2010 Annual Meeting - Anaheim


April 24-28, 2010 - Anaheim, CA


Keynote - Dr. Leroy Hood
President
Institute for Systems Biology

Systems Approaches to Biology & Disease: Integrating Discovery & Hypothesis-driven Paradigms

The challenge for biology and medicine in the 21st century is the need to deal with its incredible complexity. One powerful way to think of biology is to view it as an informational science requiring systems approaches. This view leads to the conclusion that biological information is captured, mined, integrated by biological networks and finally passed off to molecular machines for execution. Systems approaches are holistic rather than atomistic—and employ both hypothesis-driven as well as discovery-driven approaches. Hence the challenge in understanding biological complexity is that of using systems approaches to deciphering the operation of dynamic biological networks across three time scales of life—development, physiological and disease responses. I will focus on our efforts at a systems approach to disease—looking at prion disease in mice. We have just published a study that has taken more than 5 years—that lays out the principles of a systems approach to disease including dealing with the striking signal to noise problems of high throughput biological measurements and biology itself (e.g. polymorphisms). I will also discuss the emerging technologies (measurement and visualization) that will transform medicine over the next 10 years—including next generation DNA sequencing, microfluidic protein chips and single-cell analyses. It appears that systems medicine, together with pioneering changes such as next-generation DNA sequencing and blood protein measurements (nanotechnology) and as well as the development of powerful new computational and mathematical tools will transform medicine over the next 5-20 years from its currently reactive state to a mode that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory (P4).


PLENARY SPEAKERS


Gary C. Schoenwolf, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor
Univ. of Utah School of Medicine

Formation & Patterning of the Rudiments of the Vertebrate Inner Ear

The inner ear begins its development as a plate of cells (the otic placode) formed from the surface ectoderm of the embryo, which quickly internalizes to form a vesicle called the otocyst. The otocyst in turn forms the developing membranous laby-rinth, which subdivides into dorsal vestibular and ventral auditory components. Two aspects of inner ear development will be discussed: induction of the otic placode; and initial dorsal patterning of the otocyst. Induction of the otic placode involves a cascade of growth factors secreted during gastrulation/early neurulation by all three germ layers: the neuroectoderm (secretes WNT8a and FGF3), the mesoderm (secretes FGF3, 4, and 19), and endoderm (secretes FGF8). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments demonstrate the importance of these factors in establishing a hierarchy of interactions that lead to otic induction. Initial dorsal patterning of the otocyst--manifested by rapid thinning and expansion of the otocyst wall--is con-trolled by BMP signaling that results in a dramatic change in cell shape. Loss of adherens junctions and redistribution of E-Cadherin play important roles in this process. As a result of these changes, dorsoventral regionally specific morphogenesis of the otocyst occurs, leading to structural and functional differences that define the vestibular and auditory components of the developing inner ear.


 

Carmine D. Clemente, Ph.D.
Professor, Director Brain Research
UCLA School of Medicine

Famous & Outstanding Anatomy Professors I Have Known or with Whom I Have Taught

The first two outstanding anatomists I wish to discuss are William Frederic Windle and Horace Winchell Magoun, both students of Stephen Walter Ranson in Chicago. I became acquainted with Bill Windle 60 years ago in 1949 while he was Chairman of Anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania. He interviewed me before my being accepted into graduate school at Penn and his principal question was, "Are you a good student?" I told him that I received A's and B's during my four years at Penn. He re-plied that is not good enough. He required all A's during the first two graduate school years. His next question was, "Do you have a microscope?" My brother had graduated from the Penn Medical School and I said I'm sure I could get his microscope. Then Dr. Windle said, "Come around in September. We will find a place for you." I will talk also about my interaction with Professor Horace Magoun who of-fered me my first job at UCLA. He became my close friend, often advising me through the early years of my academic life. Giving my first paper to the AAA in Detroit, Michigan in 1951 after my second graduate school year, I was nervous and scared. When I started my talk. I noticed that in the audience was the famous Horace Magoun, the discoverer of the Reticular Activating System in the brain stem, responsible for maintaining wakefulness behavior. Later that day I was stunned when he asked me if, when I finished at Penn, I would consider joining him at Los Angeles where UCLA had just opened its medical school.Over the years I also met or taught with such famous professors as John Boilieu Grant, Raymond Jack Last and Oscar Vivian Batson.

 

 AAA STUDENT/POSTDOCTORAL PLATFORM SESSIONS

 Langman Graduate Student Award Presentation
Chair: Lorinda Smith (Univ. of Utah)

Madeleine Chollet (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
Brain morphology of children with cleft lip and/or palate
Katherine McLean (University of Guelph)
A histochemical and immunohistochemical investigation of epimorphic regeneration in the representative lizard, Eublepharis macularius
Leah Olson (University of Iowa)
The potential role for Interferon regulatory factor 6 in keratinocyte adhesion and/or migration
William Pearson (Boston University School of Medicine)
Disambiguating Muscular Forces Effecting Hyoid Movement in Pharyngeal Phase of Deglutition
Alyson Spealman (Weill Cornell Medical College)
C-kit+ cardiac precursor cells exhibit a unique oxidant and antioxidant gene expression profile
Joshua Stefanik (BUMC)
Does quadriceps strength modify the association between patella alta and structural features of osteoarthritis on MRI? The MOST Study

Educational Research Platform Award Presentation
Chair: Lorinda Smith (Univ. of Utah)
Neha Kumar (Mayo Medical School)
Evaluating quality of medical students' dissections in the gross anatomy laboratory
Rebecca Lufler (Boston University School of Medicine)
The Future of Medical Education Research: A Different Way to Analyze Data to Produce More Valid Results/Conclusions

Postdoctoral Platform Award Presentation
Chair: Matt Allen (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine).

Sarah Calve (Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine and Children's Memorial Research Center)
The extracellular matrix plays an active role in muscle regeneration
Grace Lee (Harvard Medical School)
Intravascular flow fields shape intussusceptive pillars in the chick chorioallantoic membrane
Pablo Strobl-Mazzulla (Caltech)
Epigenetic control of neural crest specifier genes by histone demethylases jmjd2A
 

AAA YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARDS SYMPOSIUM

R.R. Bensley Award Lecture in Cell Biology

 


Adrian Salic, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Toward a Chemical Anatomy:New Tools to Image Biological Molecules in Cells and in Tissues

Microscopic imaging has revolutionized our understanding of the structure and function of cells and tissues. At its best, microscopy can detect cellular components with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Additionally, live imaging allows dynamic cellular processes to be studied in a noninvasive manner, with high temporal resolution. In the last decade, a small number of chemical reactions have been developed that occur with high efficiency and specificity under mild conditions in aqueous media. These reactions are bio-orthogonal, involving chemical groups not found in cells and inert toward naturally occurring chemical groups. These reactions are thus ideal for labeling and detecting molecules in vivo. One focus of our lab is to develop chemical technologies for metabolic labeling and direct imaging of biological molecules, based on these bio-orthogonal chemical reactions. My talk will present our recent work on devising novel biosynthetic probes to image nucleic acids and lipids in cells and in tissues.

