2009 Annual Meeting - New Orleans

April 18-22, 2009 - New Orleans, LA

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

John Gearhart, Ph.D.
James W. Effron University Professor
Director, Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Univ. of Pennsylvania

Regenerative Medicine: Learning to Instruct Our Own Cells

Monday, April 20, 5:00-6:00 PM, Room 217/218

Regenerative medicine, the restoration of tissues or cells lost to trauma, disease and wear, will encompass tissue and cell engineering, cell-based interventions, material sciences, artificial and biohybrid organs, and biosurgery. Stem cells are serving not only as a source of cells for therapies (and potential therapies) but also as a source of basic science knowledge that will be utilized in regenerative medicine strategies. To develop safe and effective therapies we must be able to provide instructions to cells to behave and function in a tissue-appropriate manner. These instructions can be provided by pre-conditioning cells, the local tissue environment or through the reprogramming of cells to specific phenotypes. The new platform of directly reprogramming cells through the introduction of sets of genes, small molecules, etc., as illustrated by induced pluripotential cells, is ideally suited for user innovation in that it combines large numbers of users and a technology that has a modular or open design. These design characteristics create a common workbench for user innovators to generate reagents that will be appropriate for regenerative medicine, including direct use in the patient. Also, studies on regeneration, per se, will provide another important source of basic science knowledge that will impact on regenerative medicine.


PLENARY SPEAKERS
Robert S. McCuskey, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine

The Hepatic Microvascular System in Health & Disease

Sunday, April 19, 8:00-9:00 AM, Room 217/218

The hepatic microvascular system includes portal venules and hepatic arterioles, the sinusoids, and central and hepatic venules. The sinusoids are unique exchange vessels lined by: (a) fenestrated endothelial cells (SEC) lacking a basal lamina that have endocytotic and immune functions; (b) phagocytic Kupffer cells (KC) that are sources of mediators for host defense as well as hepatic injury; and (c) stellate cells that are contractile pericytes containing fat droplets that store Vitamin A and produce collagen when activated. Stellate and SEC play a major role in regulating the diameters of sinusoids and the distribution of blood flow in individual sinusoids, lobules, or segments of lobules. The SEC are also a sensitive and early target for hepatic injury. The responses of the hepatic microcirculation to toxicants are of two basic types: (a) an inflammatory response involving paracrine activation of SEC by mediators released from adjacent KC following stimulation by toxicants leading to the upregulation of adhesion molecules and the subsequent adhesion of leukocytes to the SEC, as well as swelling of the SEC, both of which restrict sinusoidal blood flow; and (b) direct injury of the SEC resulting in loss of fenestrae, formation of gaps and penetration of the sinusoidal lining by blood cells. Subsequently, the sinusoid may collapse or disintegrate reducing blood flow.



Duane E. Haines, Ph.D.
Chairman & Professor, Department of Anatomy
Univ. of Mississippi Medical Center

The Changing Landscape of Anatomical Education: One Opinion on How We Might Increase the Value of Our Stock

Sunday, April 19, 9:00-10:00 AM, Room 217/218


Advances in medicine over the last 25 years have significantly improved the treatment of patients and, perhaps unwittingly, presented unique opportunities to the medical educator. While these advances were the product of medical exigency, they have given medical educators unique innovations to embrace and use to their own advantage. The real question is, are we really integrating clinical concepts, information, or content in our courses? MRI and CT are unique and powerful educational tools that function in parallel with clinical terminology. During the time period in which these methods have become commonplace, there have been repeated efforts to reduce or diminish course content in the anatomical sciences. Have we, as medical educators, allowed this decrease in emphasis to occur by our failure to embrace the very tools and concepts that show the absolute essential value of anatomy in medical education? There are several examples where MRI, CT, or clinical terminology can be used to significant advantage in the basic science setting. First, CT and MRI show anatomy in vivo; such images should be an integral, if not dominant, part of gross anatomy. Second, when teaching cross-sectional anatomy, "laterality" must be taken into account. A cross-section in an "anatomical" orientation that does not match a corresponding MRI or CT is intrinsically flawed. Third, brainstem "anatomy" should be taught to match the "anatomy" in MRI; otherwise clinical correlations are difficult to make and time consuming to explain. Fourth, there are numerous examples where a clinical term can be used to designate an anatomical structure within its proper context.

AAA STUDENT/POSTDOCTORAL PLATFORM SESSIONS

LANGMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD PRESENTATION
Chair: Kathleen Muldoon (Dartmouth Medical School)
Saturday, April 18, 3:30-5:00 PM, Room 211/212

Cara Alexander (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)
Classroom Clickers Provide Reliable Formative Feedback: Three Years Experience in Gross & Microscopic Anatomy Curriculum
Christopher Camp (Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic)
Comparative Efficacy of Group Versus Individual Feedback Regarding Medical Student Professionalism in Gross Anatomy
Yingheng Liu (Sanford Research - Univ. of South Dakota)
Thyroid Hormone Analogue 3,5-diiodothyropropionic acid (DITPA) Promotes Healthy Vasculature in the Adult Myocardium Independent of Thyroid Metabolic Effects
Xin Long (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Role of Adenosine A1 Receptors and P2Y2 Receptors and ERK1/2 Activation in Coronary Atherosclerosis and In-stent Stenosis
Rebecca Lufler (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)
Incorporating Radiology into Medical Gross Anatomy: A Study of its Efficacy in Learning Spatial Relationships
Jeffrey White (Louisiana State Univ. Health Sciences Center)
Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) and Foxc2 are Required for Podocyte Development in Xenopus

POSTDOCTORAL PLATFORM AWARD PRESENTATION
Chair: Lorinda Lynn (Univ. of Utah)
Saturday, April 18, 5:30-7:00 PM, Room 211/212

JoSette Broiles (Univ. of Oklahoma - Health Sciences Center)
Mechanoregulated Expression of Smooth Muscle alpha-actin in Myofibroblasts is Mediated by Actin Dynamics and Myocardin Elated Transcription Factor-A Localization
Gabrielle Curinga (Univ. of Kentucky)
Chase-ing Regeneration: Engineering Chondroitinase for Mammalian Expression
George Risinger, Jr. (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Science Center)
The Actin Cytoskeleton Regulates Matrix-Metalloproteinase-2 Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Response to Insulin-like Growth Factor
Jaime Sanchez (Univ. of South Florida)
Surgical Anatomy of the Male Pelvis: a 3D Model Based on the Visible Human Project®

AAA YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARDS SYMPOSIUM
Sunday, April 19, 5:00-7:00 PM, Room 217/218

R.R. Bensley Award Lecture in Cell Biology ">
Gregory Pazour, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
University of Massachusetts Medical School

New Roles for an Ancient Organelle: Ciliary Defects Cause Cystic Kidney Disease and Blindness

The discovery that the mutation in the Tg737orpk mouse model of polycystic kidney disease affected assembly of cilia in kidney tubules has fueled new interest in primary cilia. These organelles were first described in 1898 and over the next one hundred years, microscopists documented the presence of these organelles on nearly every cell type in vertebrate organisms. Prior to the work on the Tg737orpk mouse, the function of the primary cilium was controversial with many cell biologists believing them to be vestigial organelles with no function in the modern organism. The idea that primary cilia are vestigial has been soundly disproved as severe defects in primary cilia cause embryonic lethality and milder defects lead to a syndrome of phenotypes including cystic kidney disease, liver cysts and fibrosis, polydactyly, and defects of the mammary gland, heart, pancreas, brain and eye. It is now widely believed that these organelles are cellular antennae that monitor the extracellular environment and feed this information back to the cell to control many aspects of cell physiology including proliferation and differentiation. Recent evidence indicates that cilia are key players in hedgehog and Wnt signaling and so may integrate extracellular signals in the control of these and other signaling pathways.


