AAA 2013 Scientific Sessions

To see more details on the sessions listed on this page, please click on the plus (+) sign. (click here for a printed version)


Cell Biological Basis of Complex Morphogenesis [Hybrid Symposium]


Chair: Andrew Dudley (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center)

Saturday, April 20, 2013 - 1:30pm - 3:00pm

Topic Category:

Cell Biology

+

Since the publication of On Growth and Form by D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson introduced the idea that complex morphogenetic events could be described by simple cellular changes, biologists have toiled to define the cell behaviors that promote morphogenesis, to determine how key decisions are made on a cellular level, and to elucidate how individual cellular decisions are coordinated on a global scale to generate the vector and scalar properties of specific morphogenetic events. In this session, we will address the mechanisms of tissue and organ morphogenesis through the perspectives of developmental biology, cell biology, evolutionary biology, engineering, and mathematical modeling.

    Andrew Dudley (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center)
    A Novel Mechanism of Chondrocyte Column Formation in Growth Plate Cartilage





Frontiers in Cell Migration: Vessels, Neurogenesis and Cancer


Chair: Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
& Cathy McKinney (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)

Saturday, April 20, 2013 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Topic Category:

Imaging, Neurobiology

+

The frontier of cell migration is defined by our ability to decipher the mechanisms that underlie this basic phenomena.  Yet, collecting the in vivo multiscale data necessary to move from descriptive to mechanistic models of cell migration events has been extremely challenging.  In this session, we will hear how recent advances in intravital imaging now offer exciting visualization and collection of multiscale cell dynamics data in living embryos and adult model systems.  The speakers will present examples from development, neurobiology, and cancer with the goal of engaging discussion of imaging strategies and mechanistic hypotheses of complex cell migration events.
 
     Rakesh Jain (Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital)
     Normalizing Tumor Vasculature and Microenvironment: Insights from In Vivo Microscopy

    Carlos Lois (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School)
    Neuronal Migration in the Adult Vertebrate Brain

    Carol LaBonne (Northwestern Univ.)
    Coordinate Regulation of Core EMT Regulatory Factors is Essential for Migratory and Invasive Behavior

    Paul Kulesa (Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
    Dynamic Formation of the Chick Sympathetic Ganglia

Micro-imaging in Biological Anthropology: Fine Focus on Primate Ontogeny and Evolution


Chair: Tim D. Smith (Slippery Rock Univ.)

Saturday, April 20, 2013 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Topic Category:

Biological Anthropology

+

Biological anthropologists have unprecedented access to anatomical details of our living and extinct primate relatives using micro computed tomography (CT). This symposium offers a tour of virtual dissection and reconstruction of macro- and micro-anatomy using microCT. Topical discussions center on reconstructing cranial morphology of primate ancestors, the internal architecture of the postcranial skeleton in bipeds during development, and the integration of microCT and other methods to produce a dynamic reconstruction of bone growth.

    Alfred L. Rosenberger (City Univ. of New York)
    Uncovering Cranial Anatomy Variation in Fossil Tarsiiform Crania using MicroCT

    Timothy M. Ryan (Penn State Univ.)
    Structural Analyses of the Developing Human Postcranial Skeleton using High-resolution CT

    Tim D. Smith (Slippery Rock Univ.)
    Microanatomical Maps: A CT and Histological Study of Soft Tissue-bone Interfaces in Developing Primates

Evolution of Host-pathogen Interactions: Understanding How Microbial Pathogens Hijack Host Cells


Chair: Julian Guttman (Simon Fraser Univ.)

Sunday, April 21, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Cell Biology

+

Pathogens have devised a variety of elaborate strategies to control host cells for their benefit and through studying microbial-host cell interactions a number of seminal findings have emerged.  These include the discovery and function of the Arp2/3 complex, understanding how microbes control endocytic processes and determining how signalling events are usurped during disease progression. In this symposium we will hear from three of the world’s leading bacterial and viral infection researchers as they present their discoveries that continue to shape our cell biological and microbiological landscapes.

    John A.T. Young (The Salk Institute for Biological Studies)
    Systems Biology Analysis of HIV-host Interactions

    Matthew Welch (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
    Mobilization of the Actin Cytoskeleton by Microbial Pathogens

    Pascale Cossart (Institut Pasteur)
    Host Pathogen Interactions: New Lessons from Listeria Monocytogenes

The Use of Pluripotent Stem Cells in Disease Modeling


Chair: Lezanne Ooi (Univ. of Wollongong)

Sunday, April 21, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Cell Biology
 
Co-sponsored by AAA’s Advisory Committee for Young Anatomists

+

The differentiation of stem cells into disease-relevant cell types is particularly useful in the study of diseases affecting tissues that are difficult to obtain via biopsy. This session will focus on the use of stem cells to model such diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. It will include an analysis of the benefits and potential drawbacks of the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, generated from the somatic cells of patients, in modelling the disease environment and the possibilities for the future.
 

