2008 Annual Meeting - San Diego

April 5-9, 2008 - San Diego, CA


KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Harold Dvorak, M.D.

Mallinckrodt Professor of Pathology, Department of Pathological Anatomy, Harvard Medical School
Chief, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Angiogenesis: The Importance of Anatomy

Sunday, April 6, 6:15-7:15 PM, Room 8



 


PLENARY SPEAKERS

Scott Fraser, Ph.D. (California Institute of Technology)
Director, Biological Imaging Center, Beckman Institute
Anna L. Rosen Professor of Biology
Imaging the Cell Motions, Lineages & Interactions that Build Embryos
Sunday, April 6, 8:00-9:00 AM, Room 7A/B

Reductionistic approaches have yielded unprecedented knowledge of the components involved biological processes, and present the challenge of integrating this into a complete understanding. For example, the revolution in molecular biology has yielded dramatic new insights into the genes and gene products that might guide embryonic development. To answer the basic question of how an embryo develops, we must determine how these molecular processes are assembled into the working macroscopic entities we call organisms. Biological imaging provides a natural solution to such challenges, but must resolve several competing demands, including: the high resolution needed to track single cells; the challenge of imaging cells in their normal positions in vivo; the need for true volumetric imaging; the wide field of view needed to place these images in context. No single technique has offered the needed combination of attributes, making our present challenge to integrate data from different modalities. I will draw on new findings from the Biological Imaging Center using intravital imaging to illustrate the current state of our misunderstandings and of the imaging technologies that may resolve them.

 


Carlos A.G. Machado, M.D. (Elsevier, Inc.)
Medical Illustrator
Following the Trail of Frank Netter, Master Anatomical Illustrator
Sunday, April 6, 9:00-10:00 AM, Room 7A/B

For decades Dr. Frank Netter's medical illustrations have been admired and have taught medicine to health students, health professionals and the lay public all over the world. Dr. Netter's unique style, tech-nique, talent, knowledge and remarkable body of work that comprises more than 6,000 illustrated plates, with over 20,000 individual images, is still unsurpassed by the most prestigious contemporary medical illustrators. One of the key factors that made his style so distinguished is the association of the appealing language and concepts of commercial and advertising illustration with the transmission of scientific knowledge. For 14 years, in my updating of the illustrations in the Netter Atlas of Human Anatomy as well as many other Netter publications, I have faced the challenging mission of continuing Dr. Netter's legacy, of following and understanding his concepts, and of reproducing his style by using his favorite techniques. This lecture analyzes the factors that influenced Dr. Netter's style and contributed to his suc-cess. It also shows similarities and differences between his and my professional training, styles, concepts and particular techniques.


 

AAA AWARD LECTURES

R.R. BENSLEY AWARD LECTURE IN CELL BIOLOGY

Ramanujan Hegde (National Institutes of Health)
The Biosynthesis of Secretory & Membrane Proteins
Sunday, April 6, 5:00-6:00 PM, Room 10

Secretory and membrane proteins are essential to all intercellular and most intracellular communication, and their precise locations and abundances are tightly regulated to maintain normal organismal physiology. Indeed, the majority of current drugs target secreted and membrane proteins, underscoring their central role in human biology. Our laboratory is working to develop a molecular level understanding of the pathways of secretory and membrane protein biosynthesis and metabolism. We are especially interested in the regulatory machinery controlling protein entry and insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the site where nearly all secreted and membrane proteins are first made. Biochemical approaches are being employed to purify, identify, and functionally reconstitute the machinery underlying these basic cellular pathways. In parallel, the physiologic importance of regulating the metabolism of secretory and membrane proteins are being analyzed in cellular and whole animal models. We anticipate that a greater understanding of these basic cellular pathways will provide insight into the various diseases caused by problems in protein localization, folding, and processing.

C.J. HERRICK AWARD LECTURE IN NEUROANATOMY

Thomas Klausberger (Oxford Univ.)
GABAergic Circuits in the Hippocampus
Monday, April 7, 5:00-6:00 PM, Room 10

In the hippocampal CA1 area a relative homogenous group of pyramidal cells is accompanied by 21 dif-ferent classes of GABAergic interneurons. Different interneurons make synapses with distinct compartments of pyramidal cells, but why is such a large diversity of distinct interneurons required? We recorded from identified interneurons in vivo and showed that interneurons targeting different domains of pyramidal cells exhibited distinct firing patterns. The spike timing of parvalbumin expressing basket and axo-axonic cells indicates roles in synchronizing the sub-threshold oscillations and output of pyramidal cells, respectively. The spike timing of bistratified and O-LM cells, which innervate dendrites of pyramidal cells in the stratum radiatum and lacunosum-moleculare, respectively, suggests their role in phasing EPSPs and de-inactivating voltage-gated ion channels of pyramidal cells; bistratified cells also synchronise oblique pyramidal cells dendrites to field gamma oscillations. We discovered GABAergic neurons projecting to subiculum, retrosplenial cortex and medial septum, possibly supporting synchronisation across brain areas. Another class of interneuron expresses neuronal nitric oxide synthase and provides slowly-rising GABAergic inhibition in pyramidal cells. Our results indicate that different GABAergic interneuron release GABA at distinct times to different domains of pyramidal cells explaining the need of diverse classes of interneurons.

