale Univ.)
Flow-Mediated Vascular Remodeling
William Chillian (LSU Health Science Center)
Mechanisms Underlying Coronary Collateral Growth
Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
Post-Infarction Angiogenesis & Arteriogenesis

VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT
Chairs: Takashi Mikawa (Univ. of California, San Francisco) & Victoria Ballard (Cornell Univ.)
10:30-12:30 PM

Vascular development is a complex process involving the coordinated regulation of vasculogenic induction, differentiation, growth and patterning. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying vascular development are rapidly emerging. In this symposium, recent findings will be presented that provide new insight into both the intracellular signaling pathways and the role of the extracellular matrix in vessel morphogenesis.

Takashi Mikawa (Univ. California, San Francisco)
Physiological Suppressors of Vascular Development
George Davis (Texas A&M Univ.)
The Role of Extracellular Matrix in Vascular Morphogenesis
Paul Krieg (Univ. of Arizona)
Apelin as a Regulator of Angiogenesis & Lymphangiogenesis
Victoria Bautch (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
The Role of Fit-1 (VEGFR-1) Vascular Morphogenesis

VASCULAR STEM AND PROGENITOR CELLS
Chair: Karen Hirschi (Baylor College of Medicine)
2:30-4:30 PM

This session focuses on understanding the parallel development of the vascular and hematopoietic systems during embryogenesis, and the molecular signaling pathways that control these processes. Data to be presented will lend insight into the origin, fate, and function of vascular progenitor cells in adult tissues, which will also be discussed.

Elaine Dzierzak (Erasmus Univ.)
Origins of Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Mervin Yoder (Indiana Univ.)
Redefining Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Bruno Peault (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Multipotent Progenitor Cells in the Walls of Human Blood Vessels
Karen Hirschi (Baylor College of Medicine)
Specification & Regulation of Hemogenic Endothelium

Tuesday, May 1

VESSEL CELL BIOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT
Chair: Victoria Bautch (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
8:00-10:00 AM


The goal of this session is to highlight recent advances in our understanding of the cellular processes involved in blood vessel formation. Exciting new models that describe how cells interact with other cells and the environment have been established, but how these processes are used and integrated during blood vessel formation is not well documented. These investigators use cell biological approaches to better understand vascular development, and integrate genetic and molecular tools as well.

Mary Dickinson (Baylor College of Medicine)
Understanding Dynamic Events in Vasculogenesis & Remodeling in Mammalian Embryos Using Live Cell Imaging
Holger Gerhardt (London Research Institute)
Endothelial Guidance in Vascular Patterning
Luisa Iruela-Arispe (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Signaling Pathways that Regulate Vascular Lumen Formation
Brant Weinstein (National Institutes of Health)
Assembly of Endothelial Tubes

EDUCATION and TEACHING TRACK

Saturday, April 28

WORKSHOP - SURVIVAL TECH: TOOLS FOR MASTERING CURRICULAR CHANGE IN ANATOMY
Chair: Robert Trelease (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
10:30-12:30 AM

With the mature web and commercial multimedia software, anatomists have proven tools for supporting education. While soundness of instructional methods seems paramount, limited resources, time cuts, and curricular changes can push adoption of new technologies. This workshop presents real approaches to reducing lecture time, integrating clinically oriented laboratories, automating instruction, and assessing new technology. Participants will share their own challenges, strategies, and concerns for the role of technology in the evolution of anatomical sciences.

Thomas Gest (Univ. of Michigan)
Better Learning through Less Teaching: Eliminating Lectures
Don Hilbelink (Univ. of South Florida)
Human Morpho-Informatics: Teaching Anatomy by the Numbers
Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ.)
Neato, Nifty, Cool, or Pedagogical Advance? Designing Effective Web-based Tools
Robert Trelease (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Diffusion of Innovation: New Media & Lessons from the iPod

MASTER CLASS - KIDNEY STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
Chair: Vincent Gattone (Indiana Univ.)
1:00-3:00 PM

The introduction will review the current nomenclature for renal components. The current understanding of the structural/functional aspects of the glomerular filtration barrier, for which there has been an explosion of cell and molecular advances over the last decade, are reviewed. The cell biology of renal epithelia and their involvement in various normal and pathological states is discussed. The juxtaglomerular apparatus and our understanding of its functioning in tubuloglomerular feedback will be reviewed by the world's expert. And finally, kidney development, incorporating branching morphogenesis and induction of mesenchyme to form epithelia and tubules will be discussed. This session is designed to provide some breadth, but also the present state of knowledge in the areas of glomerular filtration barrier, tubuloglomerular feedback and renal epithelia in polycystic kidney disease.