    Rudolf Jaenisch (Whitehead Institute/MIT)
    Stem Cells, Pluripotency and Nuclear Reprogramming

    Paulina Ordonez (Univ. of California, San Diego)
    Disruption and Therapeutic Rescue of a Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Model of Niemann Pick Type C1

    Lezanne Ooi (Univ. of Wollongong)
    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Tools for Disease Modelling and Drug Discovery in Alzheimer’s Disease

Development and Reprogramming of Vascular Smooth Muscle


Chair: Charles Little (Kansas Univ. Medical Center)

Monday, April 22, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Cardiovascular, Developmental Biology

+

How versatile is the vascular smooth muscle cell? What is its kinship to related cells such as “fibroblasts”? And how, if at all, can we identify the characteristics of a “true” vascular smooth muscle cell?  Or is the term — vascular smooth muscle — simply our meager attempt to put this fascinating cell in a convenient box? The story of vascular smooth muscle cells and their many incarnations begins early in development and continues well into adulthood. The Symposium speakers bring unique perspectives to address how VSM cells and their progenitors decide what is required of them in response to different biological and physiological environments.

    Hervé Kempf (CNRS-Univ. Henri Poincaré Nancy I)
    Reprogramming of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells into Calcifying Cells: What Can We Learn from the Embryo?

    Robert Mecham (Washington Univ., St. Louis)
    Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Aortic Cell Differentiation

    Mark Majesky (Univ. of Washington)
    Development and Diversity of Vascular Smooth Muscle Progenitors

Comparative Perspectives on the Human Face: Biomedical Implications of Evolutionary Anatomical Research


Chair: Anne Burrows (Duquesne Univ.)

Monday, April 22, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Neurobiology, Evolution
 
Co-sponsored by The Anatomical Record

+

The human face stands out among those of all other primates as being distinctive in its high degree of mobility and importance in social interactions, paralleling the exceptional nature of human social groups among primates and the development of the human “mind”. Our understanding of the morphological and developmental aspects of the human face has rapidly developed, especially in the arena of biomedical applications. However, the salient, unique features of the human face cannot be understood outside of a comparative framework. Speakers in this session will focus on recent comparative advances in the genetic, anatomical, physiological, and neurobiological aspects of the human face as they relate to the evolution of humans and a spectrum of biomedical applications.  Specific topics will include human face transplants, autism, and trisomies.

    Janine Ziermann (Howard Univ.)
    Comparative Anatomy of Mammalian and Primate Facial Muscles and Evolutionary Genetics of Atavistic Muscles in Humans with Trisomy

    Seth Dobson (Dartmouth College)
    Neuroanatomical Causes and Social Consequences of Variation in Facial Motor Control: What Comparative Primatology Can Teach Us about Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Anne Burrows (Duquesne Univ.)
    How Good are Mice and Monkeys as Models for Human Face Transplants? Comparative Physiological Perspectives on Myosin Fiber Types

Developmental Backgrounds Underlying the Morphological Evolution of Vertebrates


Chair: Shigeru Kuratani (Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN)

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Developmental Biology, Evolution
 
Co-sponsored by Developmental Dynamics

+

Based on the recent studies of non-model vertebrate groups, this session will discuss the origin and developmental components for the vertebrate body plan, and embryological and developmental changes and factors that resulted in novel craniofacial patterns in evolution. James Hanken talks about the evolutionary and developmental roles of neural crest cells in the evolution of the vertebrate skull, and Shigeru Kuratani deals with the embryonic anatomy of the hagfish craniofacial region to characterize the morphology of cyclostomes, to understand the origin gnathostome cranial region.

    James Hanken (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard Univ.)
    Embryonic Origin of the Skull: Has the Pattern of Neural Crest Derivation Changed during Vertebrate Evolution?

    Shigeru Kuratani (Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN)
    What We Can Learn from Hagfish Embryology


Imaging Live Tissues


Chair: Michiko Watanabe (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine)

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Imaging

+

How do you probe the delicate and sensitive embryo hearts or brain tissues while they are alive?  The investigators speaking at this symposium have found clever ways.  They have created or adapted technology to extract information that has been until recently impossible to access without destruction or perturbation of what they are studying.   Speakers will describe how they overcame the challenges of investigating a tiny beating embryonic heart and the dynamic neural tissue and vasculature of the nervous system.