C.J. Herrick Award Lecture in Neuroanatomy
Richard Anderson, Ph.D.
NHRMC RD Wright Fellow
University of Melbourne

Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

The formation of a functional enteric nervous system requires the coordination of a complex web of interactions, facilitating the migration, proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells within the gastrointestinal tract. During development, the enteric nervous system is derived from neural crest cells that emigrate from the post-otic hindbrain ("vagal" level) into and along the developing gut. In mice, vagal neural crest cells enter the developing foregut around E9.5 and migrate rostrocaudally in chains to colonise the entire length of the gut by E14.5. The migration of enteric neural crest cells into and along the gastrointestinal tract is a critical process. Failure of neural crest cells to colonize the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract results in a region of the gut that lacks a functional enteric nervous system. In humans, this condition is called Hirschsprung's disease. Our research is focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that influence enteric neural crest cell migration into and along the developing gut. We have shown that the migration of enteric neural crest cells is influenced by multiple factors, including: (i) factors that are secreted by the gut mesenchyme, which regulate the entry of neural crest cells into the gut and promote neural crest cell migration along the gut; and (ii) neural crest cell-cell interactions, as we have shown that cell-cell interactions are required for the chain migration of neural crest cells and that changes that altered the equilibrium of these interactions disrupt migration. Together, these studies highlight that enteric neural crest cell migration is a complex process, requiring the integration of multiple factors.


H.W. Mossman Award Lecture in Developmental Biology
Oliver Hobert, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Columbia University Medical Center

Molecular Mechanisms of Maintaining Nervous System Architecture

The complex and interconnected structure of a nervous system is largely determined by patterning events during embryonic development. A question that has received little attention in the past is whether the architecture of the nervous system is maintained simply by those factors that have initially patterned the nervous system or, alternatively, whether dedicated mechanisms exist that ensure the sustained integrity of the nervous system. My laboratory has addressed this question in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans whose nervous system architecture is exceptionally well-described on a single neuron level, is largely invariant from animal to animal and can be readily visualized at different developmental and post-developmental time points with the help of fluorescent markers. The nervous system largely develops during embryogenesis when most neurons are born, reach their final positions, establish connections with their targets, and are organized into ganglia and axonal fascicles. However, after hatching, the nervous system of larvae and adults faces a variety of challenges. During larval development, the size of the worm's body increases considerably, as do neuronal structures such as axons. Moreover, tissues underlying certain neuronal structures, such as the hypodermis, are remodeled during larval stages. In addition, the locomotory movements of the worm's entire body, the foraging movements of the head and the pumping movement of the pharynx, which neighbors all major head ganglia, conceivably exert significant pressure on neuronal structures. Conceptually, these sorts of challenges are faced by most nervous systems. Our microsurgical and genetic analysis in C. elegans has revealed that these challenges are met by the employment of dedicated maintenance mechanisms that keep neuronal structures intact. We have found a set of Immunoglobulin-domain containing proteins whose sole function appears to be to ensure the maintenance of positioning of axonal tracts and cell bodies in various regions of the nervous system. These proteins include the C.elegans homolog of the human disease gene L1, several secreted, small Ig domain proteins, a gigantic basement membrane protein, and, surprisingly, also the fibroblast growth factor receptor.


AAA Morphological Sciences Award Lecture
Matthew Allen, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Indiana University School of Medicine

Bisphosphonates and Bone: Understanding Biological Mechanisms using Morphological Techniques

Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the gold-standard pharmaceutical treatment for a number of metabolic bone diseases. Over the past several years, our laboratory has been working to understand the effects of BPs on various aspects of skeletal biology. Through a series of studies, using various animal models, we have established several important treatment effects of BPs including 1) the time-course of changes in microdamage accumulation that result from the bone remodeling suppression effects of BP; 2) the long-term effects of BP treatment on bone biomechanical properties; 3) the effects of BP-treatment on the non-mineral component of bone matrix; 4) the site-specific and BP-specific effects of BP-treatment on bone remodeling suppression; and 5) the role of BPs in a condition known as osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The goal of this talk will be to summarize these finding with an emphasis on the various morphological techniques used to help elucidate these tissue-level mechanisms of BP treatment.

Earl P. Benditt Award Lecture & Presentation
Saturday, April 18, 4:00-5:00 PM, Room 217/218
Sponsored by NAVBO
Aldons J. Lusis (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Cardiovascular Traits: From Genetics to Systems Biology

Judah Folkman Award in Vascular Biology: Presentation & Lecture
Sunday, April 19, 7:00-8:15 PM, Room 204/205
Sponsored by NAVBO
L. Iruela-Arispe (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
Searching for Angiogenesis Inhibitors While Learning About Blood Vessel Formation

Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry Plenary Lecture
Monday, April 20, 9:30 AM-10:30 AM, Room 204/205
Sponsored by HCS
Heinz-Ulrich Weier (UC-LBNL, Life Sciences Division)
From Molecules to Man - Molecular Cytogenetics in the 21st Century



  AAA PLENARY SYMPOSIA

THE HEPATIC SINUSOID & ITS UNIQUE ENDOTHELIUM
Chair: Robert McCuskey (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine)
Sunday, April 19, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 217/218

The hepatic sinusoid is the principal exchange vessel in the liver. Its endothelial lining has a unique structure and multiple functions that affect the liver and whole body function in health and disease. This session will explore what is known about many of the unique morphological and functional features of the hepatic sinusoidal endothelium, including scavenger function, cross-talk with other liver cells, immune functions, and aging.

Bard Smedsrod (Univ. of Tromso)
Scavenger Function of Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells
Laurie DeLeve (Univ. of Southern California)
Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Cross-Talk with Other Liver Cells
Percy Knolle (Univ. of Bonn)
Immune Functions of Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells
David LeCouteur (Univ. of Sydney)
Aging & the Hepatic Sinusoidal Endothelium

A PROACTIVE APPROACH TO ANATOMICAL EDUCATION IN A CONTEMPORARY MEDICAL CURRICULUM
Co-sponsored by ASGBI and Antomical Sciences Education
Chair: Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Sunday, April 19, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 211/212

Times are changing!! Curriculums are becoming integrated, courses are being shortened, and other factors may be influencing how you are going to teach. What's an anatomist to do? At this symposium, experienced educators will provide examples of how they have dealt with the brave new world of anatomy education.

Richard Drake (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
We Can't Teach Everything: Less Can Be More
Darrell Evans (Brighton & Sussex Medical School Anatomy)
Anatomy Leading the Competition: Variety is the Spice of Life
Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Dancing with the Devil? Teaming with Deans to Take Anatomy to a Bold New Future


STEM CELL MINI-MEETING

Monday, April 20
STEM CELL DYNAMICS & BIOENGINEERING: A SYNERGISTIC APPROACH
Co-sponsored by ASGBI
Chairs: Stefan Przborski (Univ. of Durham) & Di Lawrence-Watt (Brighton and Sussex Medical School)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 217/218

The four papers in this symposium will address the development of novel and innovative approaches to control the growth and differentiation of stem cells and their derivatives for use in basic research or therapeutic applications. Subject materials include the development of scaffold technology to enhance the growth and survival of cells in three dimensions and to direct the repopulation of tissues undergoing regeneration by the use of such cells. Key factors that can be used to attract and enhance cell survival and cell proliferation will also be addressed as will methods used to trace and monitor the survival of grafted cells used for tissue regeneration in the clinic.

Ketan Patel (Univ. of Reading)
Regulation of Satellite Cell Proliferation & Adult Skeletal Muscle Regeneration by the WNT Family of Signalling Molecules
Molly Shoichet (Univ. of Toronto)
Cell Guidance Strategies
Elizabeth James (Univ. of Brighton)
The Clinical Application of Cultured Cells: Are They Permanent or Just an Effective Temporary Dressing?
Stefan Przyborski (Univ. of Durham)
Enabling Technology that Allows the Routine Growth of Cultured Cells for Applications in Tissue Engineering

FUNCTION & IMMUNITY OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELL-DERIVED HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS
Co-sponsored by NAVBO
Chair: Nicholas Zavazava (Univ. of Iowa)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 217/218

This symposium will focus on the development, function, and immunity of ES cell-derived hematopoietic cells. Invited experts will address different aspects of the derivation process of hematopoietic progenitor cells. This session will highlight the possibilities of establishing embryonic stem cells as a new source of hematopoietic progenitors. We will discuss the new exciting area of induced pluripotent stem cells and challenges facing the field. Lastly, we will tackle the issue of immunity of ES-derived cells and their potential advantages over bone marrow cells.