Vincent Gattone (Indiana Univ.)
The Kidney-Introduction to its Structure and Function
Deborah Hyink (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Normal & Abnormal Kidney Development
Robert Bacallao (Indiana Univ.)
Renal Tubulas; Diversity with Distinction or Therapies and Disease
Jürgen Schnermann (National Institutes of Health)
Tubuloglomerular Feedback - A System for Nephron Self-Regulation


Sunday, April 29

SCHOLARSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY: CVs, PORTFOLIOS & PROMOTIONS
2:30-4:30 PM
Chair: Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

The academic world is rapidly changing with departments, leadership, and advancement criteria constantly morphing. As such, we must be cognizant of the promotion process and how to interact effectively with it. To increase both our awareness of the promotion process and our preparation to engage it, this symposium explores: 1) the nature of scholarship and how it is evaluated; 2) our curriculum vitae and how to construct a modern one; and 3) the growing importance of Teaching Portfolios for educators.

Douglas Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
The Promotion Process
Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah)
The Nature of Scholarship: What It Is, What It Is Not
Suzanne Rose (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Perfecting Your Portfolio: Preparing for Promotion
Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Promotion & Your Curriculum Vitae: Your First, Last, & Best Chance to Make an Impression

Monday, April 30

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
8:00-10:00 AM

WALK-JOG-RUN: WHATEVER SWINGS YOUR GAIT
10:30-12:30 PM
Chairs: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) & Kimberly Topp (Univ. of California San Francisco)

This session will begin with a conceptual approach to understanding and teaching neuromusculoskeletal anatomy through human gait, focusing on neuromuscular compartments and muscular agonists, antagonists, synergists and fixators. We will explore the differences between walking and running, and the mechanics associated with running injuries. Current techniques in 3-dimensional gait analysis, and key features of abnormal gait will be reviewed. Lastly, we will highlight common peripheral and central nervous system lesions that adversely affect gait.


Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ.)
Anatomy of Normal Human Gait
Irene Davis (Univ. of Delaware)
Running: A Threshold for Injury
Fabian Pollo (Baylor Univ.)
Gait Analysis: Techniques & Recognition of Abnormal Gait
Kimberly Topp (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Gait Patterns Characteristic of Nervous System Pathologies Provide Teaching Opportunities in Anatomy

Tuesday, May 1

REFRESHER COURSE - THE ANATOMY OF AGING: WHAT SHOULD WE BE TEACHING OUR MEDICAL STUDENTS?
Supported by The Ellison Medical Foundation
Chairs: Wayne Lambert (University of Louisville) & Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
8:00-10:00 AM


Because people 65 and older will represent 20% of the US population by 2030, this symposium will focus on training both educators and physicians in the anatomical changes that occur with aging. Speakers will discuss age-related changes in the musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, neurological, and urogenital systems and recent research in these areas.

Arthur Dalley (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Osteophytes for Neophytes: What Every Medical Student Should Know About the Anatomy of the Musculoskeletal System and Advancing Age
Mark Evers (Univ. of Texas)
Aging & the Gastrointestinal Tract: Food for Thought
John Morrison (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Life & Death of Neurons in the Aging Brain
Susan Tate (Univ. of Louisville)
Changes in Urogenital Anatomy of Post-menopausal Women

SYMPOSIA

Sunday, April 29

OXIDATIVE STRESS IN STEM CELL BIOLOGY
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
2:30-4:30 PM

Formation of reactive oxygen species is a normal physiological process that traditionally has been studied in the context of injury. Recent evidence suggests that oxygen influences the course of normal development and morphogenesis. Levels of antioxidant could be differentially expressed between stem cells and their progeny. Furthermore, the redox state could modulate intrinsic and extrinsic stem cell characteristics. This interdisciplinary symposium brings together investigators involved in redox signaling and stem cell biology to discuss an exciting field of investigation.

Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
Antioxidant Enzyme Expression in Epidermal Progenitor Cells
Zvonimir Katusic (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)
Expression & Function of Antioxidant Enzymes in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Mark Nobel (Univ. of Rochester)
Redox Regulation of Progenitor Cell Function in Development & Pathology
Heinrich Sauer (University of Giessen)
Reactive Oxygen Species as Messengers in Signaling Pathways Leading to Cardiovascular Differentiation

DISEASE CONNECTIONS IN DEVELOPMENT
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Hazel Sive (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
2:30-4:30 PM

The connection between processes occurring during normal development and disorders that manifest in the adult continues to become stronger and stronger. Putting this together with conservation of gene function makes for a timely and exciting symposium. This diverse and interesting session includes zebrafish and mouse models of cardiovascular, neural, and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as exploration of stem cells in zebrafish. Discussion of criteria that make a "good" disease model will be encouraged.

Hazel Sive (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Understanding Human Neurodevelopmental Health Disorders through Zebrafish Genetics & Imaging
David Parichy (Univ. of  Washington)
Latent Stem Cells in the Zebrafish Post-Embryonic Neural Crest
Anne Moon (Univ. of Utah)
The role of F3f8 in Cardiovascular Development and Human Congenital Heart Disease
Michael Pack (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Modeling Cancer & Other Digestives Diseases in Zebrafish

Monday, April 30

BIOENGINEERING IN DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE
Chair: Jay Potts (Univ. of South Carolina)
8:00-10:00 AM

The discipline of bioengineering has progressed rapidly in the last decade. While the field has expanded quickly, there are still many hurdles to overcome. This symposium focuses on the progress of bioengineering in cardiovascular biology, ophthalmology, and skin. Speakers highlight data on new and promising scaffolds and materials they have designed to create replacement tissues. These studies represent cutting edge technologies in the rapidly evolving field of bioengineering.

Michael Sacks (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Differences in Tissue Remolding Potential of the Aortic and Pulmonary Heart Valve Interstitial Cells
David Simpson (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.)
Electrospinning in the Fabrilation of Physiologically Relevant Tissue Engineering Scaffolds for Dermal Reconstruction
Laura Niklason (Yale Univ.)
Stem Cells in Vascular Tissue Engineering
Machelle Pardue (Emory Univ.)
Retinal Prosthetics for the Restoration & Preservation of Vision

OLFACTORY NEUROBIOLOGY: FROM MOLECULES TO NETWORKS
Co-sponsored by the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Neurobiology Chairpersons (AACBNC)
Chair: Michael Shipley (Univ. of Maryland)
10:30-12:30 PM


Odorant molecules are transduced by olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the nose. ORNs express a single odorant receptor (OR) from a total of ~1000 ORs. ORNs with the same OR project a few fixed glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. The glomeruli, thus, comprise a spatial map that reflects the moment-to-moment activity of ORNs. The brain 'computes' the identity, concentration, and location of odors from these patterns of glomerular activity. This symposium presents new research elucidating the neural machinery of the olfactory bulb, the initial network in this computation.

Matthew Wachowiack (Boston Univ.)
The Role of Sniffing in Shaping the Primary Receptor Code for Odors
Matthew Ennis ( Univ. of Tennessee)
Glomeruli: Dynamic Portal into the Olfactory Brain
Ben Strowbridge (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
The Role of the Olfactory Bulb in Processing Sensory Information
Christine Linster ( Cornell Univ.)
Early Olfactory Computations & Perception

IMAGING LIVING TISSUE VASCULATURE
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
Chairs: Michiko Watanabe (Case Western Reserve Univ.) & Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah)
2:30-4:30PM