    Michael Jenkins (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
    Visualizing and Perturbing the Embryonic Cardiovascular System with Light

    Elizabeth Hillman (Columbia Univ.)
    In-vivo Dynamic and Hyperspectral Microscopy

    Anna Devor (Univ. of California, San Diego)
    Signaling Mechanisms of Neurovascular Communication in the Cerebral Cortex

Neurobiology of Aging [Hybrid Symposium]


Chair: Michael Kawaja (Queen's Univ.)

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm

Topic Category:

Neurobiology
 
Sponsored by the Canadian Association for Anatomy, Neurobiology & Cell Biology

+

The Alzheimer Society of Canada has recently announced that nearly three quarters of a million Canadians (i.e., 2% of the national population) are living with cognitive impairment, including dementias and Alzheimer’s disease.  Of equal concern is the prediction that this number will double by 2031.  Research focused on the neurobiology of aging is advancing our understanding of the cellular events that proceed and predispose the mammalian brain to degenerative events that contribute to the onset and maintenance of cognitive impairments.  Our Hybrid Symposium will highlight Canadian research aimed at resolving critical neurodegenerative events associated with normal and pathological aging in laboratory mammals and humans alike.
AAA will be accepting abstracts for an oral presentation in this hybrid symposium.  Abstracts will be selected by January 2013.

    Margaret Fahnestock (McMaster Univ.)
    Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Circuit Degeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease





Neurovascular Development


Chair: Joseph McCarty (MD Anderson Cancer Center)

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm

Topic Category:

Neurobiology

+

The mammalian central nervous system contains billions of neurons and glia that are interlaced with an elaborate network of blood vessels. Cues within the neural microenvironment regulate blood vessel development and physiology as well as formation of the blood-brain barrier. In turn, vascular-derived factors control neural cell growth, differentiation and migration. In this session we will focus on signaling mechanisms that couple neural cells to vascular endothelial cells and pericytes. In particular, wewill detail roles for soluble growth factors, transmembrane adhesion receptors, and extracellular matrix proteins in mediating neurovascular development and disease.

    Joseph McCarty (MD Anderson Cancer Center)
    Cell Adhesion and Signaling Pathways in Neurovascular Development

    Richard Daneman (Univ. of California, San Francisco)
    Roles for Pericytes at the Neurovascular Unit

    Angeliki Louvi (Yale School of Medicine)
    CNS Vascular Malformations and the Neurovascular Unit

Novel 3D Imaging with Micro Computed Tomography


Chair: Rick Sumner (Rush Univ. Medical Center)

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm

Topic Category:

Imaging

+

Microcomputed x-ray tomography offers nondestructive 3D imaging of ex vivo specimens at very high resolution (submicron in some newer laboratory scanners) and high resolution scanning in vivo (~20 micrometers).  The technique is best developed for bone and other tissues which strongly attenuate x-rays.  The use of contrast agents is now making this technique useful for soft tissues.  In vivo imaging presents additional challenges.  The speakers will share their expertise in imaging of cartilage and the gut in addition to bone and will provide insight into optimizing in vivo imaging.  These methods of performing 3-D imaging, data processing and analysis should be applicable to a variety of tissues of interest to anatomists.

    Elise Morgan (Boston Univ.)
    Cartilage Imaging and Other Novel Assessments of Bone Repair

    Mary Barbe (Temple Univ.)
    Nondestructive microCT Imaging of Soft Tissues Using Phosphotungstic Acid-hematoxylin, Intravascular Contrast Agent, and Perfluorochemical

    Harrie Weinans (Erasmus Univ.)
    In Vivo Imaging

Expanding Translational Research and Impacting Patient Care Through the Use of Cadaveric Material


Chair: H. Wayne Lambert (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine)

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 8:00am - 9:30am

Topic Category:

Translational Research

+

The goal of translational research is to adapt biomedical research discoveries to impact surgical outcomes and patient care or going “from the bench to the bedside”.  This symposium will highlight how anatomists can engage clinicians to create collaborations, which can lead to impactful translational research and even reverse translational research.  It will discuss past and current research projects where anatomists, through their own expertise and the use of cadaveric material, were able to “get a piece of the clinical research pie”, which led to additional scholarship projects, funding, and, most importantly, a significant impact on surgical outcomes and patient care.