Stuart Weisberg
Transcriptional Regulation of Self-Renewal in Embryonic & Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Hannes Klump (Transplantation Research Center)
From Birth to Adulthood in a Nutshell: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development In Vitro & HOXB4
Eva Szabo (McMaster Univ.)
Blood Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Nicholas Zavazava (Univ. of Iowa)
Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Hematopoietic Cells: Are they Immunocompetent?

STEM CELLS: PLASTICITY & HOMING IN THEIR HISTOLOGICAL CONTEXT
Co-sponsored by HCS
Chair: Heinz-Ulrich Weier (UC-LBNL) & Peter Quesenberry (Rhode Island Hospital)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 217/218

This session focuses on stem cell plasticity and homing. New information on the paradoxical dynamism of marrow stem cells as they proliferate and differentiate will be presented. The ability of stem cells to alter their phenotype toward lung cells via microvesicles will be discussed, as will the generation of functional humanized liver in sheep by bone marrow cells. A new area of stem cell biology, that of the role of reactive oxygen species in stem cell characterizations will be presented and the very small embryonic-like stem cell will be discussed. This session presents an overview of stem cell plasticity and homing.

Peter Quesenberry (Rhode Island Hospital)
The Paradoxical Dynamism of Marrow Stem Cells
Jason Aliotta (Rhode Island Hospital)
Stem Cells & the Lung
Esmail Zanjani (Univ. of Nevada, Reno)
Generation of Functional Humanized Liver in Sheep by Bone Marrow Cells
Mariusz Ratajczak (Univ. of Louisville)
Very Small Embryonic Like (VSEL) Stem Cells: Characterization, Biological Significance & Potential Applications

Tuesday, April 21

BIOLOGY & POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS OF STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS
Chair: Darwin Prockop (Texas A & M Health Sciences Center)
Supported by an educational grant from Texas A&M Health Science Center, Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 217/218

The session will introduce the audience to biological properties of adult stem/progenitor cells and the therapies for which they are now being used in patients. The session will address the current paradox in which stem/progenitor cells are found to produce functional improvements in animal models for diseases and in some patients without much evidence of long term engraftment of the cells. The speakers will discuss recent discoveries as to the cellular and mechanisms whereby the cells improve tissue repair in myocardial infarction, defects of the central nervous system and auto-immune diseases.

Darwin Prockop (Texas A & M Health Sciences Center)
Multiple Ways that Adult Stem/Projenitor Cells (MSCs) Respond to Cross-talk with Injured Tissues to Repair Them
Evan Snyder (Burnham Institute for Medical Research)
Homeostatic Pressure Exerted by Stem Cells in Degenerative or Injured CNS Environments
Jacques Galipeau (McGill University)
Novel Stem/Progenitor Cells
Yufang Shi (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Immunosuppression by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

FURTHER BIOLOGY & POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS OF STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS
Chair: Darwin Prockop (Texas A & M Health Sciences Center)
Supported by an educational grant from Texas A&M Health Science Center, College of Medicine and Scott & White Memorial Hospital
10:30 AM-1:00 PM, Room 217/218

The session will extend the discussion of the biological properties and potential therapeutic uses of adult stem/progenitor cells. The properties of similar cells from different tissues will be reviewed. More detailed descriptions will then follow on how the cells produce beneficial effects in animal models for lung diseases, heart diseases, and kidney diseases, including some recent trials in which the cells are being tested in patients with kidney diseases.

Donald Phinney (Tulane Univ. Health Sciences Center)
Functional Heterogeneity of MSC Populations Provides Clues to Their Broad Therapeutic Efficacy
Jeffrey Spees (Univ. of Vermont)
Subpopulation of Non-Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Human Bone Marrow
Paul Simmons (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center)
Exploring the Perivascular Niche of Mesenchymal Stem Cells
Christof Westenfelder (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Treatment of Acute Renal Failure with Allogenic Marrow Stromal Cells: Short- & Long- Term Effects in Experimental Models
David Brynmor Thomas (Bute Medical School)
The Construction, Analysis & Legacy of the Radiation Chimaera

EDUCATION & TEACHING TRACK Saturday, April 18
 

WORKSHOP: USING FRESH TISSUE TO TEACH ANATOMY
Co-sponsored by Antomical Sciences Education
Supported by an educational grant from The American Association of Clinical Anatomists
Chair: Noelle Granger (Univ. of North Carolina)
10:00 AM-12:00 PM, Room 211/212

In recent years, the use of fresh tissue for the teaching of anatomy has become increasingly popular because of the benefits of learning anatomy from unembalmed cadavers, tissue, and organs and because schools are willing to devote more resources to this effort. There are a number of issues that any anatomy program wishing to use fresh or lightly embalmed tissue will have to consider: procurement, preservation, storage, and disposal, plus how to prevent contamination, how to separate education from sales and infomercial applications in industry-supported events, and how to charge and bill for the use of such tissue.

Robert Acland (Univ. of Louisville)
The University of Louisville Fresh Tissue Dissection Laboratory: 25 Years' Experience with Unembalmed & Minimally Embalmed Human Tissue
Terry Regnier (College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic)
Utilization of Fresh Tissue in the Procedural Skills Laboratory at Mayo Clinic
James Johnson (Wake Forest Univ.)
An Anatomical Resource Clinical Training Center Using Cadavers as Simulated Patients: Utility, Management & Best Practices
Richard Whitworth (LSU Medical Center Dept. of Anatomy)
At LSU Health Sciences Center, Fresh is Best!

MASTER CLASS: THE LOWER RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
12:30 PM-3:00 PM, Room 211/212

For most of us, breathing is effortless and something we usually take for granted. But for those who experience breathlessness as a result of acute or chronic respiratory disease, getting enough air into the lungs becomes a daunting reality because healthy cells depend on adequate exchange of vital gases. The components of the lower respiratory system, the larynx, the trachea, and the lungs are important links in the pathway mediating gas exchange. Coordinated function of over 20 cell types found within the walls of the lower respiratory passages provides an environment for effective exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. In addition, these organs contribute to a variety of functions such as air conditioning, vocalization, acid-base balance, and blood pressure regulation.

John Morris (Oxford Univ.)
Teaching the Functional Anatomy of the Respiratory Tract to Medical Students
Michael Benjamin (Cardiff Univ.)
Teaching the Microscopic Anatomy of the Respiratory System to Medical Students
Tim LeCras (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)
Pathogenesis of Lung Remodeling in the Developing & Adult Lung: Role for the EGF Receptor
Alan Jobe (Cincinnati Children's Hospital)
Clinical Diffuse Lung Injury & Remodeling

Sunday, April 19

A PROACTIVE APPROACH TO ANATOMICAL EDUCATION IN A CONTEMPORARY MEDICAL CURRICULUM USE OF CINEMA IN THE CLASSROOM
Chair: R. Ranney Mize (LSU Health Science Center)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 211/212

This symposium will illustrate the use of Hollywood movies to instruct students, faculty, and the general public about a variety of diseases and issues regarding scientific ethics. A presentation on the NIH Science in the Cinema series will describe this educational summer film festival designed to better educate the public about science and illness, where a guest expert discusses the implications of the films shown. Other speakers will describe the use of film to demonstrate effective teaching and interviewing techniques and how films are used to teach issues about scientific ethics of interest to graduate students and research scientists. The session will conclude with a presentation on the use of movies to demonstrate brain diseases to medical and allied health students. Each speaker will use short clips from several movies to illustrate how they are incorporated into their programs and how film drama effectively conveys the impact of specific diseases upon the patient, family, and society.