H.W. MOSSMAN AWARD LECTURE IN DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
Sean Morrison (Univ. of Michigan)
The Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal
Tuesday, April 8, 5:00-6:00 PM, Room 10

The mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal are fundamental to the formation and maintenance of normal hematopoiesis as well as hematopoietic malignancies. Fetal stem cells differ phenotypically and functionally from adult stem cells in diverse tissues. However, little is known about how these differences are regulated. To address this we compared the gene expression profiles of fetal versus adult hematopoi-etic stem cells (HSCs) and discovered that the Sox17 transcription factor is specifically and preferentially expressed in fetal and neonatal but not adult HSCs (Cell 130:470). Germline deletion of Sox17 led to se-vere fetal hematopoietic defects, including a lack of detectable definitive HSCs. Conditional deletion of Sox17 led to the loss of fetal and neonatal but not adult HSCs. Sox17 expression by HSCs was extin-guished three to four weeks after birth as HSCs acquired adult properties. During this transition, loss of Sox17 expression by individual cells correlated with slower proliferation and the acquisition of an adult phenotype. Sox17 thus distinguishes the transcriptional regulation of fetal and neonatal HSCs from that of adult HSCs. As HSCs enter the postnatal period, they become dependent upon the polycomb family transcriptional repressor, Bmi-1. Bmi-1 is required for the postnatal maintenance of every type of stem cell yet examined including HSCs (Nature 423:302, 2003) and neural stem cells (Nature 425:962, 2003). Bmi-1-deficient mice die by early adulthood with stem cell depletion, growth retardation, ataxia, and seizures. These phenotypes correlate with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16Ink4a and the p53 agonist p19Arf, which promote cellular senescence. Deletion of Ink4a and/or Arf from Bmi-1-/- mice partially rescues stem cell self-renewal and stem cell frequency (G&D 19:1432, 2005). Despite ongoing Bmi-1 expression, Ink4a expression increases with age, reducing stem cell frequency and function (Na-ture 443:448). The regulation of stem cell self-renewal throughout life by networks of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors emphasizes the mechanistic links between stem cell self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation. AAA STUDENT/POSTDOCTORAL PLATFORM SESSIONS

LANGMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATION
Chair: Christine Eckel (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Saturday, April 5, 3:30-5:15 PM, Room 8

Jia Yao (Univ. of Southern California)
Estrogen Regulation of Mitochondrial Function is Pivotal for Protection Against Alzheimer's Disease
Kimberly Anne McDowell (Unv. of Maryland School of Medicine)
Sleep Alteration in an Environmental Neurotoxin Induced Model of Parkinson's Disease
Jianming Liu (Univ. of Illinois)
Genetically determined proteolytic cleavage modulates Α7Β1 integrin functions
Derek Wainwright (Loyola Univ. Chicago)
T cells and chemokine expression in the CNS: relevance to motoneuron injury and ALS
Andrea DeSantis (Rutgers Univ.)
An Organ Culture Model for Studying Corneal Wound Healing
Ashley Brooke Clausner (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Wrist Osteology: Do students prefer stereoscopic lectures?
Troy Camarata (Northwestern Univ.)
Tbx5 subcellular regulation by LMP4 during pectoral fin development

PRESLEY-ZEISS POSTDOCTORAL PLATFORM AWARD PRESENTATION
Chair: David Jackowe (Univ. of Hawaii School of Medicine)
Saturday, April 5, 5:45-6:15 PM, Room 8

Andre Luiz Pasqua Tavares (Univ. of Arizona)
Temporal pattern of expression of EMT molecular markers in the chicken embryo heart.
Ryan Robert Kerney (Dalhousie Univ.)
Cellular Changes of the Skull During Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis

PLENARY SYMPOSIA THE ART OF ANATOMY
Chairs:David Jackowe (Univ. of Hawaii School of Medicine) & David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Sunday, April 6, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 8

Gross anatomy is a visual science. Here, a structure is a shape of tissue defined and understood both by its function and its relation to other structures. In creating an anatomy text, medical illustrators must accurately capture this multi-dimensionalism. Different creative perspectives from different artists therefore create different anatomies. For most students today, textbook illustrations are the predominant medium with which they will have a relationship with the anatomy. Furthermore, for many professors and clinicians, illustrations remain an indispensable resources for continued learning and improvement of practice. This session invites representatives from the most ubiquitous anatomy atlases, including Gray's, Netter, Clemente, Thieme, and Grant's, to discuss the philosophy and methods behind the artwork. The session will conclude with an art show, with illustrations available for gallery-style viewing.

Elsevier:
 •&nbspNetter Atlas of Human Anatomy
 •&nbspGray's Atlas of Anatomy
 •&nbspGray's Anatomy

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins:
 •&nbspClemente Atlas of Anatomy
 •&nbspGrant's Atlas of Anatomy
 •&nbspLWW Atlas of Anatomy

Thieme:
 •&nbspThieme Atlas of Anatomy

NEURAL CREST CELLS: EVOLUTION, DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Chair: Paul Trainor (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Sunday, April 6, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7A/B

Neural crest cells are a stem and progenitor population that are generated transiently during embryogene-sis and persist well into adult life. In the head, neural crest cells generate most of the bone, cartilage, pe-ripheral nervous system and connective tissue and are synonymous with vertebrate craniofacial evolu-tion. This session explores the evolutionary origins of neural crest cells, their contribution to vertebrate development and the mechanism by which defects in their patterning lead to congenital birth defects.

Marianne Bronner-Fraser (California Institute of Technology)
Regulatory Events in Neural Crest Formation
Rebecca McLennan (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
The role of neuropilins in cranial neural crest cell migration
Philip Brauer (Creighton Univ.)
A MMP-independent role for TIMP-2 during cardiac neural crest cell migration
Jennifer Kasemeier-Kulesa (Stowers Institute)
Investigation into the mechanisms mediating the dorsal migration of sympathetic ganglia
Ralph Marcucio (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions during Facial Development in Mice
Paul Trainor (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Neural Crest Cells & Congenital Craniofacial Defects IMAGING WORKSHOPS REVEALING ANATOMY THROUGH MEDICAL IMAGING
Chairs: Carol Nichols (Medical College of Georgia) & Jon Jackson (Univ. of North Dakota)
Saturday, April 5, 3:30-6:00 PM, Room 10

Would you like to discover some exciting new ideas for including more medical imaging into your gross anatomy courses? Then join us as we demonstrate several medical imaging modalities that are sure to enhance gross anatomy education. Learn how to incorporate ultrasound technology in the anatomy lab, how to integrate case-based radiology in the classroom and on line, and how to develop 3-Dimensional anatomy images and animations using Osirix© and other software.