C.J. Herrick Award Lecture in Neuroanatomy

  


Michael Piper, Ph.D.
NHMRC Research Fellow (Biomedical Career Development Award)
Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland

NFIA controls progenitor cell differentiation through repression of the Notch effector Hes1

Notch signaling plays a central role in regulating the self-renewal of progenitors. The transcription factor Nuclear Factor I A (Nfia) has been implicated downstream of Notch in mid-gestation telencephalic development, regulating the switch towards astrocytic differentiation from radial progenitors. However, a crucial step in this process is the simultaneous repression of Notch signaling which enables subsequent differentiation to occur. How this is regulated is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to regulating astrocyte-specific genes, Nfia represses expression of the Notch effector Hes1. During hippocampal development, we find that Nfia-deficient mice exhibit delays in both neuronal and glial development. Hes1 is significantly up-regulated in Nfia mutant hippocampi, and is a direct transcriptional target of Nfia as shown by bioinformatic approaches, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and in vitro transcriptional assays. Thus, Nfia promotes differentiation of progenitors via complementary mechanisms, through activation of neuronal- and glial-specific genes and via repression of Notch signaling.

H.W. Mossman Award Lecture in Developmental Biology

 


David Bilder, Ph.D.
Univ. of California-Berkeley

Function Follows Form: Linking Epithelial Polarity, Growth control and Morphogenesis in Drosophila

How do cells organize themselves internally in order to take on a specific external form and function? Each of the >200 cell types in the human body has a distinct, sometimes radical, architecture, yet how these properties arise from the relatively isotropic newborn cell remains largely unknown. We are exploring the biology of cell architec-ture in vivo by studying a simple cell type—epithelia—in a highly manipulable model organism—Drosophila. Using unbiased, large-scale forward genetic screens as an entry point, we have identified novel molecular pathways that control cell biological features of epithelial organization, including apicobasal polarity. We have fur-ther investigated how this form ensures the proper functioning of cells during development, by influencing cell adhesion, signaling, and morphogenesis. A particularly dramatic and surprising case is seen in the Drosophila 'neoplastic' tumor suppressor genes, which simultaneously control both cell polarity and cell proliferation; muta-tion of these genes induces uncontrolled growth of disorganized cells that show several striking similarities to malignant human tumors. I will discuss insights that our work has provided into links between epithelial polarity, proliferation control, and organ morphogenesis.

AAA Morphological Sciences Award Lecture

 
Katja Schenke-Layland, Ph.D. - LECTURE CANCELLED
Fraunhofer Institute
Multiphoton Imaging: A Powerful Tool for Tissue-State Diagnosis in Regenerative Medicine

Interactions of cells with the ECM are the basis of many fundamental biological processes, including the forma-tion and organization of tissue structures and the remodeling and turnover of the preexisting tissue matrix due to disease or aging processes. A detailed analysis of the ECM is of great value in gaining structural and diagnostic information, particularly with regard to efforts in the field of regenerative medicine. Multiphoton imaging has be-come a powerful method for the artifact-free evaluation of ECM structures with submicron resolution and without the need for invasive tissue processing. In our studies, we employed this imaging modality to determine the struc-tural features of ECM in native and in vitro-engineered tissues and organs, as well as to monitor ECM formation in stem cell cultures and bio-inspired tissue-equivalents. We were further able to quantify ECM damage and show that it translates into in vivo failure. Although the ability of the minimal-invasive measurement of fluorescence and second harmonic generation intensities based on natural intrinsic fluorophores by optical sectioning has ad-vanced our understanding of ECM structures in their native microenvironment and their role in tissue function and homeostasis, the development of miniaturized multiphoton micro-endoscopes, which can be applied to inter-nal organs, will further help the field of regenerative medicine.


 

 ALL EARS
Chair: Gary Schoenwolf (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)

Congenital hearing loss occurs in up to 1 in 300 newborn infants, emphasizing the importance of eluci-dating mechanisms underlying normal development of the auditory system. Hearing loss in humans re-sults from both genetic and environmental causes, with most hearing loss involving abnormal develop-ment of the inner ear and associated structures. The symposium will include four talks from experts in the field of hearing research, and will utilize multiple animal models to gain a better understanding of how normal development of the auditory system occurs and how it might be perturbed, resulting in hearing loss.

Bruce Riley (Texas A&M Univ.)
Early Patterning in the Zebrafish Inner Ear
Tatjana Piotrowski (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
What Can the Zebrafish Lateral Line Teach Us about Hearing?
Ping Chen (Emory Univ. School of Medicine)
Shaping the Mammalian Inner Ear Sensory Organs by the Vertebrate Planar Cell Polarity Pathway
Neil Segil (House Ear Institute)
Development & Regeneration of the Inner Ear: Coordinating Cell Cycle & Differentiation–Constraining Notch Signaling

REGENERATION OF NERVE FIBERS IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
Chair: Carmine Clemente (UCLA School of Medicine)

 

Interest in the subject of regeneration of nerve cells in the central nervous system (CNS) during the twentieth century was stimulated by Ramon Y Cajal after his two volume book, Degeneration and Regeneration in the Nervous System, was published in 1928. Since that time various reasons have been forwarded for the failure in adult mammals of CNS nerve fibers to regenerate. Even in the most positive research reports, functional regeneration in the higher mammalian spinal cord and brain has been limited, at best. The opportunity that 21st century techniques, especially those related to the development of new CNS neurons from stem cells, might allow better insight and more hopeful results to this enigmatic and important problem.

Oswald Steward (Univ. of California at Irvine)
Regeneration of Spinal Cord Fibers in Genetically Modified Mice
Mark Tuszynski (Univ. of California at San Diego)
Combinatorial Strategies for Promoting Axonal Plasticity After Spinal Cord Injury
Michael Sofroniew (UCLA School of Medicine)
Functional Mechanisms of Reactive Astrocyte Scar Formation
V. Reggie Edgerton (UCLA)
Potential for Regeneration in Recovering Locomotion After Spinal Cord Injury

BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY MINI-MEETING
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record

COMPARATIVE PRIMATE ANATOMY: RECENT MODELS FOR FUNCTIONAL ADAPTATION IN THE POSTCRANIAL SKELETON
Chair: Jason Organ (Saint Louis Univ.)

Modern primates employ a suite of different locomotor modes, enabling efficient navigation through their specific habitats and environments. These locomotor repertoires are the result of evolutionary history, and can be linked to changing habitat structures through time. This session will present new perspectives on comparative primate anatomy of the postcranial skeleton, emphasizing how living primates navigate their environments, and will focus on four of the major joints of the limbs: hips, knees, shoulders, and wrists.