The vasculature is intimately involved in homeostasis and disease. Advances in imaging the vasculature within living organisms and tissue has been invaluable in understanding normal vascular structure and function, as well as diagnosing and intervening vascular diseases. This symposium brings together speakers who use the most advanced techniques to image the structure and function of the living vasculature. The dynamic nature of the vasculature presents challenges for in vivo imaging. One challenge is that the vasculature is three-dimensionally complex. Thus, imaging modalities that view tissue volume are necessary. Another challenge is that the vasculature in vivo is constantly changing and adjusting to the environment, including to interventions. Other challenges are detection and quantification of physiologically important, yet subtle, changes in blood rheology. Addressing these challenges, speakers describe optical coherence tomography as an emerging technology for functional vascular imaging; discuss and illustrate intravital imaging of the liver's microcirculation and its relationship to liver function; demonstrate finessed approaches to view the intracranial vasculature for diagnostic purposes; and compare concurrent imaging of lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis. These experts' presentations on in vivo vascular imaging provide a state-of-the-art synthesis of how to view the mature and developing vasculature, including lymphatic vessels, and assess vascular function in health and disease.

Dennis Parker (Univ. of Utah)
Intracranial Vascular Imaging
Karina Yaniv (National Institutes of Health)
Live Imaging of Lymphatic Development in the Zebrafish Embryo
Patricia Parsons-Wingerter (National Aeronautics & Space Administration)
Rapid Quantification of Normal & Abnormal Blood & Lymphatic Vasculature
Anjul Davis (Duke Univ.)
Optical Coherence Tomography: An Emerging Technology for Functional Vascular Imaging
John LeMaster (Univ. of South Carolina)
Intravital Imaging of Liver Function & Microcirculation

THE NEURAL CREST IN EVOLUTION & DEVELOPMENT
Supported by March of Dimes
Chairs: Tamara Franz-Odendaal (Mount Saint Vincent Univ.) & Brian Hall (Dalhousie Univ.)

2:30-4:30 PM

This symposium explores the neural crest, a vertebrate innovation, and neural crest cells with respect to evolutionary developmental biology. Experts on the neural crest and its cellular derivatives discuss the patterning and interactions of the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest cells within and among different vertebrate groups. In this way, they will provide valuable insights into the development and evolution of the cell populations, which enabled vertebrate tissues and organs to evolve.

Shigeru Kuratani (Center of Developmental Biology, RIKEN)
The Neural Crest & Evolution of the Vertebrate Body Plan
Lennart Olsson (Friedrich-Schiller-Univ.)
Patterning of the Cranial Neural Crest in Evo-Devo
Mary Hutson (Duke Univ.)
The Cardiac Neural Crest in Evo-Devo
Carol Erickson (Univ. of California, Davis)
Pathfinder by the Trunk Neural Crest: The Smart Cell Scenario
Drew Noden (Cornell Univ.)
Mechanisms of Cranial Neural Crest-Mesoderm Interactions

Tuesday, May 1

INDUCTION & PATTERNING OF THE EARLY KIDNEY
Chairs: Teri Jo Mauch (Univ. of Utah) & Peter Vize (Univ. of Calgary)
8:00-10:00 AM

Recent advances in technology and knowledge illuminate the process of kidney development. Data derived through conditional genetic manipulation, microarray, and large particle flow cytometry (COPAS™) casts new light on model systems ranging from the amphibian pronephros through the maturing mouse metanephros. Speakers discuss the roles of transcription and growth factors in mesenchymal-epithelial transformation, patterning and maturation of the ureteric bud, tubulogenesis, glomerulogenesis, and maintenance of the glomerular vasculature, demonstrating the power of animal models for clinical renal disease.

Peter Vize (Univ. of Calgary)
Microarray Analysis of Embryonic Kidney Patterning Signals
Thomas Carroll (Univ. of Texas)
The Role of Wnt9b in Epithelial Tuble Induction & Differentiation
Lance Miller (Univ. Utah)
Using High Throughput or COPAS to Study Collecting Duct Development
Susan Quaggin (Mount Sinai Hospital)
Mouse Models of Glomerulogenesis & Glomerular Disease

CURRENT APPROACHES FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING
Chairs: Nicolas L'Heureux (Cytograft Tissue Engineering, Inc.) & Todd McAllister (Cytograft Tissue Engineering, Inc.)
10:30-12:30 PM


After more than two decades of research in the fields of tissue engineering, cell-based therapies, and regenerative medicine, we appear to be at the dawn of widespread clinical application.This symposium presents four fundamentally different tissue replacement strategies. While these approaches vary in terms of target, state of development, complexity, cost, antigenicity, potential functionality, and clinical availability, together they provide a good picture of the current and future landscape of clinical tissue engineering.