Andrew Swift (Medical College of Georgia)
3-Dimensional Reconstruction from Diagnostic Imaging: Osirix—a New Tool for the Medical Illustrator/Animator
Kenneth Ruit (Univ. of North Dakota)
Incorporating Imaging into a Case-Based First-Year Anatomy Curriculum
K. Bo Foreman (Univ. of Utah College of Health & School of Medicine)
The Use of Osirix & Adobe Flash to Deliver Case-Based Radiology to the Classroom & through the Internet
E.F. "Ted" Fogarty (Univ. of North Dakota)
Making Cents of Osirix: Workstation Class Medical Imaging in the Gross Lab
IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENT: TRACING CELL LINEAGE
Supported by an educational grant from Carl Zeiss Microimaging, Inc.
Chair: Rebecca McLennan (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Saturday, April 5, 12:30-3:00 PM, Room 10

Advances in imaging technology are offering unique cellular insights that now permit us to trace cell movements for longer time periods in intact living organisms. The speakers will present exciting labeling and imaging methods adapted to visualize events in developing zebrafish, mice and chick as well as adult mice. Featured topics will include: studies of the biological roles of receptors and their ligands in heart development, intricate cell behaviors underlying palatogeneis, novel approaches to examine gene function in migrating cells during organogenesis, and dynamics of neuronal cells in behaving animals.

Yoshiko Takahashi (Nara Institute of Science & Technology)
Transposon–mediated Stable Integration of Genes into Migrating Cells During Organogenesis
Henry Sucov (Univ. of Southern California)
Tracing Cell Lineage in Mammalian Cardiovascular Development
Johann Eberhart (Univ. of Oregon)
Live Imaging in Zebrafish Reveals Cell Behaviors Underlying Palatogenesis
Mark Schnitzer (Stanford Univ.)
Chronic & Portable Fluorescence Microscopy in Freely Moving Mice
EDUCATION & TEACHING TRACK Saturday, April 5 WORKSHOP: COPYRIGHT ISSUES IN USING DIGITAL RESOURCES FOR TEACHING IN ANATOMICAL SCIENCES Chair: Theirry Bacro (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
10:00 AM-12:00 PM, Room 8

Over the last few years, universities across the United States have become increasingly aware of copy-right issues due to a number of legal cases involving copyright infringement. The field of anatomical sci-ences has been particularly interested in these matters since historically, faculty members have drawn rather freely from existing resources to teach. To address these issues, academic centers have been re-viewing their policies and educating their faculty members in order to enhance compliance with the exist-ing laws. This workshop will present the perspectives of an author writing medical books, a publisher of medical educational resources, a lawyer working in an academic setting, as well as a faculty member in-volved in educating faculty about copyright issues. Strategies and resources to improve compliance with copyright laws in academic environment, in general, and in the field of anatomical sciences, in particular, will be discussed and presented.

Bruce Carlson (Univ. of Michigan)
Copyright Issues: An Author's Perspective
Madelene Hyde (Elsevier, Inc.)
Copyright Issues: A Publisher's Perspective
William (Chip) Hood (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Copyright Issues: A Lawyer's Perspective
Thierry Bacro (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Copyright Issues: A Faculty Member's Perspective

MASTER CLASS: PHYSICAL THERAPY & FASCIA
Chair: Robert Spears (Baylor College of Dentistry)
12:30-3:00 PM, Room 8

Fasciae are connective tissue layers that envelope the organs, muscles, and neurovascular structures, or-ganizing the body into discrete regions with specialized functions and forming a continuous three-dimensional matrix of structural support. While most anatomical courses teach aspects relating to the fas-ciae, for many it remains a topic of uncertainty. The focus will be to review the basic histological and structural organization of the fasciae with special emphasis on regional organization and function.

Marion Gordon (EMSOP, Rutgers Univ.)
Histology & Organization of the Fascia
David Grogan (Texas A & M Health Science Center)
Fascia of the Head & Neck and Spread of Infection
Jennifer Brueckner (Univ. of Kentucky College of Medicine)
Fascia of the Abdomen & Pelvis
Mike Benjamin (Cardiff Univ.)
Fascia of the Limbs—Histological & Biomechanical Considerations

Sunday, April 6 THE ART OF ANATOMY INTEGRATION OF EMBRYOLOGY & ANATOMY
Co-sponsored by Anatomical Sciences Education
Supported by educational grants from Elsevier and Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Chairs: Keith L. Moore (Univ. of Toronto) & Arthur Dalley (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 8

The time allotted for teaching Embryology in medical and dental schools varies from 4 to 25 hours. An adequate course cannot be taught in 4 hours,even when assigned readings are given in Embryology and Molecular Biology books. The way to overcome this problem is to integrate embryology with other aspects of anatomy: gross anatomy, Neuroanatomy, Histology, Cell Biology and Molecular Biology. Experts in all these areas will explain how this may be done.

Arthur Dalley (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
Integration of Embryology & Gross Anatomy
Duane Haines (Univ. of Mississippi Medical Center)
Integration of Embryology & Neuroanatomy
Wojciech Pawlina (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)
Integration of Embryology, Histology & Cell Biology
Gary Schoenwolf (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Integration of Embryology & Molecular Biology


Monday, April 7 ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 8

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY I
Chair: Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 8

PREPARING FUTURE ANATOMY FACULTY & ADVANCING EDUCATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP
Co-sponsored by Anatomical Sciences Education
Chair: Valerie Dean O'Loughlin (Indiana Univ.)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 8

As the pool of experienced anatomy educators continues to decline, and current anatomy Ph.D. programs place less of an emphasis on pedagogical development, universities are becoming increasingly concerned about the future generation of anatomy instructors. In addition, anatomy educators are expected not only to teach, but to pursue pedagogical research in the areas of anatomy and medical education. In this symposium, four anatomy faculty will address the issues of preparing future anatomy faculty and how all faculty can advance educational scholarship. Drs. Jim Brokaw and Kurt Albertine will discuss their progress in implementing anatomy teacher-scholar programs at their respective institutions. Dr. Terrell will define educational scholarship and explore how it is being advanced in the field of anatomy. Finally, Dr. O'Loughlin will present data from her Pedagogical Methods in Health Sciences class that shows how this class has helped prepare these students to become reflective and scholarly future faculty.