Adam Sylvester (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)
Proximal Tibia Shape & Locomotion
Biren Patel (Stony Brook Univ.)
Integrating Comparative & Experimental Methods to Better Understand the Functional Morphology of Primate Hand Bones
Anne Burrows (Duquesne Univ.)
Shouldering the Burdens of Locomotion & Posture: Glenohumeral Joint Structure in Strepsirrhines
Timothy Ryan (Pennsylvania State Univ.)
Trabecular Bone Structure in the Humeral & Femoral Heads of Anthropoid Primates

 SOMETHING TO CHEW ON: DECIPHERING THE EVOLUTION OF PRIMATE CRANIOFACIAL FORM
Chair: Qian Wang (Mercer Univ. School of Medicine)

Studies on morphology and function have been reshaping our understanding of the diversity of craniofacial forms in primates and early humans. Hypotheses concerning function and evolution of skulls can be developed and tested through various experimental approaches to examine how hard and soft tissues in the head adapt to different patterns of mastication and other activities at both structural and material levels. This symposium highlights the diversity of advanced techniques used to analyze various anatomical components in primate heads by physical anthropologists, and demonstrates how to draw functional and evolutionary conclusions using anatomical principles.

Paul Dechow (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Browridge Morphology & Hominid Evolution: Is There Any Evidence for a Mechanical Influence?
David Strait (Univ. at Albany-SUNY)
Assessing the Structural Performance of the Skull of Australopithecus Africanus During Feeding
Christopher Vinyard (Northeastern Ohio Univ. Colleges of Medicine)
Separate but Equal? Relating Morphological Divergence to Functional Performance in the Evolution of Primate Chewing
David Daegling (Univ. of Florida)
Full Field Strain Analysis of the Colobine Mandibular Symphysis: Evaluation of the Curved Beam Model of Jaw Function

FUNCTIONAL MUSCULOSKELETAL ANATOMY
Chair: Valerie DeLeon (Johns Hopkins Medical School)

Kristen Brown (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Shape differences in the bony pelvis of women with and without pelvic floor disorders
Rebecca Lufler (Boston Univ.)
Forefoot Varus Malalignment: Anatomical Origin and Association with Signs of Patellofemoral Joint Osteoarthritis in Cadavers
Tamojit Ghosh (King Faisal Univ.)
The Genesis of the Popliteal Tendon and the 'Climb' of the Popliteus Muscle
Joshua Stefanik (BUMC)
Does Quadriceps Strength Modify the Association Between Patella Alta and Structural Features of Osteoarthritis on MRI? The MOST Study
Cheryl Hill (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia)
Functional Implications of Temporal Bone Pneumatization in Hominids
Benjamin Laitman (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
The Sleepy Neanderthal Hypothesis: Relationships among Craniofacial Form, Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sleep Deprivation
William Pearson (Boston Univ.)
Disambiguating Muscular Forces Effecting Hyoid Movement in Pharyngeal Phase of Deglutition
Andrea Taylor (Duke Univ.)
The Functional Correlates of Jaw-muscle Fiber Architecture in Primates


 

WHAT'S NEW WITH OLD BONES? THE ANATOMY OF HUMAN EVOLUTION
Chair: Mark Teaford (Johns Hopkins Univ.)

The evolution of humans is documented in anatomic structures preserved in the fossil record. This symposium focuses on paleontological research related to humans and their fossil ancestors. Speakers are well known in the field and bring a tremendous background of fieldwork and research experience, allowing them to present the importance of fossil evidence in a dynamic and compelling context. Talks will range from the origins of our ancestors in early ape-like creatures , to our more well-known fossil relatives, including, the australopithecines, Homo erectus, and the Neanderthals.

Carol Ward (Univ. of Missouri)
How the Family Started: Origins of Hominins
Bill Kimbel (Institute of Human Origins)
Bones of our Earliest Ancestors: Fossil Material of the Australopiths
Fred Grine (SUNY - Stony Brook)
Almost Human: The Fossils of Early Homo
Ian Tattersall (The American Museum of Natural History)
So Close Yet So Far: Who Were the Neanderthals?
Bernard Wood (George Washington University)
Discussant

 

 LIVING PRIMATES & THEIR ANCESTORS IN THE FLESH: COMPARATIVE SOFT TISSUE ANATOMY
Chair: Timothy Smith (Slippery Rock Univ.)

The study of our evolutionary history relies disproportionately on evidence derived from bone. However, soft-tissue anatomy provides unique evidence for the reconstruction of behavior and functional specializations in ancient and extinct primates. This symposium includes recent research on the comparative aspects of soft-tissue anatomy in primates with an emphasis on understanding our evolutionary history and the more recently emerging niche of the genus Homo.

Jason Organ (Saint Louis Univ.)
Tactile Tips, Toes & Tails
Christopher Kirk (Univ. of Texas at Austin)
How Primates Perceive the World: Comparative Anatomy of the Special Sense Organs
Robert Martin (Field Museum of Natural History)
Taking a Close Look at the Little People: What was the Brain of the Flores Hominids Really Like?
Frank Rühli (Univ. of Zurich)
Diagnostic Imaging of Mummified Soft Tissue: Pathologies, Pitfalls & Perspectives
Jeffrey Laitman (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Beyond the Bones: Reconstructing Soft Tissue Anatomy of Our Ancestors


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRACK

THE SPIRIT OF CREATING FUNDABLE PROPOSALS: PREPARING SBIR/STTR, PROGRAM, INSTRUMENT, RESEARCH, INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRAINING GRANTS
Chairs: Lynne Opperman (TAMUSHSC) & Kathy Svoboda (Baylor College of Dentistry)

Many new faculty members and postdoctoral fellows have little idea what kinds of grants are available for individual and institutional advancement. This panel discussion will begin with each participant giv-ing a brief introduction to the different types of grant opportunities, followed by a question and answer session from submitted questions and general questions from the audience. Specific grant types that will be discussed are the clinical and translational science award (CTSA) grants (U54), technology transfer with small business (SBIR/STTR) grants (R41, R42, R43, R44), small and large shared instrument grant (SIG) programs (S10), research education grants (R25), and academic research enhancement award (AREA) grants (R15).

Lynne Opperman (TAMUSHSC)
Translational Research, Technology Transfer and Small Business Grants – Alternate Funding Resources
Kathy Svoboda (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Instrumentation Grant Savvy – What's the Best Fit for Your Institution?
Paul Dechow (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Team Building: Growing Your Research Career through Institutional Awards
Anna Lysakowski (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Research Career Development Awards: Which One is Right for Me?
Panel Discussion

 

  MASTER CLASS: THE PROBLEM WITH PAIN
Chairs: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) & Robert DePhilip (Ohio State Univ. College of Medicine)
Cosponsored with American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics

Pain is a major health problem because of its prevalence and its impact beyond the patient that includes consequences for society and the economy. Yet despite its prevalence and impact, pain is often treated inadequately because the causes can be multiple, the assessment can be difficult, and the treatment has so many options. The goal here is to provide the current thinking on a number of topics that will help provide a better context from which to teach and discuss the topic of pain with students from the various health care professions.

Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine)
Ouch! Neuronal Pathways Responsible for Conduction of Somatosensory & Visceral Pain
Tony Yaksh (Univ. of California, San Diego School of Medicine)
Biology of Transmission in the Pain Pathway
Allan Basbaum (Univ. of California, San Francisco Medical School)
Basic Mechanisms Underlying Pain after Nerve Injury
Quynh Pham (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)
Current Treatment for Chronic Pain

  

REGENERATION OF NERVE FIBERS IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

  

NEUROPHOBIA TO NEUROPHILIA: TEACHING BASIC NEUROSCIENCE AS FOUNDATIONAL TO CLERKSHIPS
Chairs: Jennifer McBride (Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine) & Donald Wong (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Supported by an educational grant from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Medical schools now demand integration of basic and clinical sciences from the start. Neuroscience course directors will share strategies for course integration that meet clerkship expectations. "Neuroanatomy" to "Brain and Behavior" course models in lecture- or problem-based learning environments will be examined. A clerkship director will describe a module within an organ-based curriculum. A basic neuroscientist will focus on assembling basic scientists and clinicians. A clinician will characterize the neuroscience continuum across the curriculum. These diverse perspectives will facilitate restructuring of a complex, if not student-feared discipline into one that stimulates interest with wide clinical application in an integrated curriculum.

Donald Wong (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine)
Integration of Basic & Clinical Neuroscience: Current Models
Joanne Lynn (Ohio State Univ. College of Medicine)
Effective Strategies for Integration of Basic & Clinical Neuroscience: A Clerkship Director Leads the Charge!
Jeanette Norden (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine)
Effective Strategies for Integration of Basic & Clinical Neuroscience: A Basic Scientist Leads the Charge!
Ralph Jozefowicz (Univ. of Rochester)
Continuum of Basic & Clinical Neuroscience Across the Entire Curriculum

  

ANATOMY EDUCATION BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Supported by an educational grant from Touch of Life Technologies

It's common enough for educational innovations to fail the first time they are implemented. So what's a frustrated educator to do? This year's Breakfast Roundtable will focus on the range of assessments that can help guide the evolution of our brilliant ideas into effective action. Larry Rizzolo, Director of Human Anatomy and Bill Rando, Assistant Dean and Director of the McDougal Graduate Teaching Center at Yale University will lead a workshop on the assessments of an innovation, drawing upon our own six-year experience building significant structural and pedagogical innovation in a course in Human Anatomy. We will discuss needs assessments that reveal the range of stakeholders who might support or frustrate your innovation; formative assessments that guide the implementation of your innovation; and summative assessments that convince you and your stakeholders that the innovation is working and deserving of continued support. Bring your own innovation to the Roundtable (planned, current or past) and brainstorm with your colleagues!

 

  TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY I
Chair: Carol Nichols (Medical College of Georgia)

Carlos Suarez-Quian (Georgetown Univ.)
A Guided Electronic Dissector (GED) to Teach Medical Gross Anatomy
David Morton (Univ. of Utah)
Anatomy Table Conference Assessments in Place of Cadaver Practical Exams
Mary Beth Downs (Alabama State Univ.)
The Sensitive Man: An Interactive Computer Program to Teach Cutaneous Nerves, Dermatomes, and Sensory Testing
April Richardson (Univ. of Kentucky)
A Novel Use of Second Life (SL) Technology to Teach the Pterygopalatine Fossa to Medical Students
Darren Hoffmann (Univ. of Iowa Carver College of Medicine)
Medical Students Using Plastinated Prosections as a Sole Learning Tool Perform Equally Well on Identification Exams as Compared to those Performing Dissections over the Same Regions
Kevin Christensen (Mayo Medical School)
Defining the Role of the Student Teaching Assistant in Gross Anatomy
Rebecca Lufler (Boston Univ.)
The Future of Medical Education Research: A Different Way to Analyze Data to Produce More Valid Results/Conclusions

 

 

THE MILLENNIAL STUDENT: WHAT WE SHOULD KNOW
Chair: Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Supported by an educational grant from Elsevier

Multiple aspects of learning behaviors and educational needs relevant to students in the Millennial/ Net Generation will be evaluated in The Millennial Student: What We Should Know. The sessions' first speaker, a member of the Millennial student cohort, will present "best practices and techniques" for learning from the student's perspective. The session will also include, from the faculty perspective, re-designing the learning environment to increase student engagement and exploring Web 2.0 and other content delivery tools to enhance student learning. The session will conclude with a strategy to guide Millennial students toward self-assessment of their learning style and behaviors.

Christopher Ceriale (San Diego State University)
Facilitating Learning: The Millennial Perspective
Robert Kvavik (Univ. of Minnesota)
Redesigning the Learning Environment for the Millenial Student
Patricia McGee (The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio)
Learning, Teaching & Web 2.0: Finding a Comfortable Fit
Camille DiLullo (Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Assessing Millennial Student Behaviors

 TEACHING INNOVATIONS IN ANATOMY II
Chair: Rebecca Fisher (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix)

Thomas Gest (Univ. of Michigan Medical School)
Clinical Cases Based on Body Donors as a Method to Enhance Radiology Education and Clinical Relevance for Gross Anatomy
Alinea Serena Noronha (SUNY Downstate Medical Center)
Stretching the Limits: Dyad Pedagogy and Technology Bolster Anatomy Learning
Carrie Elzie (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham)
Low-tech Anatomy - Bringing Back Games, Music and Art!
Jordan Barker (Univ. of Utah)
A Novel Seven-layered Approach to Teaching Body Wall Anatomy
Mikel Snow (Keck School of Medicine)
Promoting Medical Student Independent Learning using Radiology PowerPoint Self-study Modules in Gross Anatomy
Susan Michelle Lerner (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
Thinking out of the Box: Using the Transplantation Procedure to Teach Renal Anatomy
Reena Karani (Mount Sinai School of Medicine) - CANCELLED
Anatomy of Aging

 

 HYRBID SYMPOSIUM: ANATOMY TEACHING IN AN INTEGRATED CURRICULUM
Supported by an educational grant from The Univ. of Saskatchewan's Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness
Chairs: Baljit Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan) & Geoffrey Guttmann (The Commonwealth Medical College)

There has been a gradual reduction in the times allocated for the anatomy instruction. To offset the reduced teaching time, new and existing medical and veterinary schools are starting to use an integrated approach to the teaching of anatomy. Therefore, it is important to share approaches (didactic, PBL and others) to integrate and the outcomes (learning outcomes) from the integration to develop strategies to enhance anatomy teaching within a fully or partly integrated curriculum. The session will have talks by Dr. Geoff Guttmann from the Commonwealth Medical College and Dr. Linda Mizer from College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University on the integration of anatomy in the medical and veterinary curricula, respectively, in addition to four other presentations.