Nicolas L'Heureux (Cytograft Tissue Engineering, Inc.)
Tissue Engineering of a Completely Biological & Autologous Human Blood Vessel for Adult Arterial Revascularization
Mark Van Dyke (Wake Forest Univ.)
Total Organ Replacement Using Tissue Engineering
Stephen Badylak (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
The Extracellular Matrix as a Scaffold for Regenerative Medicine
Howard Greisler (Loyola Univ. Medical Center)
All Matrices are Smart Matrices

THE INS & OUTS OF CIRCADIAN ORGANIZATION
Chair: Lance Kriegsfeld (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
2:30-4:30 PM

An endogenous circadian timing system is essential for maintaining optimal health and physiological functioning. Disruptions in circadian timing are associated with a range of health concerns. This symposium explores circadian function at each level of organization, from input to clock function to output. The symposium begins with an examination of how the circadian clock is synchronized to local time via a novel retinal ganglion cell population. From retinal transduction pathways, the cellular mechanisms and local network organization necessary for rhythm generation is explored. The symposium concludes with output pathways and neurochemical systems by which rhythmic information is communicated to target effectors.

Samer Hattar (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
How Rods & Cones Signal Light Information for Non-Image Forming Visual Functions
Erik Herzog (Washington Univ.)
From Clock to Clock Shops: Intra & Intercellular Mechanisms Regulating Daily Timekeeping
Rae Silver (Barnard College & Columbia Univ.)
Building a Mammalian Brain Clock
Lance Kriegsfeld (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
Regulation of Neuroendocrine Function & Ovulation: It's All in the Timing

Wednesday, May 2

MORPHOGENESIS MEETS MATHEMATICS: HOW EMBRYOGENESIS CAN BE QUANTIFIED
Chair: Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas)
8:00-10:00 AM


Recent multi-disciplinary studies, using the computational methods of mathematics, physics, and engineering, enable dynamic quantification of embryonic morphogenesis — including cellular trajectories, tissue deformation patterns, and bioengineering stress/strain relationships. The data can then be used to construct predictive models, in silico, that will greatly aid experimental design and the interpretation of complicated data. Similar to deciphering weather patterns, understanding vertebrate morphogenesis will require complex systems analyses that span wide time and length scales.

Lance Davidson (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Forces That Shape the Embryo: Biomechanics of Gastrulation
Evan Zamir (Univ. of Kansas)
Multiscale Analysis of Cell & Tissue Patterning During Morphogenesis

James Glazier (Indiana Univ.)
Computing an Organism: Cell-Level Modeling of Developmental Phenomena
Larry Taber (Washington Univ.)
Biomechanical Modeling of Cardiac Looping
Wayne Brodland (Univ. of Waterloo)
The Mechanics of Neurulation: Insights from a Whole-embryo Computational Model

NEUROVASCULAR INTERACTIONS IN DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Supported by Genetech
Chair: Nicole Ward (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
8:00-10:00 AM

Despite the overlapping similarities between the vascular and nervous systems, including anatomical patterning and development, and their concurrent participation in disease, little is known about the co-dependence and/or the mechanisms governing the relationship between the two systems. This session is devoted to recent advances in understanding neurovascular interactions. Areas of focus include the roles of growth factors, growth factor signaling, and guidance molecules and their effects in both systems.

Yosuke Mukoyama (National Institutes of Health)
Nerve-Vessel Interactions During Vertebrate Development
Jean Leon Thomas (Hôpital de la Salpêtrière)
Vegfr3 & Vegfc: Newcomers in Neurovascular Cross-Talk
Anne Eichmann (Collège de France)
Molecular Mecanisms Controling Vessel Branching & Morphogenesis
Barbara Hempstead (Cornell Univ.)
Neurotrophins: Novel Mediators of Angiogenesis

THE IMPACT OF ANATOMY EDUCATION BEYOND THE FIRST YEAR
Co-sponsored by the Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chair: Ann Zumwalt (Duke Univ.)
8:00-10:00 AM


Due to reductions in curriculum hours dedicated to anatomy in the first year of training, a number of anatomy departments across the country offer advanced, clinically-focused anatomy courses during the 2th-4th years of medical training. This symposium highlights some of these programs in the hopes of illustrating and fostering discussion about innovative ways to expand and enhance anatomy education in the medical school curriculum.