James Brokaw (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Development of an Education Track in Anatomy Ph.D. at Indiana University School of Medicine
Valerie Dean O'Loughlin (Indiana Univ.)
Can We Encourage our Graduate Students to Develop a More Scholarly Approach Toward Classroom Teaching?
Mark Terrell (Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine)
A Faculty Learning Community Model for Preparing Future Anatomy Educators
Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Building an Anatomy Teacher-Scholar Program at the University of Utah School of Medicine


Tuesday, April 8TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY II
Chairs:Kirk M. McHugh (Columbus Children's Research Institute & The Ohio State Univ.) & Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
8:00-10:00 PM, Room 8

REFRESHER COURSE: BIOLOGY OF THE LYMPH NODE—FOUR PERSPECTIVES
Co-sponsored with AAI & ASIP
Chairs: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) & Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 8

Lymph nodes serve as crossroads of body fluid flow as well as checkpoints for alerting the body to invasions. Moreover, they serve as organizing centers for responses when such invasions occur. They also represent important examples of how organ distribution and structure provide a basis for understanding normal and pathological function. By combining speakers on basic lymph node structure and function together with those on issues regarding their importance in clinical medicine, we hope to promote an integrated understanding of the significance of these organs in immune function and health.

David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) & Doug Paulsen (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Overview of the Lymphatic System/Cell & Tissue Biology of the Lymph Node
Linda M. Bradley (Univ. of California, San Diego School of Medicine)
Immunology of the Lymph Node
Noel Weidner (Univ. of California, San Diego School of Medicine)
Pathology of the Lymph Node
William Read (Univ. of California, San Diego School of Medicine)
Lymph Nodes & Cancer Treatment

TIPS & TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING CORE ANATOMY CONCEPTS
Supported by an educational grant from Elsevier, Inc.
Chair: Noelle A. Granger (Univ. of North Carolina)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 8

SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIA

Sunday, April 6
CRANIOFACIAL & SKIN DEVELOPMENT: THE KERATINOCYTE LINK
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7B

Regulatory Factor 6, TGFbeta3, p63 and 14-3-3 pathways are all involved in craniofacial and skin devel-opment. This multidisciplinary panel will highlight convergence of signaling pathways responsible for normal development of the lip and palate and epidermis with an emphasis on their common role in keratinocyte differentiation. Keratinocyte – the weakest or strongest link? Come listen and find out.

Yang Chai (Univ. of Southern California, School of Dentistry)
TGF-beta Signaling & Craniofacial Morphogenesis
Maranke Koster (Univ. of Colorado at Denver Health Sciences Center)
p63 Induces Key Target Genes Required for Epidermal Morphogenesis
Aziz Ghahary (Univ. of British Columbia)
Stratifin as a Mediator of Epithelial/Mesenchymal Cross Talking in Skin
Brian Schutte (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine)
Recent Insights into the Role of IRF6 in Craniofacial & Skin Development

DECIPHERING THE ACTIONS OF ANGIOGENESIS INHIBITORS: SURPRISES & NEW DIRECTIONS
Chair:Marion K. Gordon (EMSOP, Rutgers Univ.)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 10

Donald McDonald of UCSF will talk on how cellular angiogenesis inhibitors affect the cells of blood ves-sels in both tumors and normal organs. Luisa Ireula-Arispe of UCLA will address the role of VEGF signaling in developmental and pathological angiogenesis, considering whether pharmacological inhibition of the pathway may affect normal vasculature. Gabriele Bergers of UCSF will talk on vascular progenitor and modulatory cells in tumors, concentrating on bone marrow-derived monocytes and their function in tumor angiogenesis and invasion.

Donald McDonald (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Cellular Actions of Angiogenesis Inhibitors on Blood Vessels in Tumors & Normal Organs
Gabriele Bergers (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Vascular Progenitor & Modulatory Cells in Tumors
Randall Johnson (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Hypoxia and Inflammation: Relationship to Angiogenesis
Luisa Iruela-Arispe (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Signaling Pathways in Angiogenesis

Monday, April 7
NUCLEAR STEROID RECEPTOR ACTION IN THE BRAIN
Supported by an educational grant from the Loyola University Neuroscience Institute, Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Chair: Toni Pak (Loyola Univ.)
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7A

Nuclear steroid hormone receptors in the brain are anatomically poised to orchestrate a diverse array of peripheral and central signaling cascades to regulate complex social behaviors and physiological processes. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of nuclear steroid receptor signaling have shown that perturbations in central nuclear receptor gene expression and function can have profound consequences on neuronal survival, cognition and memory, reproductive function, and mood disorders to name just a few examples. This session will highlight recent discoveries in estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid receptor action in the brain and will emphasize their critical importance from early development through aging.

James Roberts (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center)
Mechanisms of Estrogen Receptor Neuroprotection in Dopamine Neurons
Roberta Diaz Brinton (Univ. of Southern California, School of Pharmacy)
Estrogen-Induced Neuron Survival Requires Coordinated Responses of Membrane & Nuclear Receptors
Andrea Gore (Univ. of Texas at Austin, School of Pharmacy)
Hormone Receptors in the Brain & Relevance to Reproductive Aging
Donald DeFranco (Univ. of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine)
Developmental Regulation of Glucocorticoid Receptor Processing in the Brain: Role of Specific E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

TISSUE ENGINEERING IN 3D: REBUILDING THE MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES
Chair: Qian Chen (Brown Univ.)
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 10

The symposium will focus on several key aspects of tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissues includ-ing bone, cartilage, muscle, and tendon. The central idea is to rebuild a functional tissue with anatomically shaped tissue constructs. These key aspects including the selection of biomimetic scaffolds to seed cells, how to replicate the 3D environment for cells to receive mechanical and chemical signals, integration of two tissues with different material and mechanical properties, and considerations of rebuilding anatomically shaped tissues that perform both structural and regulatory functions as an organ.