Linda Mizer (Cornell Univ.)
Anatomy: Assuring a Firm Foundation in a Fluid Veterinary Curriculum
Geoffrey Guttmann (The Commonwealth Medical College)
Designing a First Year Integrated Course to Meet the Mission & Values of a New Medical School
Elizabeth Ann Scoville (Mayo Medical School)
Utilizing peer, near-peer, and inter-professional teaching: A model for integrating embryology into gross anatomy curriculum
Brenda Klement (Morehouse School of Medicine)
Evolution of an Anatomy Based Integrated Curriculum
Robert Klein (Univ. of Kansas, School of Medicine)
Teaching of Anatomy in an Integrated, Electronic Curriculum: Implementation and Evaluation
Baljit Singh (Univ. of Saskatchewan)
Gross anatomy as the foundation of integrated veterinary biomedical curriculum

 

 

 REFRESHER COURSE: SURFACE ANATOMY-THE FOUNDATION OF PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT
Chair: David Bolender (Medical College of Wisconsin) & Robert DePhilip (Ohio State Univ. College of Medicine)

A good history and physical exam is still the most cost effective method for assessing the health condition of a patient. Knowing important anatomical landmarks visible or palpable on the surface of the body is a key in performing an effective physical exam (assessment). It's the primary anatomy they will use every day in their practice. Introductory courses in human anatomy are the perfect place for health science students to begin developing skills of patient assessment that rely on important features of surface anatomy.

Daniel O'Donoghue (Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center)
A Clinician-Anatomist's View of Surface Anatomy
Larry Rizzolo (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
Bringing Anatomy to the Surface: The Integration of Clinical Procedures with Anatomic Dissection
Thierry Bacro (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Inclusion of Surface Anatomy in an Integrated Medical Curriculum: A Hands-on Experience
John Howell (Ohio Univ. College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Haptic Simulation of the Feel of the Body Surface for Training in Palpatory Diagnosis
Panel Discussion
Thierry Bacro (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Hands-on Excercise

 

 SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIA


HYBRID SYMPOSIUM: ENDOTHELIAL TIP CELL GUIDANCE & MECHANISMS
Supported by an educational grant from Aquatic Habitats, Caliper Life Sciences & Union Biometrica - Large Particle Flow Cytometry
Chair: Ramani Ramchandran (Medical College of Wisconsin)

Nerves and vessels are two distinct branching networks in a developing embryo that share molecular mechanisms. Nerves use growth cones at the tip of the growing axon for navigation. Vessels use special-ized tip cells at the end of a growing sprout to direct the sprout. Both growth cones and tip cells utilize guiding mechanism to sense local environment and direct their respective structures. This hybrid sympo-sium will highlight recent discoveries in the field of endothelial tip cell guidance and mechanisms. Talks will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial tip cell sprouting in vitro and in vivo.

Claudio Franco (London Research Institute - Cancer Research UK)
Molecular Control of Sprouting Angiogenesis: Defining Tip/stalk Positions
Robert Fischer (NHLBI)
Actomyosin Contraction & Adhesion Control Angiogenic Sprouting & Guidance
Ganesh Vinayak Samant (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Sox Transcription Factor Mediated Transcriptional Regulation of Robo4 Expression and Function.
Arie Horowitz (Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic)
Vesicle Trafficking of a RhoA Guanine Exchange Factor Regulates VEGF-driven Directional Migration
Andras Czirok (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Endothelial Sprout Formation During Vasculogenesis

BIOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF GLOBAL CHANGE
Chairs: Brian Helmuth (Univ. of South Carolina) & Wenhua Xiong (International Society of Zoological Sciences)

Predicting biological responses to global climate change requires that we understand how large-scale processes such as climate and weather are downscaled to the level of the organism, a process that is significantly affected by the organisms behavior, size, morphology, physiology and genetics. Understanding vulnerability to environmental change further demands a detailed understanding of how organisms respond over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Speakers in this session will describe how an integrative approach, including ecomechanics, physiology, evolution and ecology, can provide a mechanistic framework for predicting the likelihood of future climate change impacts.

Brian Helmuth (Univ. of South Carolina)
A Mechanistic View of Ecology: Why All Global Warming is Local
Lars Tomanek (California Polytechnic State University)
The Costs of Getting Too Hot: Proteins that Take the Heat from Global Warming
Kenneth Leung (The Univ. of Hong Kong)
A Fitness Cost for Thermal Tolerance in the Marine Copepod Tigriopus Japonicus: Implication on Long-term Biological Effects of Global Warming
John Buckeridge (RMIT Univ.)
Climate Change as a Driver for Natural Selection: A Case Study Using Darwin's Barnacles


ALL EARS

ANATOMICAL VARIATION: GENETIC, DEVELOPMENTAL & COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES
Co-sponsored by AAA's Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists
Chair: Benjamin Auerbach (The Univ. of Tennessee)

This symposium focuses on anatomical variation in its broadest sense. Recent studies in genetics, devel-opmental, and comparative anatomy shed new light on how to understand and describe patterns of ana-tomical variation. In this symposium, young anatomists will present their research to explore the nature, causes and implications of biological variation in anatomical structures. The primary goal of the sympo-sium is to highlight the diversity of perspectives on anatomical variation, and to develop a way to com-municate this unique understanding of variation within anatomy research and education.

Kathy Svoboda (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)
Chicken Palates Teach What They Don't Practice: Molecular Signaling in Palate Fusion
Carolyn Rogers (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Facial Muscle Ontogenesis in Human Fetuses With & Without Cleft Lip/palate
Benjamin Auerbach (The Univ. of Tennessee)
Going to Extremities: Is Variation in Human Limb Lengths & Proportions a Paradox?
Rui Diogo (The George Washington Univ.)
Human Muscular Variations: Comparative, Evolutionary & Developmental Perspective

EPICARDIUM TO CORONARY HIERARCHY: MOLECULAR & CELLULAR MECHANISMS
Chair: Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)

Recent studies have advanced our understanding regarding the epicardium's role as a source of progenitor cells for the coronary vasculature. This symposium explores the mechanisms that regulate the fate of progenitor cells in forming the coronary system. The presentations address 1. vasculogenesis and the hemangioblast (Anne Eichmann), 2. transformation of epicardial cells (Ramon Munoz-Chapuli, 3. signals that initiate and regulate the progression of vessel formation (Robert Tomanek), and 4. smooth muscle differentiation and assembly during arteriogenesis (Mark Majesky).

Ramon Munoz-Chapuli (Univ. of Malaga)
Epicardial Cell Transformation
Robert Tomanek (Univ. of Iowa)
Growth Factor Signaling & the Progression of Coronary Vessel Formation
Anne Eichmann (Collège de France)
Vascular Patterning & Guidance
Mark Majesky (Univ. of North Carolina)
Specification & Differentiation of Coronary Smooth Muscle

STEM CELL BASED THERAPY
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)

Not a day goes by without reports of a new study about stem cells. With a new administration in office that reverted the 8-year restriction on the use of stem cells in research, investigation on stem cells and their clinical potential is of prime time. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together investigators involved in the use of stem cells to treat human diseases. We will hear about mesenchymal stem cells to treat mus-culoskeletal disease, hematopoietic stem cells for multiple sclerosis, iPS for human diseases and epi-dermal stem cells for ocular disorders.