Bruce Fuchs (NIH Office of Science Education)
NIH & Science in the Cinema
Michael Zigmond (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine)
How to Use Cinema to Teach Teaching
Beth Fischer (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
The Use of Commercial Films to Teach Ethics
R. Ranney Mize (LSU Health Science Center)
Cinema & Medical Neuroscience

Monday, April 20

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 211/212

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY I
Chair: Carol Nichols (Medical College of Georgia)
10:30 AM -12:30 PM, Room 211/212

Rebecca Lufler (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)
Samuel Marquez (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
Lawrence Rizzolo (Yale Univ.)
Patrick John Gannon (Touro Univ. College of Medicine)
Geoffrey Guttmann (The Commonwealth Medical College) & Cristian Stefan (Touro University College of Medicine)
Diana Rhodes (A.T. Still Univ. of Health Sciences)
Gabrielle Finn (Durham Univ.)
Lawrence Wineski (Morehouse School of Medicine)

ALL ABOUT MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: A PARADIGM FOR INTEGRATED COURSE DELIVERY
Chair: Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 211/212

This session presents an innovative online clinical case format for problem-based learning focused on multidisciplinary basic science instruction within a clinical context; a myocardial infarction case demonstrates the self-directed tutorial design. The session also covers content related to cardiac function, including cellular and molecular developmental perspectives, clinical aspects of MI, and stem cell treatment for MI. The tutorial format requires students to view videos of patient/physician history taking and physical examination to learn patient data collection and observe professional patient/physician interactions. Additionally, students are guided through questions that emphasize utilization of basic science information in patient assessment and diagnosis.

Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Together at First: Integrated Delivery of Basic & Clinical Sciences
Kersti Linask (Univ. of South Florida)
Cellular & Molecular Perspectives of Cardiac Development
David Addley (Cardiology Medical Associates)
Myocardial Infarction: How Times Have Changed
Gary Lyons (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Stem Cell-based Therapies for Treating Myocardial Infarction

Tuesday, April 21

TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY II
Chair: Jim Brokaw (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
8:00 AM -10:00 AM, Room 211/212

Yang Ding (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Valerie Dean O'Loughlin (Indiana Univ.)
Robin Marie Hopkins (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Michael Midgley (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Harold Yim (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Aimee Lynn Sergovich (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Christina Lew (The Univ. of Western Ontario)
Jiri Brabec (Charles Univ.)

REFRESHER COURSE: THE LIMBIC SYSTEM
Chair: Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 211/212

The limbic system is the foundation for discussion of higher order cognitive functions such as motivation, learning and memory, emotion, and homeostasis. Due to the extensive interconnections and structures involved in limbic system function, teaching this topic can be an overwhelming undertaking. The speakers in this symposium will give a general overview of limbic system structures and functions, provide tips and techniques on how to teach this complex topic, and present clinical and research correlates to aid in student understanding of this multifaceted system.

James Walker (Purdue Univ. Department of Basic Medical Sciences)
Overview of Limbic System Anatomy & Organization
James Culberson (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine)
Evolution of Teaching the Limbic System
J. Richard Greene (University of College Cork-Ireland)
Modeling the Nuclei & Pathways of the Limbic System Using the BrainTower Functional Neuroanatomy System
Jayaraman Rao (Ochsner Medical Center)
Clinical Correlations to Limbic System Structure & Function

LIFE SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY: MAKING THE SCIENCE WE TEACH REFLECT THE SCIENCE WE PRACTICE
EB-sponsored Symposium
Chair: Dee Silverthorn (Univ. of Texas) & Lynelle Golden (Bastyr Univ.)
12:30 PM-2:30 PM, Room 350/351

The goal of this symposium is to provide an opportunity for research scientists and educators from all FASEB member societies to come together and discuss how life science education can better reflect the science we practice. As biology research takes more of a systems and conceptual approach, it is important for life science educators to develop, evaluate, and implement new strategies to enhance integrative learning both within and across sub-disciplines. Collaboration across sub-disciplines will facilitate the process of change and help provide broad evidence for effective innovations in education. It is also important that we increase communication between life scientists and cognitive scientists because an understanding of how people learn is essential for the appropriate design and evaluation of new teaching strategies and curriculum. This symposium is a forum for sharing our best ideas on how to improve education and an opportunity to learn about recent research in cognitive science that may help guide changes in life sciences education. Following a summary of some of the latest advances in our understanding of how people learn, a scientist-educator will talk about a successful new interdisciplinary science education initiative, and representatives from NSF, HHMI, and NIH will comment briefly on funding initiatives to support the development of new curriculum and teaching strategies. The session will end with a panel discussion and questions.

Frank Keil (Yale Univ.)
Talk Title TBD
Katherine Semsar (Univ. of Colorado)
Bringing Bench Scientists on Board: The CU Science Education Initiative
Peter Bruns (HHMI)
Bio 2010 is Almost Here: Are We Responding?
Jim Collins (NSF)
Biology in the 21st Century: The Life Sciences in Transition
Clifton A. Poodry (NIGMS/NIH)
A Program to Develop the Next Generation of Teacher Scholars

INTEGRATING HISTOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM
Chair: Robert Spears (Baylor College of Dentistry)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 211/212

Paul Heidger (Univ. of Iowa Carver College of Medicine)
Joseph Mazurkiewicz (Albany Medical College)
Robert Klein (Univ. of Kansas)
Cathleen Pettepher (Vanderbilt School of Medicine)
Robert Spears (Texas A&M Health Science Center)

SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIA

Saturday, April 18BIOPHYSICAL REGULATION AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF VASCULAR CELL BEHAVIOR
Sponsored by NAVBO; co-sponsored by AAA
Chair: Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Saturday, April 18, 8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 217/218

Vascular tissue assembly occurs across wide time-scales and length-scales, with tissue motion and hemodynamics strongly influencing blood vessel pattern formation. Recent experimental biophysical and mechanical data can be used to construct biologically faithful models of vascular morphogenesis. The goal is to integrate vascular bio-complexity by linking sub-cellular, cellular, and tissue level mechanisms. This approach, it is hoped, will eventually lead to dynamic, predictive, computer simulations of tissue vascularization; and the testing of therapeutic agents, in silico.

Charles Little (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Biophysical Studies of Vascular Pattern Formation
Mary Dickinson (Baylor College of Medicine)
Contributions of Blood Flow to Cardiovascular Development
A. Wayne Orr (LSU Health Science Center)
Effects of Mechanical Forces on Vasculature
Amy Bauer (Los Alamos National Lab)
A Network Model of Endothelial Cell Receptor Crosstalk during Tumor Angiogenesis

IN VIVO IMAGING OF DEVELOPMENT: CELL COMMUNICATION DURING MIGRATION
Chairs: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research) & Jay Unruh (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Supported by an educational grant from Carl Zeiss MicroImaging, Inc.
1:00 PM-3:00 PM, Room 214

Advances in optical imaging technology are offering unique subcellular insights that now permit us to address how cell communication influences migration in vivo. As such, the speakers will present unique strategies for understanding cell migration and cell communication in vivo. Featured topics will include: bioprobe imaging of neuronal Rho GTPase signaling, cell automaton modeling of cell patterning, image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) of protein interactions and transport in migration, and molecular analysis of in vivo migratory factors.

Akira Chiba (Univ. of Miami)
Bioprobe-assisted In Vivo Dissection of Molecular Signaling by Rho GTPases in Developing Neurons
Andreas Deutsch (Technische Universität Dresden)
Cellular Automaton Modeling of Biological Pattern Formation
Paul Wiseman (McGill Univ.)
Mapping Protein: Protein Interactions & Transport in Migrating Cells Using Image Correlation Microscopy in Space & Time
Denise Montell (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Movies, Models & More: Finding the Molecules that Make Cells Move

VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION & DEVOLOPMENT
Chair: Richard Behringer (M.D. Anderson Cancer Center)
3:30 PM-5:30 PM, Room 214

What are the developmental and genetic mechanisms that lead to the genesis of morphological and physiological diversity between species? This symposium focuses on the use of innovative vertebrate model organisms, including stickleback fish, "Darwin's" finches, bats, and jerboas to address this question. The speakers utilize modern molecular embryological and genetic approaches to investigate the origins of unique traits, including skeleton modifications, beak morphology, limb elongation, and digit reduction. In addition, each speaker combines field studies with bench experimentation, providing an exciting approach for the study of evolution and development.