David Kaplan (Tufts Univ.)
Regenerating Osteochondral Tissues
Gerard Ateshian (Columbia Univ.)
Functional Tissue Engineering of Anatomically Shaped Cartilage Constructs
Qian Chen (Brown Univ.)
Mechanical & Chemical Regulation of Cells in a 3D Environment
Michael Hadjiargyrou (SUNY, Stony Brook)
Biomimetic Electrospun Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

NOVEL APPLICATIONS OF ANATOMICAL DATA: MOLECULES TO MAN
Chair: Charles D. Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
10:30 AM -12:30 PM, Room 7A

Anatomy is the premier integrative biological discipline. Gene regulatory networks and cell signaling pathways operate over a relatively narrow space/time scales. Anatomical data, however, encompass a nanometer to meter length scale, across the lifetime of an organism. In this Symposium four investigators harness state-of-the-art technologies to address and illuminate systems level anatomical problems that range from the sub-cellular to the human gait. The work exemplifies modern approaches to large-scale biological data analyses and modeling.

Fabian Pollo (Baylor Univ. Medical Center)
Real-Time Anatomical Visualization: Digitizing the Human Gait
Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Cell and Tissue Dynamics During Gastrulation
Rusty Lansford (California Institute of Technology)
Multimodal Imaging of Embryogenesis
Joel Stiles (Carnegie Melon Univ.)
Large-Scale Volume Data Analysis for Meso- & Macroscopic Physiological Modeling

HOW TO MAKE A LIMB: DEVELOPMENTAL PARADIGMS
Henry Gray/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Scientific Achievement Award Symposium
Chair: John F. Fallon (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7B

For more than 100 years the developing vertebrate limb has attracted the attention of anatomists. As we have moved from gross anatomical studies to molecular and genetic approaches, the intricacies of limb developmental mechanisms emerged; these served as paradigms for other organ systems. It is delightful that each time we think a complete understanding of limb development will soon be reached, new, more interesting and challenging vista emerges. This symposium gives us the opportunity to understand the very latest insights about limb developmental mechanisms.

Cliff Tabin (Harvard Medical School)
Patterning the Vertebrate Limb
Gail Martin (UCSF Medical School)
Function of Sprouty Genes in Limb Development
Marie Kmita (Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal)
Role of HOX Genes in Early & Late Limb Development
Lee Niswander (Univ. of Colorado)
Cell Behaviors & Morphogenesis in Early & Late Limb Development

AN EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE ON HUMAN ANATOMY
Co-sponsored by AAA's Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chair: Jason Organ (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7A

The disciplines of anatomy and physical anthropology have traditionally been closely linked: anatomists benefit from an understanding of the evolutionary history of our modern form, and physical anthropologists rely on anatomical principles to make informed evolutionary inferences about our closest relatives. This symposium highlights the research of early-career physical anthropologists who take a functional anatomical approach to understanding our evolutionary origins. Particular topics will include the evolution of human locomotion, energetics, biomechanics, and musculoskeletal form.

David Raichlen (Univ. of Arizona)
Are Two Legs Better than Four? Comparative Biomechanics & the Evolution of Human Walking & Running
K. Lindsay Eaves-Johnson (Univ. of Iowa)
Correlating Costal Curvature & Lung Volume in the Genus Homo: a Geometric Morphometric Approach
Caley Orr (Arizona State Univ.)
Locomotor Hand Postures & the Functional Anatomy of the Hominid Wrist
Qian Wang (Mercer Univ. School of Medicine)
Biomechanics of the Primate Craniofacial Skeleton & its Relevance to Human Evolution

NEURO-IMMUNE INTERACTIONS IN INJURY & DISEASE
Co-sponsored by the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Neurobiology Chairpersons
Chair: John Clancy, Jr. (Loyola Univ.)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 10

There have been numerous documentations that the immune and nervous systems "talk" to each other. However, the exact mechanism(s) for this dialogue have not been demonstrated. In this symposium, you will first learn that certain subsets of T lymphocytes are integral to this process as they play major roles in not only neurodestruction but also neuroprotection after injury. You will next learn that microglia are involved in not only antigen processing and presentation but also in the production of critical cytokines for an immune response within the nervous system. In the context of disease, you will learn that HIV-1 infected microglia or macrophages release cytokines, neurotoxins and chemokines that may help mediate pain hypersensitivity often severely manifested during systemic HIV-1 infection.

Virginia Sanders (Ohio State Univ.)
A Primer for Understanding Neuro-Immune Interactions
Kathryn Jones (Loyola Univ. School of Medicine)
CD4 T Cell-Mediated Neuroprotection: Relevance to ALS & Motoneuron Injury
Monica Carson (Univ. of California, Riverside)
Microglia & the CNS: Specific Regulation of Antoreactive T Cells
Fletcher White (Loyola Univ. School of Medicine)
Controlling Neuropathic Pain in HIV

Tuesday, April 8
CELL BEHAVIOR IN 3D
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
Chair:Gina Schatteman (Univ. of Iowa)
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7A

Over the past two decades new technologies have made it simpler to study cells in 3-dimensions both in vitro and in vivo. In general these studies have supported earlier work in 2-dimensions, but they have also shown the limitations of work in planar geometries. This symposium will highlight studies of cell behavior in 3-dimensions and how the inclusion of the third dimension is providing new and important biological insights into cell behavior and gene expression.

Shigeo Okabe (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ.)
Three-Dimensional Analyses of Neuron/Astrocyte Dynamics
Glen Prestwich (Univ. of Utah)
Three-Dimensional Studies in Drug Discovery
Jean Schwarzbauer (Princeton Univ.)
Studying the Matrix in Three Dimensions
Kazunori Nakajima (Keio Univ. School of Medicine)
Reelin & Neuronal Migration

INS & OUTS OF HEART DEVELOPMENT
Chair: Andy Wessels (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 10

Cardiac development involves a series of events starting with the generation of the precardiac mesoderm and ending with the formation of a 4-chambered heart in which the respective compartments are separated by septal structures and valves. Several mesenchymal cell populations, originating from different sources, including the endothelium, neural crest, and epicardium, play a role in valvuloseptal morphogenesis. The overall goal of this symposium is to discuss new insights into the origin, development, and fate of these subpopulations of cells.