Suneet Agarwal (Children's Hospital Boston)
Translational Potential of Patient-specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Johnny Huard (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Regenerative Medicine Based on Muscle Stem Cells: Potential for Tissue Regeneration & Repair
Richard Burt (Northwestern Univ.)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Sclerosis & Type 1 Diabetes
Michele De Luca (Univ. of Modena & Reggio Emilia) - CANCELLED
Use of Stem Cell for Cornea Replacement-Human Studies


REWIRING THE SPINAL CORD: RECOVERY AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY
Chair: M. Douglas Benson (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)

This symposium addresses the obstacles encountered by severed axons as they attempt to regenerate and reconnect to their targets after spinal cord injury. First, we will examine the mechanisms controlling axon outgrowth in the developing spinal cord. Next, we will see how intrinsic potential for axonal growth is tempered in the adult, and consider interventions to promote regeneration in the injured spinal cord. And finally, we will explore the complex spinal cord circuitry that controls locomotion at local levels, and to which regenerating axons must reconnect if they are to restore control of function.

M. Douglas Benson (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)
Ephrin Contribution to Myelin-based Inhibition of Axonal Regeneration
Timothy Gomez (Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School)
Regulation of Spinal Neuron Axon Outgrowth by Calcium Influx through Mechanosensitive TrpC Channels
Zhigang He (Harvard Medical School)
Intrinsic Control of Axon Regeneration
Mary Bunge (The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis/Univ. of Miami)
Combination Strategies to Repair the Injured Spinal Cord
Alain Frigon (Northwestern University)
Re-expression of Locomotion & Reflex Changes after Various Types of Spinal Lesions

DEVELOPMENTAL DYNAMICS SYMPOSIUM: WNT SIGNALING IN DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics
Chair: Richard Dorsky (Univ. of Utah)

Wnt signaling pathways encompass an enormous number of identified components that regulate multiple downstream responses. At their core, however, lie a defined family of secreted ligands that act to regulate gene transcription and cell behavior. Two of the best studied functions of Wnt signaling are the regulation of normal embryonic development and modulation of the disease state. This symposium will explore the recent advances in our understanding of how the Wnt pathway regulates these processes. Presentations will focus on transcriptional and cellular outputs of Wnt signaling in neural, heart, and endoderm development, as well as diseases such as cancer.

Richard Dorsky (Univ. of Utah)
Wnt Target Genes in CNS Development
L. Charles Murtaugh (Univ. of Utah)
Wnt/beta-catenin Signaling in Patterning & Differentiation of the Vertebrate Endoderm
Stefan Hoppler (Univ. of Aberdeen)
Wnt Signalling & GATA Transcription Factors Regulate Heart Muscle Development
Marian Waterman (Univ. of California, Irvine)
LEF/TCFs & Transcription Regulation


FORMATION & REMODELING OF THE COLLATERAL VASCULATURE
Chair: William Chilian (Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine)

This symposium will explore the formation and remodeling of the collateral circulation. Dr. Pries will model how specific metabolic states affects vascular growth. Dr. James Faber will link the phenotype of collateral conductance to specific genes. Dr. Stephen Epstein will present information about mecha-nisms that underlie collateral growth, and how aging impacts these mechanisms. Finally Dr. William Chilian will discuss the impact that mitochondrial function makes on collateral growth in the heart. This session will provide the audience with the latest evidence about critical mechanisms---suggested by models and proven by experiments---that determine formation and remodeling of the collateral circulation.

Axel Pries (Charite Berlin)
Modeling Structural Adaptations of the Vasculature
James Faber (Univ. of North Carolina)
Genetic Regulation of Native Collateral Formation
Stephen Epstein (Washington Hospital Center)
Influence of Aging on Collaterals & on Mechanisms Involved in Collaterogenesis
William Chilian (Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine)
Mitochondrial Basis of Collateral Growth

SWEET CELLS: GLYCANS IN EVOLUTION, DEVELOPMENT & DISEASE
Chair: Kenneth Kramer (NIH)

Glycosylation is among the most common and abundant posttranslational modifications of proteins and lipids. Work from a variety of model systems has recently advanced our understanding that glycans affect most major developmental, biological, and pathological processes, including cell differentiation, signaling, and immune function. Furthermore, alterations in glycan structure are associated with metastasis, tumor progression, and human genetic diseases. This symposium will emphasize the broad application of these advances by highlighting four distinct approaches.

Ajit Varki (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Nothing in the Biology of Glycans Makes Sense, Except in the Light of Evolution
Linda Baum (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA)
Dynamic Changes in Cell Surface Glycosylation Regulate Immune Cell Survival, Differentiation & Function
Lara Mahal (New York Univ.) - CANCELLED
Analyzing the Dynamic Glycome
Kenneth Kramer (NIH)
Complimentary Roles of Proteoglycans in Dorsoventral Development

ENGINEERING PERSPECTIVES ON DEVELOPMENT & DIFFERENTIATION
Chairs: Evan Zamir (Georgia Institute of Technology)

The early mechanical theories of development pursued throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries (Entwiklungsmechanic), were largely abandoned as the genetic era progressed. Over the last decade, however, a renewed interest in understanding the relationship and feedback between genetic and biophysical/mechanical control of cellular and tissue morphogenetic processes has been spurred by technological, computational, and theoretical advances in the field. The goal of this session is to put a spotlight on several investigators whose training in engineering, physics, and math have uniquely enabled them to make fundamental contributions to our understanding of developmental processes and stem cell biology.

Scott Fraser (California Institute of Technology)
Imaging the Dynamics of Embryonic Development
Lance Davidson (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
The Cell- & Tissue-mechanics of Apical Contraction in Epithelia
Adam Engler (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Intrinsic Matrix Properties Regulate Endo- & Mesodermal Specification
Timothy Newman (Arizona State Univ.)
Discreteness, Heterogeneity & Stochasticity: Confronting Realities in Modeling Embryogenesis


HYBRID SYMPOSIUM: DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES IN ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION: REBUILDING THE PAST AND ENGINEERING THE FUTURE
Chairs: Suzanne Verma (Baylor College of Dentistry) & Andrew Christensen (Medical Modeling Inc.)

Advancements in 3D imaging have allowed all manner of digital technology to shine in the areas of ana-tomical reconstruction. Accuracy, timeliness and cost-effectiveness have all improved with the use of reverse engineering, CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping technologies driven by digital anatomical data. The rapid ability to replicate, simulate, design and recreate anatomical structures enable us to not only predict anthropological and medical findings but to visualize solutions by means of digital manipulation and tactile models. This symposium will demonstrate how medical imaging, combined with virtual and physical modeling have helped us better understand the past and put us on course to more properly de-fine and understand the future.