Michael Shapiro (Univ. of Utah)
Parallel Evolution in Stickleback Fish
Arkhat Abzhanov (Harvard Univ.)
Pecking at the Origin of Vertebrate Diversity
Chris Cretekos (Idaho State Univ.)
Comparative Limb Morphogenesis in Mice & Bats
Marie Manceau (Harvard Univ.)
Evolution & Development of Mammalian Pigmentation Patterns

Sunday, April 19

THE HEPATIC SINUSOID & ITS UNIQUE ENDOTHELIUM
NEW PERSPECTIVES ON IMAGING OLD ANATOMY
Co-sponsored by AAA's Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chairs: Valerie DeLeon (Johns Hopkins Medical School) & Chandrashekhar Charavaryamath (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 217/218

Understanding anatomy is fundamental to a broad range of scientific endeavor and requires that we be able to visualize structures of interest. Innovations in imaging techniques allow us to study anatomy in new ways and give us the tools to ask new questions. This symposium brings together young anatomists who are using cutting-edge imaging technologies to study respiratory function, cranial development, brain function, and neural connectivity. Our goal is to stimulate interest in these techniques and improve understanding of the research made possible by anatomical imaging. Goals for our participants: Spend some extra time explaining the method; what NEW QUESTIONS are you able to ask by using this method? How can other people take advantage of this method?

Jonathan Wisco (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)
Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to Study Neuroanatomical Structures
Kevin Bickart (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging & the Neurobiology of Belief
Valerie DeLeon (Johns Hopkins Medical School)
Visualization of Skull in Prenatal Mice with Syndromic Synostosis
Baljit Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
Recent Advances in Imaging of the Lung

NANOTECHNOLOGY & NANOBIOLOGY
Co-sponsored by NAVBO
Chair: Rocky Tuan (NIAMS/NIH)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 214

Nanotechnology encompasses an increasing number of activities based on the ability to produce, measure, observe, and control matter at the scale of nanometers. The ability to control matter at the nanometer scale is leading to technological advances in many scientific research areas, in particular biomedicine. These advances take advantage of the fact that at the nanoscale, materials have different properties than in macroscopic or bulk form. However, the novel behavior of nanomaterials may also pose risks to human health and environment. Elucidating the fundamental biological processes that are influenced by nanomaterials is critical to harnessing the potential of nanotechnology. In addition, nanoscience and nanobiology aim to understand the properties and structure of complex assemblies of biomolecules, and to transfer this knowledge to rational nanotechnology designs. This symposium will address these emerging research areas by bringing together speakers who are established experts in nanotechnology and nanobiology. Special emphasis will be on interdisciplinary approaches that combine engineering, physical and life sciences, and computational technologies to characterize, produce, and apply nanoscale matters for biomedicine.

Warren Chan (Univ. of Toronto)
Probing the Interactions of Nanoparticles with Biological Systems
Linda Griffith (MIT)
Integration of Nanoscale and Macroscale Cues in Bone Tissue Engineering
Samuel Stupp (Northwestern Univ.)
Self-Assembling Nanomaterials for Regenerative Medicine
Rocky Tuan (NIAMS/NIH)
Adult Stem Cells & Nanomaterials for Skeletal Tissue Engineering & Regeneration

TISSUE FIXATION FOR MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND MOLECULAR PROFILING
Sponsored by HCS
Chairs: Denis Baskin (VA Puget Sound Medical Center and Univ. of Washington) & Stephen Carmichael (Emeritus, Anatomy, Mayo Clinic)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 204/205

This session will help to understand basic principles and applications of tissue fixation, archiving, and retrieval for research in biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, pathology, and other disciplines. Presentations cover formalin and non-formalin fixation techniques, extraction of small amounts of tissues, as well as antigen retrieval for immunocytochemical studies. Both academic and industry scientists will benefit from this symposium.

Frederico Monzon (Molecular Diagnostics)
Unlocking the Archives: Genomic Analysis of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue
Wei-Sing Chu (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology)
Ultrasound-mediated Tissue Specimen Preparation & On-slide Molecule Extraction from Fixed Tissue Samples
Steven Bogen (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)
Formalin Fixation & Antigen Retrieval: Translating Insights To Clinical Innovation
Scott Jewell (Ohio State Univ.)
Non-formalin Tissue Fixation for Biochemical & Molecular Analysis

BLOOD VESSEL CLUB: GENETIC APPROACHES TO VASCULAR DISEASE
Co-sponsored by ASIP & NAVBO
Chairs: Douglas Marchuk (Duke Univ.) & Luisa Iruela-Arispe (Univ. of California, Los Angeles)
3:00 PM-5:00 PM, Room 220

This year, the Blood Vessel Club will focus on inherited diseases of the vasculature, and how these diseases have shed new light on vascular morphogenesis. Certain Mendelian phenotypes show aberrant branching and/or cross-sectional anatomy of the vessels, indicating strict genetic control of these morphological processes. The genes underlying these phenotypes have shed new light on the biochemical pathways that regulate vascular morphogenesis. Invited talks will be supplemented with short talks chosen from the submitted "blitzes".

Douglas Marchuk (Duke Univ.)
Molecular Genetic Mechanisms of Vascular Malformation
Dean Y. Li (Univ. of Utah)
Vascular Stability & Malformations

Monday, April 20

FGF SIGNALING IN DEVELOPMENT, DISEASE & REPAIR
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Suzanne Mansour (Univ. of Utah)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 214

Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling plays key roles in development and homeostasis. Inappropriate activation of FGF signaling leads to some of the most common congenital syndromes and is also linked to common cancers. Recently, it has become apparent that FGF signaling is key to the regenerative capacity of zebrafish hearts and fins. This symposium brings together a group of dynamic young scientists who collectively will cover their most recent findings in inner ear, limb, and retinal gland development and fin and heart regeneration, illustrating genetic methods for dissecting the developmental and regenerative deployment of FGF signals, and illuminating the use of animal models for mimicking human congenital anomalies.

Suzanne Mansour (Univ. of Utah Human Genetics)
FGF Signaling in Ear Development
Xin Sun (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madsion)
The Role of FGFs in Promoting & Termination Limb Bud Outgrowth
Xin Zhang (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Shp2 Dependent FGF Signaling in Retinal Development
Mohammad Hajihosseini (Univ. of East Anglia)
FGF Signaling in the Development and Pathogenesis of Craniofacial Sutures

MOLECULAR CYTOGENETICS IN PREIMPLANTATION/PERINATAL GENETIC ANALYSIS & CANCER RESEARCH
Sponsored by HCS
Chairs: Heinz-Ulrich Weier (UC-LBNL, Life Sciences Division) & Thomas Liehr (Friedrich-Schiller Univ.)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 204/205

The Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry (JHC) Plenary Lecture, From Molecules to Men – Molecular Cytogenetics in the 21st Century, will set the stage for this session. The symposium's presenters from academia and industry will cover a wide range of recent technical developments in cytogenetics and their translation into clinical diagnostics. Beginning with the molecular investigation of chromosome structure and the detection and accurate characterization of marker chromosomes, presentations in this symposium will focus on two major applications of molecular cytogenetics in pre-implantation/pre-natal diagnostics in the clinic: array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and routine single cells analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

Stuart Schwartz (Univ. of Chicago)
Molecular Cytogenetic Delineation of Chromosome Structure & Complexity
Thomas Liehr (Friedrich-Schiller Univ.)
Multi-color FISH Assays for Characterization of Marker Chromosomes & Epigenetic Changes
Sau Wei Cheung (Baylor College of Medicine)
Clinical Application of aCGH for Prenatal Diagnosis: Experience with >350 Cases
Jingly Weier (Reprogenetics, LLC)
Single Cell Cytogenetics

MULTISENSORY INTEGRATION
Co-sponsored by the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Neurobiology Chairpersons
Chair: Barry Stein (Wake Forest Univ.)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 214

The brain not only has the ability to use information from each of its sensory modalities independently, but can integrate information from multiple senses to use them synergistically. This latter ability, called multisensory integration can be seen at the single neuron level, and at the level of overt behavior and perception. This symposium will examine this capacity from multiple perspectives. Topics covered include how individual neurons in the midbrain superior colliculus integrate their cross-modal inputs, as well as the behavioral implications of this capacity; the algorithms and presumptive mechanisms used by SC neurons to synthesize their multiple sensory inputs and how these observations can be used to predict the neural product produced by two different sensory cues; how multisensory integration alters human perception; and how multisensory integration is utilized in communication. Of specific interest is the integration of faces and voices.