Brian Black (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
Transcriptional Control of Heart Development
H. Scott Baldwin (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Role of Mesenchymal Heterogeneity in Construction of the OFT
José Pérez Pomares (Univ. of Málaga)
Embryonic Epicardial Cell Lineages: Making & Unmaking a Heart
Simon Conway (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Role of Periostin in Maturation of the Mesenchymal Outflow Tract Septum

MORPHOGEN GRADIENTS IN DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Chair: Todd D. Camenisch (Univ. of Arizona)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7A

Spatial gradients and activities of morphogens cue cells about their environment and how to respond in complex extracellular contexts. This is especially true for patterning in multicellular organisms and in acquiring information that transitions cells into a disease-state such as cancer. The mechanisms that produce and control these gradients and activities are not fully understood. The extracellular matrix contributes to the regulation and coordination of morphogen signals that promote commitment and differentiation of cellular phenotypes. This symposium highlights representative situations where matrix and spatio-temporal patterning influences cellular responses to specific signals. Such investigations are redefining cellular communications and expanding the appreciation for how cell fates are determined across a myriad of biological fields.

Joyce Schroeder (Univ. of Arizona)
Go or Grow: How HA Controls the EGF Receptor
Susie Nilsson (Monash Univ.)
Characterizing the Extracellular Components of the Hemopoietic Stem Cell Niche
Brad Davidson (Univ. of Arizona)
An Asymmetric Response to Fibroblast Growth Factor During Heart Development in Primitive Chordate
Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Cell & Tissue Motion Gradients during Embryogenesis

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES FOR CLINICAL TRANSLATION
Chair: George J. Christ (Wake Forest Univ.)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7B

This session will highlight the development of the innovative technologies, tools, methods, and devices that will further enable tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to increase the range of clinical applications. The ultimate goal of the session is to discuss, review and identify the next-generation transformational technologies and tools required for improved human health, benefit and performance from utilization/application of regenerative medicine/tissue engineering.

James Yoo (Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine)
Clinical Applications of Regenerative Medicine Technology
Johnny Huard (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Stem Cell Technology for Tissue Engineering/Regenerative Medicine
Harm Knot (DMT-USA, Inc.)
Development of Clinical & Experimental Bioreactors for Regenerative Medicine

Tim Bertram (Tengion, Inc.)
Regulation, Production & Distribution of Neo-organs

CROSSTALK & CO-DEPENDENCE BETWEEN NEURAL & VASCULAR SYSTEMS
Chair:Nicole Ward (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7A

This symposium will provide a forum for the presentation of research findings evaluating the tightly coordinated growth and interactions of the vascular and nervous systems throughout development and in vascular and neurological disease. Areas for discussion will include the involvement of neural growth factors and neural guidance molecules in vessel patterning and branching; ECM-vascular interactions during neuroblast migration in the adult brain; and the importance of the neurovascular niche during neurogenesis following ischemia.

Yosuke Mukoyama (National Institutes of Health)
Control of Blood Vessel Fate & Branching Pattern by Nerve-Derived Signals
Anne Eichmann (Collège de France)
Neuronal Molecules Involved in Blood Vessel Branching
Adam Puche (Univ. of Maryland)
Migrating the Adult Brain: Vascular & ECM Mediated?
S. Thomas Carmichael (Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)
A Neurovascular Niche for Neurogenesis after Stroke

CELLULAR & MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF REGENERATION
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Shannon J. Odelberg (Univ. of Utah)
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 10

Throughout the animal kingdom, there are numerous examples of organisms that possess remarkable regenerative abilities. Some vertebrates, such as salamanders and zebrafish, can regenerate complex structures including their appendages, heart ventricles, and spinal cords, while certain invertebrates, such as planarian, can regenerate an entirely new individual from a small piece of an animal. This session will cover recent advances in identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern regenerative processes in planarian, zebrafish, and salamanders.

Kyle Gurley (Univ. of Utah)
Systematic Analysis of Cell Signaling During Planarian Tissue Regeneration, Remodeling & Homeostasis
Kenneth Poss (Duke Univ. Medical Center)
Cellular & Molecular Mechanisms of Regeneration in Zebrafish
Hans-Georg Simon (Northwestern Univ., Children's Memorial Research Center)
Extracellular Control of Muscle Regeneration
Shannon Odelberg (Univ. of Utah)
An Investigation into the Cellular & Molecular Basis for Newt Spinal Cord Regeneration

Wednesday, April 9
ARTERIOGENESIS
Chair:Ola Awad (Univ.of Iowa)
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7B

Arteriogenesis is the compensatory growth of blood vessels following major arterial occlusions. This ses-sion will focus on the cellular and molecular basis of arteriogenesis with special emphasis on the unique aspects. Discussing the role of fluid shear stress as a pivotal trigger for arteriogenesis and how vascular integrity is maintained by VE-cadherin-p120-catenin complex. Another topic will be the signaling path-ways during coronary collateral growth with focus on the redox-sensitive signaling Akt, p38 MAPK pathway.