    H. Wayne Lambert (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine)
    Using Cadaveric Material to Impact Translational Research: From Anatomy Lab to the Operating Room

    Jonathan Wisco (Brigham Young Univ.)
    "Getting a Piece of the Clinical Research Pie" - Why Translational Research Should Matter to You

    R. Shane Tubbs (Children's Hospital, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham)
    Reverse Translational Research with a Neuroanatomic Focus: From the Bedside to the Bench

The Skinny on Fat: Adipose Tissue and Stem Cells


Chair: Julie Fradette (Université Laval/ LOEX)

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 8:00am - 9:30am

Topic Category:

Regeneration/Tissue Engineering

+

The importance of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) and of adipose tissue itself has been proven in a variety of experimental biology systems. Adipose tissue is now recognized as an major endocrine tissue/organ in addition to being a great source of stem cells. First, the impact of adipose tissue from various fat depots on metabolic responses at the tissue level will be presented by André Tchernof, PhD. Then, tissue engineering applications and cellular therapies making promising use of ASCs will be discussed by Julie Fradette, PhD. Finally, translational medicine applications of ASCs and fat grafting in a clinical setting will be presented by Adam Katz, MD.

    Andre Tchernof (Université Laval)
    Region-specific Alterations in Adipose Tissue Function: Cardiometabolic Risk Goes Belly-up

    Julie Fradette (Centre LOEX de l’Universite Laval)
    Spotlight on Adipose Tissue as a Remarkable Stem Cell Source for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications

    Adam Katz (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine)v
    Putting Fat to Work: Therapeutic Possibilities for Adipose Tissue and Cells

Responses to Novel Environmental Stimuli: Induction and Epigenetic Inheritance [Hybrid Symposium]


Chair: Yoav Soen (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 8:00am - 9:30am

Topic Category:

Developmental Biology

+

Organisms have evolved a wide repertoire of efficient responses to frequently occurring environmental stimuli (e.g. recurrent changes in temperature, food supply, etc’). However, in some cases, organisms may encounter rare or severe forms of stress for which they may not have an efficient solution already in place. How developing organisms respond and cope with such scenarios is poorly understood and the potential epigenetic implications to subsequent generations of offspring are underexplored. The aim of this session is to present experimental models, discuss epigenetic mechanisms of responses to rare and severe stress, and evaluate potential implications to the offspring.
 
AAA will be accepting abstracts for an oral presentation in this hybrid symposium.  Abstracts will be selected by January 2013.

    Yoav Soen (Weizmann Institute of Science)
    Coping with Unexpected Environments – Implications for Epigenesis





Autophagy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardioprotection


Chair: Roberta Gottlieb (San Diego State Univ.)

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Topic Category:

Cardiovascular

+

This session will examine the impact of overnutrition on autophagy and mitochondrial quality control, with special attention to the heart.  Dr. Shirihai will discuss mitochondrial shape changes and autophagy, and will present data on the effects of specific nutrients on mitochondrial quality control.  The molecular basis of mitochondrial quality control will be reviewed.  Dr. Mentzer will present data from translational models of metabolic syndrome (Zucker obese rats and Yucatan miniswine fed a high fat, high fructose diet), and early clinical data from heart surgery patients.  Dr. Gottlieb will present data on the role of mitophagy in cardioprotection, and the basis for cardioprotection by statins.

    Orian Shirihai (Boston Univ. School of Medicine)
    Mitochondrial Fusion, Fission, and Autophagy: Impact of Diet on Mitochondrial Quality Control

    Robert Mentzer (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine)
    Autophagy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Heart Surgery

    Roberta Gottlieb (San Diego State Univ.)
    Mitophagy and Cardioprotection

Brain Interfaces and Their Therapeutic Applications


Chair: Jonathan Wolpaw (Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health)

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Topic Category:

Neurobiology

+

This symposium addresses the burgeoning new field of non-invasive and invasive brain interface research and development. It provides a succinct review of its present state and future prospects in three major areas: (1) brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that measure brain activity and convert it into artificial outputs that replace, restore, enhance, supplement, or improve natural CNS output, and thus can help people with severe disabilities; (2) brain stimulation methods that use electrical or magnetic stimuli delivered non-invasively or invasively to modify brain function; and (3) spinal reflex conditioning protocols that can improve motor function after spinal cord injuries and in other disorders. The scientific and clinical significance of advances in each area will be highlighted.

    Jonathan Wolpaw (Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health)
    Brain-computer Interfaces for Replacing, Restoring, or Improving CNS Function

    Alvaro Pascual-Leone (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Univ.)
    Electrical and Magnetic Stimulation to Improve Brain Function

    Aiko Thompson (Helen Hayes Hospital, Columbia Univ.)
    Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Improve Function Recovery after CNS Damage
American Association of Anatomists

9650 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20814-3998
Tel: 301-634-7910 | Fax: 301-634-7965

 

Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.           
home ~ contact us