Barry Stein (Wake Forest Univ.)
Multisensory Integration: Insights from Single Neurons in the Midbrain & Cortex
Terrence Stanford (Wake Forest Univ.)
Differences Between Multisensory & Unisensory Integration
Ladan Shams (UCLA)
Crossmodal Interactions in Perception & Learning
Asif Ghazanfar (Princeton Univ.)
The Evolution of Speech-Reading

Tuesday, April 21

INTERSECTION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY & NANOMEDICINE
Chair: Rutledge Ellis-Behnke (Univ. of Hong Kong)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 214

This session explores the impact of nanotechnology on anatomy, pathology, and medicine; how it leads to a fundamental change of our perceptions of disease, detection, and treatment. The presentations highlight four examples of the key areas of development in cancer detection and treatment, nano-delivery of therapeutics, toxicity, and CNS regeneration.

Don Tomalia (The National Dendrimer & Nanotechnology Center, Central Michigan Univ.)
Dendrimer-Based Nanomedicine: Pharma Delivery, MRI Imaging/Targeted/Polyvalent Therapies
Esther Chang (Georgetown Univ.)
Materializing the Potential of Molecular Medicine via a Tumor-Targeting Nanodelivery Platform
Michael Heller (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Directed Self-Assembly Fabrication of BioChemsensor Devices from Nanoparticles
Kuan Wang (National Institutes of Health)
The Role of Nanomechanics in Signal Transduction

ELASTIC FIBER MOLECULES IN GROWTH FACTOR SIGNALING
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
Chair: Richard Pierce (Washington Univ. School of Medicine)
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 214

Elastic fibers are important for the mechanical properties of many vertebrate tissues, and are comprised of polymerized elastin deposited on a network of microfibrils, whose components have important roles in signaling as well as in assembly of the extracellular matrix. In this session, we will explore how different components of microfibrils modulate growth factor and protease activities and impact development, growth, and the responses to injury.

W. Scott Argraves (Univ. of South Carolina)
Fibulins & Angiogenesis
Hiromi Yanagisawa (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)
Integrin Binding to Fibulin 5 Regulates Protease Activities
Lynn Sakai (Shriners Hospital for Children)
Extracellular Regulation of Growth Factor Signalling by Fibrillin Microfibrils
Richard Pierce (Washington Univ. School of Medicine)
MAGP- Modifier of Fibrillin-Mediated Growth Factor Signalling

Wednesday, April 22

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM & AGING
Supported by an educational grant from The Ellison Medical Foundation
Co-sponsored by NAVBO
Chair: Eduard Dedkov (New York College of Osteopathic Medicine)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 217/218

This symposium will provide a forum for the presentation of research findings evaluating cardiac and vascular aging at the genetic, molecular, cellular, and physiological levels. It will highlight intimate links between the age-associated alterations in the cardiovascular system and the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases with advancing age. Areas for discussion will include: the insight into senescent changes in cardiac stem cells and the mechanisms that are essential to the maintenance of their regenerative function; the use of the Drosophila heart as a model to dissect genetic mechanisms of cardiac aging; and the elucidation of cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie age-associated changes in arterial structure and function to unravel the impact of the "aging process" per se on development of arterial diseases.

Hui-Ying Lim (Burnham Institute for Medical Research)
Genetic Modulation of Cardiac Aging
Douglas Seals (Univ. of Colorado)
Aging & Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction
Marcello Rota (Harvard Medical School)
Aging of Cardiac Stem Cells
Mingyi Wang (National Institute on Aging)
Central Arterial Aging: Humans to Molecules

JUNK ANATOMY: THE STORY BEHIND "USELESS" PARTS
Chairs: Timothy Smith (Slippery Rock Univ.) & Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 211/212

Reduced anatomical structures (vestiges and atavisms) share a common significance: they demonstrate the persistence of genes even in the absence of demonstrable functionality. Regarded as identifiable traces of organismal change, vestigial structures have played a prominent role in the development of evolutionary theory. Human structures such as the vermiform appendix, permanent third molar, vomeronasal organ, and ear muscles are examples—all regarded as now degenerate versions of once fully functional anatomy. This symposium revisits the question: why do organisms retain structures of limited or useless function?

Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Homo Schlubicus: The End Product of 6 Million Years of Useless Parts Tagging Along
Samuel Marquez (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
The Meaning of Emptiness: Sinuses & Sacs from Land to Sea
Heather Smith (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix)
A Never-ending Pain in the ...: That Annoying Appendix
Thomas Park (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)
Blind & Naked, But Oh So Cool: The Subterranean World of the Naked Mole Rat

SLEEP & METABOLISM: IT'S MORE THAN JUST WHAT YOU EAT
Chairs: Gloria Hoffman (Morgan State Univ.) & Jessica Mong (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine)
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 214

Recent reports link sleep problems with increased food intake, obesity, and initiation of the metabolic syndrome associated with Type 2 diabetes. But how problems with sleep can alter metabolism is largely unknown. Do all types of sleep problems trigger the same series of events? What role does stress play as a factor in morbidity after sleep deprivation/restriction? Is the increased obesity required for alterations in glucose metabolism? What are the pathways that link sleep to metabolism? Answering these questions provides the focus of our session, integrating basic and clinical studies.

Gloria Hoffman (Morgan State Univ.)
Chronic Sleep Deprivation Induces Alterations in Both Feeding & Arousal Systems
Michael Koban (Morgan State Univ.)
Consequences of Chronic Sleep Deprivation on Metabolism: Altered Uncoupling Protein Expression
Deborah Suchecki (UNIFESP)
Sleep Deprivation & Stress: An Inseparable Pair
Eve Van Cauter (Univ. of Chicago)
Short Sleep, Poor Sleep: Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

NEW TRENDS IN TISSUE ENGINEERING OF THE NERVOUS & CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEMS
Co-sponsored by NAVBO
Chair: Francois Berthod (Laval Univ. School of Medicine) & Nicolas L'Heureux (Cytograft Tissue Engineering)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 214

While tissue engineering approaches have historically focused on the role of synthetic biomaterials, a recent shift toward emphasizing the role of the cellular components has brought on some exiting developments, especially in the fields of neurological and vascular tissue engineering. For the nervous system, innovative strategies have arisen to treat peripheral nerves transections and spinal cord trauma. In addition, the combination of tissue engineering with human adult stem cells differentiated into neural cells could be extremely helpful to develop new models to better understand the causes and the pathological process of several neurodegenerative diseases, and even to design new treatments. Engineering the cardiovascular system remains a challenge, but remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved, leading to the first clinical use of an autologous living small diameter human blood vessel. Moving away from the dogmatic requirements for "off-the-shelf" availability and allowing prolonged in vitro maturation periods have allowed the development of tissues with unprecedented mechanical strength and functionality. This symposium brings together investigators involved in the latest development in tissue engineering and stem/progenitor cell biology. Their research areas span from neurons to smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. This multidisciplinary panel will highlight the promising future of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Nicolas L'Heureux (Cytograft Tissue Engineering)
Sheet-based Tissue Engineering: Autologous Blood Vessels & Beyond
David Vorp (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels
Giorgio Terenghi (Univ. of Manchester)
Tissue Engineering of an Artificial Nerve for Injury Repair
François Berthod (Laval Univ. School of Medicine)
A Tissue-Engineered Model of the Spinal Cord to Study Neurodegenerative Disorders

TESTING DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY PARADIGMS WITH NEW ANATOMICAL MODELS
Sponsored by ASGBI
Chair: Martin Collinson (Univ. of Aberdeen)
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 219

It is tempting to extrapolate studies of development and genetic pathways from a small number of model systems and assume they apply widely across animal taxa. 'Deep homology' is a founding principle of the evo-devo field. Equally, it is well established that anatomical change driven by selection requires modification of developmental pathways over evolutionary time. Examples will be discussed where studies of new or 'wild' model taxa have sometimes confirmed and sometimes challenged what we thought we knew about the morphological developmental biology of animals.