Michael Simons (Dartmouth Medical School)
Molecular Determinants of Arteriogenesis
Borja Fernández Corujo (Univ. of Málaga)
Collateral Artery Growth in Two Animal Models: Rabbit and Mouse Hind-limbs
Petra Rocic (Northeastern Ohio Univ. College of Medicine)
Mechanistic Basis for the Disparate Effects of Angiotensin II on Coronary Collateral Growth
Bill Chilian (Northeastern Ohio Univ. College of Medicine)
The Role of Ischemia and VEGF in the Growth of the Coronary Collateral Circulation

EARLY DECISIONS BY EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS:DIVERSIFICATION INTO & INTERACTION BETWEEN ENDODERMAL & MESODERMAL LINEAGES
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chairs:John W. Lough & Stephen A. Duncan (Medical College of Wisconsin)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7A

Experimentation on whole embryos during recent decades has led to widespread acceptance that development of the heart and liver is inter-dependently regulated via sequential interplay between progenitor cells that may begin as early as pre-gastrulation. Simply stated, definitive endoderm specifies precardiac mesoderm (reviewed in Dev. Dyn. 217:327; 2000), factors from which later specify liver differentiation in adjacent definitive endoderm (reviewed in Mech. Dev. 92:83; 2000). Because this sequence of interdependent specification is presumably recapitulated during the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro, a major theme of this symposium is to address whether molecular mechanisms shown to govern these processes in the embryo may be exploited to efficiently induce cardiomyogenic cells, or endoderm derivatives such as hepatocytes or pancreatic cells, from pluripotent ESCs for clinical application. Because this process begins with the decision of ESCs to either enter differentiative pathways or to perpetually self-renew as pluripotent cells, the role of epigenetic histone modifications in this process will be addressed by Dr. Michael Fritsch of the University of Wisconsin Medical School. This will be followed by Dr. Stephen Dalton of the University of Georgia who will describe how ESCs become specified into endoderm and mesoderm lineages, and how definitive liver, pancreatic and cardiomyogenic cells may emerge from them. Then, Dr. Yu Liu of Baylor College of Medicine will describe evidence for a factor in ESC-derived endoderm that regulates the expression of factors which, in turn, specify cardiomyogenic cells. Finally, Dr. Mark Mercola of the Burnham Institute for Medical Research will describe high-throughput technology designed to discover small molecules that regulate cardiomyocyte differentiation, cell cycle and physiology.

Michael Fritsch (Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School)
Role of Epigenetic Histone Modifications during Early Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation
Stephen Dalton (Univ. of Georgia)
Specification of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Pancreatic Lineages
Yu Liu (Baylor College of Medicine)
Endodermal Sox17-dependent Pathways & Cardiac Specification
Ming Zhao (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Making Embryonic Stem Cells Infarct-Avid

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HYBRID SYMPOSIA
ADVANCES IN IMAGING HARD TISSUES
Chair: Lynne A. Opperman (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Monday, April 7, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 10

This hybrid symposium has two featured speakers. Dr. Jerry Feng will talk about the coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, showing 1) the relationship between vessel pericytes and osteoprogenitor cells 2) osteoblast produced HIF-1a represents the rate-limiting component of osteogenic-angiogenic coupling and trabecular bone formation; and 3) osteocyte signaling feeds back to angiogenesis in bone. Dr. Paul Dechow will discuss how ultrasonic methods to determine 3D elastic properties coupled with µCT and conventional histology to quantify osteonal structure suggest that osteon orientation is correlated with cortical anisotropy. Supported by NIH/NIAMS AR051587 (JF), NSF BCS-0240865 and HOMINID-0725141 (PCD).

Paul Dechow (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
3D Imaging of Hard Tissue Vasculature
Jerry Feng (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
Imaging Cell Processes in Hard Tissues
Takeshi Matsumoto (Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Engineering Science)
Trabecular bone dynamics in mice subjected to unilateral sciatic neurectomy assessed by in vivo µCT using monochromatic synchrotron radiation
Carol Muehleman (Rush Univ. Medical Center)
Diffraction Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging
Kristen Brown (The Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine)
Locomotor effects on limb bone biomechanical properties in sciurids
Izabela Maciejewska (Baylor College of Dentistry
N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of dentin matrix protein 1(DMP1) are distributed differently in bone, dentin and cells.
Ryan Kerney (Dalhousie University)
Cellular Changes of the Skull During Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis

ENGINEERING THE MICROVASCULATURE
Chair: Laura E. Niklason (Yale Univ.)
Tuesday, April 8, 8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7B

The field of vascular regeneration has made tremendous progress in the past decade, resulting in viable replacements for both veins and arteries in humans. Progress in engineering of stable microvasculature has been somewhat slower, perhaps because of the delicate anatomic complexity of these structures. However, it is widely acknowledged that the most fundamental current barrier to large-scale tissue regen-eration is our limited ability to form perfusing microvessels. In this session, we will highlight recent advances in forming stable engineered microvasculature. Both in vitro and in vivo studies point to the critical importance of both extracellular matrix cues, and non-endothlial cell types, for the formation and stabilization of engineered capillaries.

George Davis (Univ. of Missouri)
Control of Microvascular Tube Assembly by Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions
Lucie Germain (Laval Univ.)
Capillary Reconstruction in Skin & Blood Vessels by Tissue Engineering
Dai Fukumura (Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School)
Creation of long-lasting blood vessels in vivo
Jessica Copeland (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Notch regulates multiple signaling pathways during extra-embryonic vascular differentiation of the yolk sac

NEURAL CREST CELLS: EVOLUTION, DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE

PLATFORM SESSIONS

AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.Sunday, April 6
NEUROBIOLOGY OF CNS DISEASES
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7A
Chair: Jessica A. Mong (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine)
Jia Yao (Univ. of Southern California)
James Jason Valdes (Florida International Univ.)
Kui Xu (Case Western Reserave Univ.)
Stefano Geuna (Univ. of Turin Medical School)
Nijee Sharma (Loyola Univ. Medical Center)
Kimberly Anne McDowell (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine)
Derek Wainwright (Loyola Univ. Chicago)
Lei Chen (Univ. of Kentucky)

Monday, April 7
HOW TO MAKE A LIMB: DEVELOPMENTAL PARADIGMS
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7B
Chair: Hans-Georg Simon (Northwestern Univ.)
Randall Dahn (The Univ. of Chicago)
Johannes Streicher (Medical Univ. of Vienna)
Gregg Duester (Burnham Institute for Medical Research)
Troy Camarata (Northwestern Univ.)
Marian Ros (Instituto de Biomedicinia y Biotecnologia de Cantabria)
Yasuhiko Kawakami (Salk Institute for Biological Studies)
Andrew Dudley (Northwestern Univ.)