Kenneth Salyer (World Craniofacial Foundation)
Passion & Technology: Separation of Egyptian Conjoined Twins
Douglas Owsley (Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History)
The Scientist's Perspective on Kennewick Man
Suzanne Verma (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)
Advanced digital technology in prosthetic reconstruction
Andrew Christensen (Medical Modeling, Inc.)
Tactile Medical Modeling Using Additive Manufacturing Technologies
Uriel Zapata (Texas A&M Health Science Center, Baylor College of Dentistry)
The digital reconstruction process and the assessment of hard tissue structure and mechanics
Craig Canby (Des Moines Univ.)
Auscultation simulation system captures/replays diagnostic experiences by synchronizing sound, spatial positioning and anatomic visualizations in real-time

ANATOMICAL RECORD SYMPOSIUM: EPIGENETICS - A REGULATORY FORCE
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record
Chair: Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)

The impact of early life events upon adult health is being recognized as an important determinant of adult-onset diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The impact occurs as a con-sequence of interactions between the environment and the genome. A mechanism through which this impact occurs is epigenetics. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur in the absence of altered DNA sequence. It is upon this topic that three speakers will (1) provide a primer on epigenetics by reviewing epigenetic regulation of gene expression (Dr. McKnight), (2) de-scribe fetal origins of lung disease, using PPARg as an epigenetically regulated gene (Dr. Joss-Moore), and (3) discuss the role of nutrition and epigenetics on complex birth defects (Dr. Finnell). A common theme will be to increase understanding of the concept that epigenetics may provide an early life adapta-tion that ensures survival, but at the cost of latter adult health.

Robert McKnight (Univ. of Utah)
Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Regulation
Lisa Joss-Moore (Univ. of Utah)
Fetal Origins of Lung Disease: PPARγ & Epigenetics
Richard Finnell (Texas A&M Univ. System Health Science Center)
Nutrition, Epigenetics & Complex Birth Defects

HYBRID SYMPOSIUM: REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES - BENCH TO BEDSIDE
Chair: Nukhet Aykin-Burns (The Univ. of Iowa)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated as byproducts of intracellular oxidative metabo-lism. Although, at high concentrations they can damage intracellular targets including lipids, proteins, and DNA, at low levels they also have been shown to be key players of important signaling processes that are necessary for sustaining life. Each subcellular compartment is protected by a collection of antioxidant en-zymes and, therefore a balance between ROS and antioxidants is required to maintain normal redox homeo-stasis within mammalian cells. The speakers in this symposium will present basic research studies in the ROS field that relates to human health and disease.

Nukhet Aykin-Burns (The Univ. of Iowa)
The Effect of Age & Oxygen Tension on Keratinocyte Migration
Matthew Zimmerman (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center)
Nanoformulated Superoxide Dismutase 1: Implications for Angiotensin II & Brain-Related Cardiovascular Diseases
Fei Yu (Univ. of Southern California)
Detection of vascular oxidative stress in atherosclerotic lesions by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Philip Wong (Queen's Univ.)
Development of gender-specific cardiac hypertrophy: role of the nitric oxide synthase system
Joshua Little (Saint Louis Univ.)
Temporospatial expression of reactive nitroxidative species in supraspinal regions during the induction and maintenance of central sensitization

INTRA-UTERINE PROGRAMMING & PLACENTATION
Chair: Lopa Leach (Univ. of Nottingham)
Supported by an educational grant from March of Dimes

In recent years, research has emphasized the role of the intra-uterine environment in influencing developmental programming and cardiovascular diseases in later life. In mammals the placenta is a vital organ involved in efficient nutrient supply to the developing fetus. Changes in placental structure, development and functioning at the gene and functional level will influence phenotypic alterations in the fetus. To reflect these current areas of research investigation, the symposium will invite internationally-renowned investigators to provide updates on their recent findings. The symposium will be a timely, prestigious event for the ASGBI and AAA.

Allen Enders (Univ. of California-Davis)
Comparative Placentation: Reasons for Diversity & Phylogenetic Fit
Myriam Hemberger (Univ. of Cambridge)
Epigenetic Lineage Barriers Ensure Normal Trophoblast Differentiation in Early Development
Colin Sibley (Univ. of Manchester) - CANCELLED
Adaptations in Placental Nutrient Supply Capacity to Meet Fetal Demand: Implications for Intrauterine Programming
Lopa Leach (Univ. of Nottingham)
Fetal Vascular Dysfunction in Diabetic Pregnancies: Intimations of Later Disease?

TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCES: THE VIEW FROM THE BENCH & ROLES FOR BASIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENTS
Co-sponsored by the Association of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Neurobiology Chairpersons
Chair: Gwen Childs (Univ. of Arkansas College of Medicine)

This symposium provides three different views of how basic science departments meet the challenges to become more translationally relevant. Dr. Sue Griffin is running a Program project grant that bridges clinical and basic science concepts in neuroimmune functions in Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Edgar Garcia-Rill has developed a Center for Translational Neurosciences, funded by a Center of Biomedical Excellence Grant (COBRE), which has mentored clinician scientists, saving lives and bringing new funding to clinical departments. Dr. Joan Lakoski is involved in mentoring in their CTSA and has run educational programs for CTSA groups nationally. Their formalized mentoring program may be useful to many.

Edgar Garcia-Rill (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)
The Center for Translational Neuroscience: From Bench to Bedside & Back
Joan Lakoski (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Basic Scientists Contribution to CTSAs
W. Sue Griffin (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)
Cytokines in Neurodegenerative Disease Pathogenesis: Translational Potential



 

PLATFORM SESSIONS
AAA Platform Sessions are made up of slide presentations selected from submitted abstracts.
 

 

 

 

DEVELOPMENT & EPIGENETIC INFLUENCES ON DEVELOPMENT
Chair: Judith Venuti (LSU Health Sciences Center)

Drew Noden (Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine)
Embryonic Origins of Avian and Mammalian Laryngeal Musculoskeletal Structures
Rosie Thecia McNeil (Univ. of the Witwatersrand) - CANCELLED
Immunolocalization of VEGF and VEGFR 1 & 2 in Embryonic Lung Tissues
Kenneth Kao (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland)
Regulation of Wnt-mediated Developmental Competency by Pygo-Bcl9 during Body Axis Specification in Xenopus
Grace Lee (Harvard Medical School)
Intravascular Flow Fields Shape Intussusceptive Pillars in the Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane
Emrush Rexhaj (CHUV)
Vascular Dysfunction in Adult Mice Generated by Assisted Reproductive Technologies
Michelle Barton (UT MD Anderson Cancer Center)
Functions and Control of p53 in Embryonic Stem Cells
Jason Tchieu (UCLA)
Role of the Reprogramming Factors in the Induction of Pluripotency
Pablo Hernan Strobl-Mazzulla (Caltech)
Epigenetic Control of Neural Crest Specifier Genes by Histone Demethylases jmjd2A

STEM CELLS
Chair: Martine Dunnwald (Univ. of Iowa)
Maya Sieber-Blum (Newcastle Univ.) - CANCELLED
Human Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cells (hEPI-NCSC)
Jordan Van Orman (Medical College of Wisconsin)
hESC-Derived Definitive Endoderm Induces Cardiomyogenesis in Human Embryonic Stem Cells
Glenn Marsboom (Univ. of Chicago)
The Role of Mitochondrial Activity in the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs)
Alyson Korry Spealman (Weill Cornell Medical College)
C-kit+ Cardiac Precursor Cells Exhibit a Unique Oxidant and Antioxidant Gene Expression Profile
Jeff Leiter (Pan Am Clinic)
Potential for Treatment of Age-related Muscle Atrophy by Exogenous Nitric Oxide and Exercise
Gina Schatteman (The Univ. of Iowa)
Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Stimulate Healing by Modulating Early Inflammatory Processes
Rajasingh Johnson (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)
Reprogramming of Endothelial Progenitor Cells: Unipotency Toward Multipotency