Martin Collinson (Univ. of Aberdeen)
Genetic Pathway Adaptation & Eye Development in the Iberian Mole
James Hanken (Harvard Univ.)
Embryonic Derivation & Segmentation of the Bony Skull are Not Conserved Among Vertebrates: Data from Amphibians
Wim Damen (Institut Für Genetik Der Universität Zu Koln)
Developmental Biology Paradigms: Lessons from Spiders
William Jeffery (Univ. of Maryland)
Generation of Morphological Diversity by Pleiotropy in Blind Cavefish


HYBRID SYMPOSIA

REGULATION OF ANGIOGENESIS BY MACROPHAGES AND CIRCULATING CELLS
Sponsored by NAVBO; co-sponsored by AAA
Chair: Christiana Ruhrberg (Univ. College London)
Saturday, April 18, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 217/218

Macrophages have been implicated in various aspects of pathological angiogenesis. For example, they promote collateral growth after artery occlusion, but they also support unwanted tumor angiogenesis. Recently, macrophages were found to regulate physiological angiogenesis. This symposium will highlight new research into the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie macrophage-mediated angiogenesis and contrast the role of macrophages with those of other types of circulating cells. Invited talks will be supplemented with short talks chosen from submitted abstracts.

Randall Johnson (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Macrophages in Tumor Angiogenesis
Joshua Meisner
CCR2+ and CXRCR1+ Bone-marrow Derived Cells Differentially Regulate Microvascular Remodelling
Donny Putra
Angiogenesis from Endothelial Progenitor Cells is Co-regulated by VEGF and Matrix Stiffness
Christiana Ruhrberg (University College London)
Macrophages Regulate Physiological Angiogenesis
William Raoul (INSERM)
The Role of Microglial Cells in Choroidal Neovascularization

VESICULAR TRANSPORT AND SIGNALING IN THE ENDOTHELIUM
Sponsored by NAVBO; co-sponsored by AAA
Chair: Radu Stan (Dartmouth Medical College)
Saturday, April 18, 2:00 PM-3:45 PM, Room 217/218

The cellular vesicular transport/trafficking controls and modulates the way receptor systems function. In recent years, the vascular endothelium has emerged as a tissue/organ where these processes have achieved a high degree of sophistication. This symposium aims to capture the latest advances in our understanding of the influence of vesicular transport on endothelial functions. Short talks from submitted abstracts will be added to the program.

Michael Simons (Yale Univ.)
VEGF-R2 Trafficking as a Regulator of VEGF Signaling
Radu Stan (Dartmouth Medical College)
Regulation of Vascular Permeability
Jordan Pober (Yale Univ.)
Internalization and Signaling of TNFR in the Endothelium
Amit Choudhury (Univ. of Iowa)
New Connections Linking Sorting & Trafficking of VEGFR2 from Golgi with Angiogenesis

MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION IN DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Chairs: Richard Schneider (Univ. of California San Francisco) & Ralph Marcucio (Univ. of California San Francisco)
Monday, April 20, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 214

Mechanisms that control anatomical pattern are highly conserved among all animals. Yet these same mechanisms also produce the variations observed during normal development that serve as the material basis for evolution. Further, extremes in variation that arise in conjunction with abnormal development account for many malformations and disease processes. Thus, understanding the molecular and cellular origins of morphological variation is essential for answering a variety of basic and clinical questions. For example, what changes are required in genetic signaling networks to alter the morphology of homologous skeletal elements within and between species of fish? Or, to what extent do variations in facial shape that characterize distinct strains of mice result from differential growth of the facial primordia, and at what point do these growth differences predispose some individuals to malformations such as cleft lip and palate? Research in a variety of model and non-model organisms is beginning to address such questions and reveal processes through which natural selection, teratogens, or other factors can generate divergent morphologies.

Charles Kimmel (Univ. of Oregon)
Evolution & Development of Facial Bone Shape
Benedikt Hallgrimsson (Univ. of Calgary)
Developmental Integration, Canalization & Cleft Lip in A/WySn Mice
Paul Trainor (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Phenotypic Variation in the Etiology and Pathogenesis of Congenital Craniofacial Birth Defects Such as Treacher Collins Syndrome
Jane Yu (Univ. of California at San Francisco)
Mesenchymal Regulation of Mineralization and Bone Mineral Density in the Jaw Skeleton
Nathan Young (Univ. of California at San Francisco)
The Relationship between Variable SHH Signaling and the Severity of Structural Defects in the Face and Brain
Johann Eberhart (Univ. of Texas at Austin)
Genetics and Environment Interact Synergistically to Modulate Craniofacial Disease Phenotypes

SYSTEM BIOLOGY APPROACHES FOR INVESTIGATING MICROVASCULAR REMODELING
Co-sponsored by NAVBO
Supported by an educational grant from Tulane University Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Chairs: Walter Murfee (Tulane Univ.) & Shayn Peirce (Univ. of Virginia)
Tuesday, April 21, 10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 214

Microvascular remodeling entails a complex coordination of cellular and molecular dynamics. For example, recent work has emphasized a role for stem cells, the importance of mechanical stresses, and even the relationships between angiogenesis and other processes, such as neurogenesis and inflammation. Translating this knowledge to functional tissue engineering and therapeutic design will undoubtedly require integration across spatial and temporal scales. The objective of this symposium will be to highlight experimental and computational systems biology approaches aimed at integrating multiple cellular and molecular interactions for microvascular assembly. The symposium will offer an opportunity to bring together experimentalists, bioengineers, and computational biologists.

Shayn Peirce (Univ. of Virginia)
Combining Multi-Cell Agent-Based Models with Experiments to Determine Cell Fates in Microvascular Growth
Timothy Secomb (Univ. of Arizona)
Theoretical Simulation of Microvascular Network Growth & Adaptation
Feilim Mac Gabhann (Univ. of Virginia)
Microvascular Response to Ischemia in Mouse Spinotrapezius Muscle: Lessons for Human Vascular Variability

SPECIALIZED FUNCTIONS OF THE VASCULATURE
Sponsored by NAVBO; co-sponsored by AAA
Chair: Deborah Yelon (New York Univ. Medical Center)
Tuesday, April 21, 10:30 AM-12:15 PM, Room 204/205

Although all vessels share some molecular and cellular characteristics, there are many unique features of particular types of vasculature. Much recent attention has focused on the genetic regulation of these specialized traits. Which factors control the particular origins and physiological roles of the lymphatic vessels? How do arteries become distinct from veins? What drives particular cells to create the endocardial lining of the heart? This symposium will feature a variety of perspectives regarding the specification, morphogenesis, and function of specialized vessels.