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY I
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 8
Chair: Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Andrew Notebaert (Univ. of Iowa)
Brian MacPherson (Univ. of Kentucky)
Brenda Klement (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Christine Eckel (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ.)
Kenneth Jones (The Ohio State Univ.)
Carlos Andres Suarez-Quian (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center)
Todd Hoagland (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)

ANIMAL MODELS IN INFLAMMATION & CANCER
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7B
Chair: Baljit Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
Lisa Ann Miller (UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine)
Chandrashekhar Charavaryamath (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
Marie-Renee Blanchet (The Univ. of British Columbia)
Abdo Romanos Jurjus (American Univ. of Beirut)
Sung-Hyeok Hong (National Institutes of Health)
Mark Zielinski (Univ. of South Carolina)
Dan Duda (Massachusetts General Hospital)


Tuesday, April 8
TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY II
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 8
Chair: Kirk M. McHugh (Columbus Children's Research Institute & The Ohio State Univ.) & Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
M.A. Khan (Des Moines Univ.)
Jeffrey Kingsbury (Mohave College)
Lorinda Lynn (Univ. of Utah)
Ngan Nguyen (Univ. of Western Ontario)
Jennifer Boeckner (Univ. of Western Ontario)
Ashley Clausner (Univ. of Western Ontario)
Karen Pinder (Univ. of British Columbia)
Robert Trelease (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)

CARDIAC BIOLOGY
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 10
Chair: Eduard I. Dedkov (New York College of Osteopathic Medicine/NYIT)
Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Andre Luiz Pasqua Tavares (Univ. of Arizona)
Ondrej Nanka (Charles Univ. in Prague)
Troy Baudino (Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine)
Andrei Borisov (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
Moni Nader (Univ. of Ottawa Heart Institute)
Darlene Hunt (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Bart Westendorp (Univ. of Ottawa Heart Institute)

LYMPHANGIOGENESIS
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 7B
Chair: Melody Swartz (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne)
Timothy Padera (Massachusetts General Hospital)
Emily Wilson (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
Sharon Stranford (Mount Holyoke College)
Mariappan Muthuchamy (Texas A&M Health Science Center)
Melody Swartz (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne)

TIPS & TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING CORE ANATOMY CONCEPTS
2:30-4:30 PM, Room 8
Chair: Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine)
Sherry Downie (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
Gregory Smith (Saint Mary's College of California)
Lawrence Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Arthur Dalley (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
H. Wayne Lambert (Univ. of Louisville)
Virginia Lyons (Dartmouth Medical School)
Robert DePhillip (Ohio State Univ.)
Todd Olson (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine)

Wednesday, April 9
STEM CELLS IN TISSUE ENGINEERING
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 7A
Chair: Dale R. Abrahamson (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Deborah Hyink (Mount Sinai Schoold of Medicine)
Jay Vivian (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Maria Luisa Soledad Sequeira Lopez (Univ. of Virginia)
T. Rajendra Kumar (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Joseph Khoury (Histogenics)
Vipuil Kishore (Wayne State Univ.)
Amelie Lavoie (Laval Univ.)

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT
8:00-10:00 AM, Room 10
Supported by an educational grant from Gene Tools, LLC
Chair: Shelley Caltharp (Loma Linda Univ.)
Scott Lozanoff (Univ. of Hawaii)
Ken Cho (Univ. of California)
Andrew Bergemann (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Jaime Sabel (Univ. of Iowa)
Brian Mitchell (Salk Institute for Biological Studies)
Jongmin Nam (California Institute of Technology)
Paul Boutz (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
James Tomasek (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center)

VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 7B
Chair: Robert J. Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
Yan-Lin Guo (Univ. of Southern Mississippi)
Jamie Wikenheiser (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Wei Zheng (Univ. of Iowa)
James Tomasek (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center)
Petra Rocic (Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine)
Dorothee Weihrauch (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Nicholas Gale (Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.)
Ming-Wei Chao (Rutgers Univ.)

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POSTER SESSIONS
Sunday, April 6
STEM CELLS: PRENATAL
STEM CELLS: PERINATAL
STEM CELLS: POSTNATAL
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: CELL-SCAFFOLD INTERACTIONS
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: ORGAN AND TISSUE REGENERATION
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: URINARY SYSTEM REGENERATION
WOUND HEALING
IMAGING ANATOMY
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: DEVELOPMENT
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: ECM & CELLS
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: ANATOMY & MORPHOLOGY
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: DYNAMIC IMAGING
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: CELL SIGNALING
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: ANGIOGENESIS, LYMPHANGIOGENESIS, & VASCULOGENESIS

Monday, April 7
ANATOMY EDUCATION
ANATOMY EDUCATION: COMPUTER-ASSISTED LEARNING
ANATOMICAL FORM AND VARIATION
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: CRANIOFACIAL
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: POSTCRANIAL
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: AGING, DISEASE, GENETIC MODELS AND ENGINEERING
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS
Tuesday, April 8
NEUROBIOLOGY
NEUROBIOLOGY: ANATOMY AND MORPHOLOGY
NEUROBIOLOGY: SENSORY SYSTEMS
NEUROBIOLOGY: REPAIR AND REGENERATION
CELL BIOLOGY
CELL BIOLOGY: GENE REGULATION
CELL BIOLOGY: CONTRACTILITY/MUSCLE
CELL BIOLOGY: MEMBRANES, ORGANELLES, CILIA AND FLAGELLAE
CELL BIOLOGY: ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: CRANIOFACIAL
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: HIND LIMB DEVELOPMENT AND REGENERATION
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: REPRODUCTION

LATE-BREAKING POSTER TOPICS AAA Poster Sessions are organized based on submitted abstracts. Authors are required to be at their posters from 12:30 – 2:00 PM on the day they are scheduled.

Anatomy Education (100-AAA)
Bones, Cartilage & Teeth (101-AAA)
Cardiovascular Biology (102-AAA)
Cell Biology (103-AAA)
Extracellular Matrix (104-AAA)
Growth & Development (105-AAA)
Imaging & Technology (106-AAA)
Neurobiology (107-AAA)
Regenerative Medicine (108-AAA)
Stem Cells (109-AAA)

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