Anne Gilroy (Univ. of Massachusetts)
A Long-term Perspective on Advanced Clinical Anatomy Programs
Arthur Dalley (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Anatomy: It's Not Just for Breakfast Anymore! Teaching Anatomy throughout the Continuum of Medical Education
Alexander van Nievelt (Duke Univ.)
What They Need, When They Need It: Easy-to-Assemble Custom Anatomy Modules for the Clinical Years
Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Anatomy Education: Longitudinal by Design

DIGITAL EMBRYONIC ATLASES: A TOOL FOR EDUCATION & RESEARCH
Chair: Rusty Lansford (California Institute of Technology)
10:30-12:30 PM


Developmental atlases provide precise information about the dramatic anatomical changes associated with an organism's progress from fertilized egg to neonate. There is a current movement to publishing 3D embryonic atlases on the Internet so that they are accessible to educators, students, and researchers. Our session pulls together researchers generating embryonic databases that are anatomically delineated in 3D and allow access to other types of information, including gene expression and cell migration data.

Richard Baldock (Western General Hospital)
The Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project: Data Mapping & Spatial Organization
Nathaniel Heintz (Rockefeller Univ.)
Molecular Definition of CNS Cell Types & Their Physiologic Responses in Health & Disease
Seth Ruffins (California Institute of Technology)
An MRI Atlas of Quail Development
Brant Weinstein (National Institutes of Health)
Imaging the Developing Vasculature in the Zebrafish

PLATFORMS SESSIONS
AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.

Monday, April 30

CELL MOTILITY & BEHAVIOR
Sponsored by Carl Zeiss Microimaging
Chair: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
8:00-10:00 AM
Mary Halloran
(Univ. of Wisconsin)
Katherine Moynihan (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Frances Lefcort (Montana State Univ.)
Julian Guttman (Univ. of British Columbia)
James Tomasek (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Saami Yazdani (Wake Forest Univ.)
Bill Meek (Oklahoma State Univ.)
Rebecca McLennan (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)

HARD MECHANICS OF SOFT TISSUE
Chairs: William Craelius (Rutgers Univ.) & Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
10:30-12:30 PM
M. Cattaruzza
(Univ. of Heidelberg)
David Shreiber (Rutgers Univ.)
William Craelius (Rutgers Univ.)
Johnathan Perry (Duke Univ.)
Dinesh Pai (Univ. of British Columbia)
Adam Hartstone-Rose (Duke Univ.)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS
Chair: Lawrence Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)
2:30-4:30 PM
Lawrence Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Robert Trelease (Univ.of California, Los Angeles)
Timothy Wilson (Univ. of Western Ontario)
Richard Doolittle (Rochester Institute of Technology)
Yasuharu Okuda (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Kritine Vogel (UTHSCSA)
Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
William Simpson (Mount Sinai School of Medicine Radiology)


Tuesday, May 1

SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT & REPAIR
Sponsored by Baylor College of Dentistry
Chair: Lynne Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry)
8:00-10:00 AM
Wei-Wen Hu
(Univ. of Michigan)
Viktoria Gagarina (National Institutes of Health)
Mohammed Elsalanty (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Zongyang Sun (Univ. of Washington)
Shirin Zare (Wake Forest Univ.)
Israel Arango-Hisijara (Temple Univ.)
Jennifer Amos (Univ. of South Carolina)
Armand Balboni (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)


KIDNEY DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Chair: Carl Bates (Columbus Children's Research Institute)
10:30-12:30 PM
Alan Davidson
(Massachusetts General Hospital)
Hiroyuki Sakurai (University of California, San Diego)
Roy Zent (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Ben Fogelgren (Univ. of Hawaii SOM)
Kirk McHugh (Columbus Children's Research Institute)
Thomas Schultheiss (Harvard Univ.)


TEACHING INNOVATIONS
Chair: Andrew Payer (Florida State Univ.)
10:30-12:30 PM
Stephen Moorman
(Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Nagaswami Vasan (New Jersey Medical School)
Brent Johnson (Vanderbilt Univ.)