Deborah Yelon (New York University Medical Center)
Endocardial Specification & Morphogenesis in the Zebrafish Embryo
Anastasiia Aleksandrova (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Time-lapse Imaging Reveals an Extra-cardiac Contribution to the Endocardium and Cardiac Jelly in Avian Embryos
Andre Luiz Pasqua Tavares (Univ. of Arizona)
Temporal and Functional Study of TGFβ Regulated Genes During Chicken AV Canal Formation
Nora Sylvia Sanchez (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Type III Transforming Growth Factor- ß Receptor Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis in Epicardial Cells
Melody Swartz (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
Lymphatic Vasculature

ASYMMETRIES IN DEVELOPMENT
Supported by an educational grant from LSU Health Sciences Center
Chair: Judith Venuti (LSU Health Science Center)
Tuesday, April 21, 2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 219

During development cells receive cues from their environment that provide directional information and they translate this into cellular and tissue asymmetries. We are just beginning to understand how these cues are translated into changes in cell structure and behavior. For example, the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway has been shown to play a major role in the asymmetric distribution of cells and cellular structures during development. PCP genes were originally identified in Drosophila, but recent studies have identified mammalian homologues. This session will discuss similarities and differences between mechanisms of establishing asymmetries in different developmental processes and across species.

Jeffrey Axelrod (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine)
Planar Cell Polarity: From Cells to Tissues to Organisms
Jianbo Wang (Univ. of Alabama)
The Planar Cell Polarity Pathway in Mammalian Embryogenisis
Athula Wikramanayake (Univ. of Miami)
Wnt Signaling and the Evolution of Pattern Formation
Fenglei He (Tulane Univ.)
Wnt5a Regulates Directional Cell Migration and Cell Proliferation via Ror2-mediated Noncanonical Pathway in Mammalian Palatogenesis
Brenda Rongish (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Rotation of Organizer Tissue Contributes to Left-right Asymmetry in Avian Embryos
Oliver Wessely (LSU Health Sciences Center)
The Role of Bicaudal-C in Kidney Development

PLATFORM SESSIONS
AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.

Sunday, April 19

STEM CELLS/REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 219
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
Michael Fritsch (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Henry Young (Mercer Univ. School of Medicine)
Wanakee Carr (Univ. of Iowa)
Kevin Gillinder (Newcastle Univ.)
Mathieu Blais (Universitè Laval)
Marie-Michèle Beaulieu (Universitè Laval)
Sudhanshu Raikwar (Univ. of Iowa)
Richard Vulliet (UC Davis)

Monday April 20

Chair: Carol Nichols (Medical College of Georgia)

Tuesday, April 21

TEACHING INNOVATIONS II
Chair: Jim Brokaw (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)

VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT & REMODELING
8:00 AM-9:00 AM, Room 204/205
NAVBO Mini-symposium
Chair: H. Stuhlmann
Victoria Bautch (Univ. of North Carolina)
Akiko Mammoto (Harvard Medical School)
Paul Rupp (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Anna Durrans (Cornell Univ.)

VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL
9:15 AM-10:15 AM, Room 204/205
NAVBO Mini-symposium
Chairs: H. Singer & B. Isakson
Jenna Passman (Univ. of North Carolina)
Aaron Proweller (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Roman Gregory Ginnan (Albany Medical College)
George Risinger (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Science Center)

ADVANCES IN NEURAL INJURY AND REPAIR
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 217/218
Chair: Keith Fargo (Loyola Univ. Chicago)
Lai Yee Leung (Wayne State Univ.)
Nichole Mesnard (Loyola Univ.)
Taylor Beahrs (Loyola Univ.)
Dale Sengelaub (Indiana Univ.)
Gabrielle Curinga (Univ. of Kentucky)
Joseph Cheatwood (Southern Illinois Univ. School of Medicine)
Changman Zhou (Peking Univ.)

INTEGRATING HISTOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM Chair: Robert Spears (Baylor College of Dentistry)

MECHANO-SENSING/SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION
2:30 PM-4:30 PM, Room 204/205
NAVBO Mini-symposium
Chairs: Brenda Rongish & Elizabeth Jones
Elizabeth Jones (McGill Univ.)
Joanna Rossi (McGill Univ.)
Brian Helmke (Univ. of Virginia)
Hojin Kang (Texas A&M Univ.)

ECM/PROTEASES
3:45 PM-5:00 PM, Room 204/205
NAVBO Mini-symposium
Chairs: K. Bayless & C. Little
Donna Nichol (Weill Medical College, Cornell Univ.)
Hyeongil Kwak (Texas A&M Univ.)
Zhihua Jiang (Univ. of Florida)
Catherine Mao (Univ. of Kentucky)
Elaine Raines (Univ. of Washington)

Wednesday, April 22

DEVELOPMENT & EVOLUTION
8:00 AM-10:00 AM, Room 219
Chair: Stephen Moorman (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Hermann Bragulla (Louisiana State Univ.)
Jennifer Feenstra (Loma Linda Univ.)
Megan Chryst-Ladd (Clemson Univ.)
Mohammad Hajihosseini (Univ. of East Anglia)
Patricia Schneider (Univ. of Iowa)
Christina Freisinger (Univ. of Iowa)
Tamara Franz-Odendaal (Mount Sinai Vincent Univ.)
Jeffrey White (Louisiana State Univ.)

VASCULAR AND CARDIAC AGING
10:30 AM-12:30 PM, Room 217/218
Chairs: Eduard Dedkov (New York College of Osteopathic Medicine) & Douglas Seals (Univ. of Colorado)
Victoria Ballard (GlaxoSmithKline)
Christopher DeSouza (Univ. of Colorado)
Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
Judy Muller-Delp (Univ. of Florida)
Shi Liu (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)


POSTER TOPICS

Sunday, April 19
STEM CELLS
STEM CELLS: POSTNATAL
STEM CELLS: SKELETAL MUSCLE
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
WOUND HEALING
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GENE AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: CELL MIGRATION
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: HEAD AND FACE
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: ANIMAL MODELS
IMAGING: ANATOMY
ANATOMY EDUCATION
ANATOMY EDUCATION: ASSESSMENT, CURRICULUM AND MENTORING
ANATOMY EDUCATION: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
ANATOMY EDUCATION: COMPUTER-ASSISTED LEARNING
ANATOMY EDUCATION: TEACHING METHODS AND INNOVATIONS
ANATOMY EDUCATION: CLINICAL BASED LEARNING

Monday, April 20
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: ANGIOGENESIS AND VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: GENETIC DISORDERS AND ANIMAL MODELS OF VASCULAR DISEASE
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: LYMPHATIC VASCULATURE
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: VASCULAR CELL SIGNALING
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: ECM/PROTEASE/MECHANO-SENSING
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: VASCULAR CELL RECEPTOR/ADHESION MOLECULE TRAFFICKING
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND RESTENOSIS
VASCULAR BIOLOGY: TISSUE-SPECIFIC VASCULATURE
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: DEVELOPMENT
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: LIVE IMAGING
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: CELL BIOLOGY
CARDIOVASCULAR BIOLOGY: ANATOMY AND MORPHOLOGY
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: DEVELOPMENT
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: STEM CELLS AND CELL BIOLOGY
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: EVOLUTION
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: IMAGING AND ANALYSIS
BONES, CARTILAGE AND TEETH: BIOMECHANICS AND DISTRACTION OSTEOGENESIS
TEETH AND ORAL TISSUES
HISTOCHEMISTRY

Tuesday, April 21
ANATOMY: FORM AND VARIATION - HUMAN VASCULAR
ANATOMY: FORM AND VARIATION – MUSCLE
ANATOMY: FORM AND VARIATION – EXTREMITIES
ANATOMY: FORM AND VARIATION - GENERAL HUMAN
ANATOMY: FORENSICS
ANATOMY: FORM AND VARIATION - ANIMAL MODELS
ANATOMY: MATHEMATICAL MODELING
CELL BIOLOGY
CELL BIOLOGY: MEMBRANES AND ORGANELLES
CELL BIOLOGY: SIGNALING
CELL BIOLOGY: ECM CELLS AND EMT
NEUROBIOLOGY: ANATOMY & MORPHOLOGY
NEUROBIOLOGY: CENTRAL, PERIPHERAL & AUTONOMIC SYSTEMS
NEUROBIOLOGY: NEUROIMAGING
NEUROBIOLOGY: NEURONAL AND SPINAL CORD DEGENERATION, REPAIR AND REGENERATION
NEUROBIOLOGY: SENSORY SYSTEMS

 

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