NEW TRENDS IN CARDIAC & VASCULAR BIOLOGY
Chair: Eduard Dedkov (New York College of Osteopathic Medicine/NYIT)
2:30-4:30 p.m., Room 213A

Masahiro Murakami (Yale Univ. School of Medicine)
FGF Regulation of Myocardial Integrity and Angiogenesis
Robert Garriock (Univ. of California San Francisco)
Myocardial BMP Can Promote Orientated Protrusion of the Proepicardium Necessary for Entry of Coronary Vessel Precursors and Epicardial Progenitors to the Heart
Anastasiia Aleksandrova (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center)
Computational Analyses of Endocardial Cell Motion During Cardiovascular Morphogenesis in Transgenic Avian Embryos
Vickas Patel (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Melanocyte-like Cells in the Heart and Pulmonary Veins Contribute to Atrial Arrhythmia Triggers
Jennifer Yang (California Institute of Technology)
Mechanistic Perspective of Early Vertebrate Cardiogenesis
Anita Austin (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Migration and Differentiation of Epicardial Cells Stimulated by TGF-β1, TGF-β2, or BMP-2 do not Require the Type III Transforming Growth Factor ß receptor
Joseph Sanger (SUNY Upstate Medical Univ.)
Distribution and Dynamics of Nonmuscle Myosins IIs in Cardiac and in Skeletal Muscle Cells

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE/WOUND HEALING
Chair: Lynne Opperman (TAMUSHSC)
2:30-4:30 p.m., Room 213B

Leah Olson (Univ. of Iowa)
The Potential Role for Interferon regulatory factor 6 in Keratinocyte Adhesion and/or Migration
Symon San Miguel (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Antioxidants Increased In Vitro Wound Healing of Nicotine-Treated Oral Fibroblasts
Aleah Brubaker (Loyola Univ. Medical Center)
Impact of Aging on Dermal Wound Healing
Mridhula Thangaraj (Louisiana Tech Univ.)
Design of Smart Nanofilms for Regenerative Medicine
Veera Malavia (Baylor College of Dentistry)
Nerve and Vascular Regeneration in Bone Transport Osteogenesis
Sarah Calve (Northwestern Univ.)
The Extracellular Matrix Plays an Active Role in Muscle Regeneration
Katherine McLean (Univ. of Guelph)
A Histochemical and Immunohistochemical Investigation of Epimorphic Regeneration in the Representative Lizard, eublepharis macularius
Matthew Vickaryous (Univ. of Guelph)
The Anatomy and Histology of Wound Healing Following Tail Loss in the Leopard Gecko eublepharis macularius

Tuesday, April 27

NEURAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE & DISEASE
Chair: Keith Fargo (Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital)
2:30-4:30 p.m., Room 213CD

Cara Lynn Wellman (Indiana Univ.)
Sweating the Small Stuff: Stress Effects in Medial Prefrontal Cortex
Ryan Taylor Johnson (Michigan State Univ.)
Astrocytes in the Amygdala
Madeleine Chollet (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Brain Morphology of Children with Cleft Lip and/or Palate
Peter Cserjesi (Tulane Univ.)
Regulation of Sympathetic and Enteric Nervous System Development by Hand2
Kevin Ball (Bloomsburg Univ.)
Morphological Adaptations in the Brain Motive Circuit Induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy)
Melissa Haulcomb (Loyola Univ. Chicago)
Pro-survival and Pro-apoptotic Factors Following Axotomy in a Murine Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Kimberly Anne McDowell (Univ. of Maryland)
The Role of Orexin and Dopamine in Sleep Alterations from the Progressive, Neurotoxin-induced Model of Parkinsonism



POSTER TOPICS

Sunday, April 25
ANATOMY FORM AND VARIATION: NECK, THORAX AND ABDOMEN
ANATOMY FORM AND VARIATION: EXTREMETIES
ANATOMY: MUSCLE, TENDONS AND LIGAMENTS
BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: EPIGENETICS, TERATOGENESIS AND DISEASE
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: GENE AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: HEAD & FACE
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: REPRODUCTION
GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: LIMB DEVELOPMENT & GROWTH
IMAGING: ANATOMY


Monday, April 26
BONES, CARTILAGE & TEETH: TEETH & TOOTH DEVELOPMENT
BONES, CARTILAGE & TEETH: IMAGING AND ANALYSIS
BONES, CARTILAGE & TEETH: CRANIOFACIAL
MUSCLE, BONES, CARTILAGE & TEETH: BIOMECHANICS & EXERCISE
BONES, CARTILAGE & TEETH: CELL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY & DISEASE
NEUROBIOLOGY: NEURAL CELL BIOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT
NEUROBIOLOGY: NEURONAL & SPINAL CORD DEGENERATION, REPAIR & REGENERATION
NEUROBIOLOGY: NEUROPROTECTION & NEUROIMMUNOLOGY
NEUROBIOLOGY: ANATOMY & MORPHOLOGY
NEUROBIOLOGY: BEHAVIOR; NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS; DISEASE; AGING
CARDIOVASCULAR CELL BIOLOGY & DISEASE


Tuesday, April 27
CELL BIOLOGY & CELL SIGNALING
WOUND HEALING, TISSUE REPAIR & REGENERATION
MUSCLE: STEM CELLS & REGENERATION
ANATOMY EDUCATION: COMPUTER-ASSISTED LEARNING
ANATOMY EDUCATION: CLINICAL BASED LEARNING
ANATOMY EDUCATION: TEACHING METHODS & INNOVATIONS
ANATOMY EDUCATION: ASSESSMENT, CURRICULUM & MENTORING
ANATOMY EDUCATION: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH


 

 

WORKSHOP: GETTING PUBLISHED IN THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Chairs: Gary Schoenwolf (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine) & Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record and Developmental Dynamics

In biomedical sciences, publications are the currency used both for advancing science and individual career development. The symposium will focus on strategies to get your paper published in the highest impact journal possible. Three talks will focus on the importance of publication, mechanics of clear and concise writing, what happens from submission to publication, and how to choose a journal to showcase your work. In addition, the audience will participate in a facilitated discussion on publication ethics, based on selected case studies.

Kurt Albertine (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Your Writing Goal Should be to Confuse the Fewest Readers
Gary Schoenwolf (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine)
Choosing Your Journal Wisely
John Carey (American Journal of Medical Genetics)
The Editorial Peer-Review Process
John Fallon (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Publication Ethics

EDUCATION & TEACHING TRACK

 

AAA PLENARY SYMPOSIA

American Association of Anatomists

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