Kathy Svoboda (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)
James Walker (Purdue Univ., Indiana Univ.)
Yulia Khan (Mayo Clinic)
Marc Pizzimenti (Univ. of Iowa)
James Johnson (Wake Forest Univ.)


VASCULOGENESIS/ANGIOGENESIS/ARTERIOGENESIS
Chair: Ronald Torry (Drake Univ.)
10:30-12:30 PM
James Faber
(Univ. of North Carolina)
Jai Singh (Eli Lilly and Company)
Pamela Lloyd (Oklahoma State Univ.)
Ola Awad (Univ. of Iowa)
Richard Goodwin (Univ. of South Carolina)
Eric Gee (York Univ.)

STEM CELLS & REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
Chair: David Stocum (Indiana Univ.)
2:30-4:30 PM
Sean Hall (Queen's Univ.)
Nathaniel Hwang (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Michelle Sukup (Univ. of Iowa)
Yao Fei Hu (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Ellen Heber-Katz (The Wister Institute)
Teri Belecky-Adams (Indiana Univ. - Purdue Univ. Indianapolis)
Ellen Chernoff (Indiana Univ. - Purdue Univ. Indianapolis)
Holly Nye (Univ. of Illinois)

TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMICAL SCIENCES
Chair: Thierry Bacro (Univ. of South Carolina)
2:30-4:30 PM
Avner Yemin (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Branislav Vidic (Texas Tech Univ.)
David Morton (Univ. of Utah)
Vaughan Lee (Texas Tech Univ.)
Terence Ma (Touro Univ. Nevada)
Carrie Sager (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Lloyd Sherman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Marina D'Angelo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)


Wednesday, May 2

PATTERNING IN DEVELOPMENT
Sponsored by Protech International
Chair: Kerby Oberg (Loma Linda Univ.)
8:00-10:00 AM
F. Chen (Boston University School of Medicine)
Edwina McGlinn (Harvard Univ.)
Jamie Verheyden (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison)
Norboru Mishima (Loma Linda Univ.)
Cheng Cui (Univ. of Kansas)
Jamie Wikenheiser (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Ke Yang (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
David Sedmera (Charles Univ.)
Elizabeth Jones (College de France)

LIMB EVOLUTION & DEVELOPMENT
Chair: Jo Ann Cameron (Univ. of Illinois)
10:30-12:30 PM
David Stocum (Indiana Univ. - Purdue Univ. Indianapolis)
Karen Crawford (St. Mary's College of Maryland)
Jianjian Zhu (National Institutes of Health)
Sean Hasso (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Jamie Verheyden (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison)
Jennifer Feenstra (Loma Linda Univ.)
Christine Pomikal (Medical Univ. of Vienna)
Virgina Naples (Northern Illinois Univ.)

MUSCLE DEVELOPMENT: STEM TO STERN
Chairs: Michael Ferrari (Univ. of Missouri) & Judith Venuti (LSU Health Science Center)
10:30-12:30 PM
Prakash Rao (Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research)
Ketan Patel (Univ. of Reading)
Jeff Eskew (Univ. of Missouri)
Andrei Borisov (Univ. of Michigan)
Karen Berry (San Francisco State Univ.)
Kyla Huebner (Univ. of Manitoba)
Mohammed Allouh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)

Rui Duan (Indiana Univ.)


POSTER TOPICS
AAA Poster Sessions are organized based on submitted abstracts. Authors are required to be at their posters from 12:30 – 2:00 PM on the day they are scheduled.

Sunday, April 29
ANIMAL MODELS OF DISEASE
MYOFIBROBLASTS & MYOEPITHELIAL CELLS
REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
STEM CELL BIOLOGY
VASCULAR BIOLOGY**

Monday, April 30
COMPARATIVE & EVOLUTIONARY ANATOMY
IMAGING & MICROSCOPY
INFLAMMATION, WOUND HEALING & REMODELING
NEUROBIOLOGY

Tuesday, May 1
ANATOMICAL FORM & FUNCTION
AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM
BONE, CARTILAGE & CONNECTIVE TISSUE
CARDIAC BIOLOGY
 

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